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Neva
The Neva (Russian: Нева́, IPA: [nʲɪˈva]) is a river in northwestern Russia
Russia
flowing from Lake Ladoga
Lake Ladoga
through the western part of Leningrad Oblast
Leningrad Oblast
(historical region of Ingria) to the Neva Bay
Neva Bay
of the Gulf of Finland. Despite its modest length of 74 kilometres (46 mi), it is the fourth largest river in Europe
Europe
in terms of average discharge (after the Volga, the Danube
Danube
and the Rhine).[1] The Neva is the only river flowing from Lake Ladoga. It flows through the city of Saint Petersburg, three smaller towns of Shlisselburg, Kirovsk and Otradnoye, and dozens of settlements. The river is navigable throughout and is part of the Volga–Baltic Waterway
Volga–Baltic Waterway
and White Sea – Baltic Canal
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Peter The Great Bridge
A bridge is a structure built to span physical obstacles without closing the way underneath such as a body of water, valley, or road, for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle. There are many different designs that each serve a particular purpose and apply to different situations
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Rapid
Rapids
Rapids
are sections of a river where the river bed has a relatively steep slope. Its intensity ranges from a scale of 1-8, with 1 being the most navigable and 8 being the least gradient, causing an increase in water velocity and turbulence. Rapids
Rapids
are hydrological features between a run (a smoothly flowing part of a stream) and a cascade. Rapids
Rapids
are characterised by the river becoming shallower with some rocks exposed above the flow surface. As flowing water splashes over and around the rocks, air bubbles become mixed in with it and portions of the surface acquire a white colour, forming what is called "whitewater". Rapids
Rapids
occur where the bed material is highly resistant to the erosive power of the stream in comparison with the bed downstream of the rapids
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Danube
The Danube
Danube
or Donau (/ˈdænjuːb/ DAN-yoob, known by various names in other languages) is Europe's second longest river, after the Volga. It is located in Central and Eastern Europe. The Danube
Danube
was once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire, and today flows through 10 countries, more than any other river in the world. Originating in Germany, the Danube
Danube
flows southeast for 2,860 km (1,780 mi), passing through or touching the border of Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova
Moldova
and Ukraine
Ukraine
before emptying into the Black Sea. Its drainage basin extends into nine more countries
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Rhine
The Rhine
Rhine
(Latin: Rhenus, Romansh: Rein, German: Rhein, French: le Rhin,[1] Dutch: Rijn) is a European river that begins in the Swiss canton of Graubünden
Graubünden
in the southeastern Swiss Alps, forms part of the Swiss-Liechtenstein, Swiss-Austrian, Swiss-German and then the Franco-German border, then flows through the German Rhineland
Rhineland
and the Netherlands
Netherlands
and eventually empties into the North Sea. The largest city on the Rhine
Rhine
is Cologne, Germany, with a population of more than 1,050,000 people
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Finnish Language
Finnish ( suomi (help·info), or suomen kieli [ˈsuomen ˈkieli]) is a Finnic language
Finnic language
spoken by the majority of the population in Finland
Finland
and by ethnic Finns
Finns
outside Finland. It is one of the two official languages of Finland
Finland
and an official minority language in Sweden. In Sweden, both standard Finnish and Meänkieli, a Finnish dialect, are spoken. The Kven language, a dialect of Finnish, is spoken in Northern Norway
Norway
by a minority group of Finnish descent. Finnish is a member of the Finnic language
Finnic language
family and is typologically between fusional and agglutinative languages
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Swedish Language
Swedish ( svenska (help·info) [²svɛnːska]) is a North Germanic language spoken natively by 9.6 million people, predominantly in Sweden
Sweden
(as the sole official language), and in parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with Finnish. It is largely mutually intelligible with Norwegian and to some extent with Danish, although the degree of mutual intelligibility is largely dependent on the dialect and accent of the speaker. Both Norwegian and Danish are generally easier to read than to listen to because of difference in accent and tone when speaking. Swedish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
living in Scandinavia during the Viking Era
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River Delta
A river delta is a landform that forms from deposition of sediment carried by a river as the flow leaves its mouth and enters slower-moving or stagnant water.[1][2] This occurs where a river enters an ocean, sea, estuary, lake, reservoir, or (more rarely) another river that cannot transport away the supplied sediment. The size and shape of a delta is controlled by the balance between watershed processes that supply sediment and receiving basin processes that redistribute, sequester, and export that sediment.[3][4] The size, geometry, and location of the receiving basin also plays an important role in delta evolution. River deltas are important in human civilization, as they are major agricultural production centers and population centers
