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Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
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Gumelniţa–Karanovo Culture
Culture
Culture
(/ˈkʌltʃər/) is the social behavior and norms found in human societies. Culture
Culture
is considered a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. Some aspects of human behavior, social practices such as culture, expressive forms such as art, music, dance, ritual, religion, and technologies such as tool usage, cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies
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Arzachena Culture
The Arzachena
Arzachena
culture was a late Neolithic
Neolithic
pre-Nuragic culture occupying the northeastern part of Sardinia
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Ozieri Culture
The Ozieri
Ozieri
culture (or San Michele culture) was a prehistoric pre-Nuragic culture that occupied Sardinia
Sardinia
from c
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Khirokitia
Khirokitia (sometimes spelled Choirokoitia; Greek: Χοιροκοιτία [çiɾociˈti.a], Turkish: Hirokitya) is an archaeological site on the island of Cyprus dating from the Neolithic age. It has been listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1998. The site is known as one of the most important and best preserved prehistoric sites of the eastern Mediterranean. Much of its importance lies in the evidence of an organised functional society in the form of a collective settlement, with surrounding fortifications for communal protection
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Megalithic Temples Of Malta
The Megalithic Temples of Malta
Malta
(Maltese: It-Tempji Megalitiċi ta' Malta) are several prehistoric temples, some of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites,[1] built during three distinct time periods approximately between 3600 BC and 700 BC on the island country of Malta.[2] They have been claimed as the oldest free-standing structures on Earth,[3] although the largely buried Göbekli Tepe complex in southern Turkey is far older.[4][5] Archaeologists believe that these megalithic complexes are the result of local innovations in a process of cultural evolution.[6][7] This led to the building of several temples of the Ġgantija
Ġgantija
phase (3600–3000 BC), culminating in the large Tarxien
Tarxien
temple complex, which remained in use until 2500 BC
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Qaraoun Culture
The Qaraoun
Qaraoun
culture is a culture of the Lebanese Stone Age
Stone Age
around Qaraoun
Qaraoun
in the Beqaa Valley.[1] The Gigantolithic
Gigantolithic
or Heavy Neolithic flint tool industry of this culture was recognized as a particular Neolithic
Neolithic
variant of the Lebanese highlands by Henri Fleisch, who collected over one hundred flint tools within two hours on 2 September 1954 from the site. Fleisch discussed the discoveries with Alfred Rust and Dorothy Garrod, who confirmed the culture to have Neolithic elements. Garrod said that the Qaraoun
Qaraoun
culture "in the absence of all stratigraphical evidence may be regarded as mesolithic or proto-neolithic".[2] References[edit]^ Lorraine Copeland; P. Wescombe (1965). Inventory of Stone-Age sites in Lebanon, p. 43. Imprimerie Catholique
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Yarmukian Culture
The Yarmukian culture
Yarmukian culture
was a Neolithic
Neolithic
culture of the ancient Levant. It was the first culture in prehistoric Israel
Israel
and one of the oldest in the Levant
Levant
to make use of pottery. The Yarmukian derives its name from the Yarmouk River
Yarmouk River
which flows near its type site at Sha'ar HaGolan, a kibbutz at the foot of the Golan Heights.Yarmukian pottery vessel, Sha'ar HaGolanContents1 Sha'ar HaGolan1.1 Pottery 1.2 Art2 Related sites 3 Bibliography 4 Gallery 5 ReferencesSha'ar HaGolan[edit] The first Yarmukian settlement was unearthed at Megiddo during the 1930s, but was not identified as a distinct Neolithic
Neolithic
culture at the time
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Butmir Culture
Butmir
Butmir
Culture was major late Stone Age culture which existed in Butmir, near Sarajevo, in vicinity of Ilidža
Ilidža
in Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina, dating from the Neolithic
Neolithic
period. It is characterized by its unique pottery, and is one of the best researched European cultures from 5100–4500 BC.[1][2] It was part of the larger Danube civilization.Contents1 History 2 Settlements 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Butmir
Butmir
culture and their geographical environment.The Butmir
Butmir
culture was discovered in 1893, when Austro-Hungarian authorities began construction on the agricultural college of the University of Sarajevo. Various traces of human settlement were found dating to the Neolithic
Neolithic
period
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Cishan Culture
Coordinates: 36°42′N 114°12′E / 36.7°N 114.2°E / 36.7; 114.2 The Cishan culture
Cishan culture
(6500–5000 BC) was a Neolithic
Neolithic
culture in northern China, on the eastern foothills of the Taihang Mountains.[1] The Cishan culture
Cishan culture
was based on the farming of broomcorn millet, the cultivation of which on one site has been dated back 10,000 years.[2] The people at Cishan also began to cultivate foxtail millet around 8700 years ago.[3] However, these early dates have been questioned by some archaeologists due to sampling issues and lack of systematic surveying.[4] There is also evidence that the Cishan people cultivated barley and, late in their history, a japonica variety of rice. Common artifacts from the Cishan culture
Cishan culture
include stone grinders, stone sickles and tripod pottery
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Pengtoushan Culture
The Pengtoushan culture, dating 7500–6100 BC,[1] was a Neolithic culture centered primarily around the central Yangtze River region in northwestern Hunan, China. It was roughly contemporaneous with its northern neighbor, the Peiligang culture. The two primary examples of Pengtoushan culture are the type site at Pengtoushan and the later site at Bashidang. The type site at Pengtoushan was discovered in Li County, Hunan
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Peiligang Culture
The Peiligang
Peiligang
culture is the name given by archaeologists to a group of Neolithic
Neolithic
communities in the Yi-Luo river basin in Henan
Henan
Province, China. The culture existed from 7000 to 5000 BC. Over 100 sites have been identified with the Peiligang
Peiligang
culture, nearly all of them in a fairly compact area of about 100 square kilometers in the area just south of the river and along its banks
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Jarmo
Jarmo
Jarmo
(Qal'at Jarmo) is a prehistoric archeological site located in Iraq
Iraq
on the foothills of the Zagros Mountains. It lies at an altitude of 800 m above sea-level in a belt of oak and pistachio woodlands. Excavations revealed that Jarmo
Jarmo
was an agricultural community dating back to 7090 BC
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Usatovo Culture
The Coţofeni culture (Serbian: Kocofeni) (also called the Usatovo culture) was an Early Bronze Age archaeological culture that existed between 3500 and 2500 BC. in the mid-Danube area of south-eastern Central Europe. The first report of a Coţofeni find was made by Fr. Schuster[1] in 1865 from the Râpa Roşie site