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Paleozoic
The Paleozoic
Paleozoic
(or Palaeozoic) Era ( /ˌpeɪliəˈzoʊɪk, ˌpæ-/;[1][2] from the Greek palaios (παλαιός), "old" and zoe (ζωή), "life", meaning "ancient life"[3]) is the earliest of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
Eon. It is the longest of the Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
eras, lasting from 541 to 251.902 million years ago, and is subdivided into six geologic periods (from oldest to youngest): the Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Carboniferous, and Permian. The Paleozoic
Paleozoic
comes after the Neoproterozoic Era of the Proterozoic
Proterozoic
Eon and is followed by the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era. The Paleozoic
Paleozoic
was a time of dramatic geological, climatic, and evolutionary change
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Littorina Sea
Littorina Sea
Littorina Sea
(also Litorina Sea) is a geological brackish-water stage of the Baltic Sea, which existed around 7500–4000 BP and followed the Mastogloia Sea, transitional stage of the Ancylus Lake. The Littorina Sea
Littorina Sea
is named after common periwinkle (Littorina littorea), then a prevailing mollusc in the Baltic waters, which indicates salinity of the sea. The Littorina Sea
Littorina Sea
was a period of transgression and maximum salinity during the warmer Atlantic period
Atlantic period
of European climatology. At the optimum, approximately 4500 BP, the sea contained twice the volume of water and covered 26.5% more surface area than it does today
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Smolny Institute
The Smolny Institute
Smolny Institute
(Russian: Смольный институт, Smol'niy institut) is a Palladian edifice in St Petersburg
St Petersburg
that has played a major part in the history of Russia.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The building was commissioned from Giacomo Quarenghi
Giacomo Quarenghi
by the Society for Education of Noble Maidens and constructed in 1806–08 to house the Smolny Institute
Smolny Institute
for Noble Maidens, established at the urging of Ivan Betskoy
Ivan Betskoy
and in accordance with a decree of Catherine II (the Great) in 1764, borrowing its name from the nearby Smolny Convent
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Discharge (hydrology)
In hydrology, discharge is the volumetric flow rate of water that is transported through a given cross-sectional area.[1] It includes any suspended solids (e.g. sediment), dissolved chemicals (e.g. CaCO3(aq)), or biologic material (e.g. diatoms) in addition to the water itself. Synonyms vary by discipline. For example, a fluvial hydrologist studying natural river systems may define discharge as streamflow, whereas an engineer operating a reservoir system might define discharge as outflow, which is contrasted with inflow.Contents1 Theory and calculation 2 Catchment discharge 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTheory and calculation[edit] GH Dury and MJ Bradshaw are two hydrologists who devised the models showing the relationship between discharge and other variables in a river
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Moraine
A moraine is any glacially formed accumulation of unconsolidated glacial debris (regolith and rock) that occurs in both currently and formerly glaciated regions on Earth (i.e. a past glacial maximum), through geomorphological processes. Moraines are formed from debris previously carried along by a glacier and normally consist of somewhat rounded particles ranging in size from large boulders to minute glacial flour. Lateral moraines are formed at the side of the ice flow and terminal moraines at the foot, marking the maximum advance of the glacier
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Liteyny Bridge
A bridge is a structure built to span physical obstacles without closing the way underneath such as a body of water, valley, or road, for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle. There are many different designs that each serve a particular purpose and apply to different situations
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Cubic Mile
A cubic mile (abbreviation: cu mi or mi3[1]) is an imperial and US customary (non-SI non-metric) unit of volume, used in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom
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Calcium Bicarbonate
Calcium
Calcium
bicarbonate, also called calcium hydrogen carbonate, has a chemical formula Ca(HCO3)2. The term does not refer to a known solid compound; it exists only in aqueous solution containing the calcium (Ca2+), bicarbonate (HCO3−), and carbonate (CO32−) ions, together with dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2). The relative concentrations of these carbon-containing species depend on the pH; bicarbonate predominates within the range 6.36-10.25 in fresh water. All waters in contact with the atmosphere absorb carbon dioxide, and as these waters come into contact with rocks and sediments they acquire metal ions, most commonly calcium and magnesium, so most natural waters that come from streams, lakes, and especially wells, can be regarded as dilute solutions of these bicarbonates
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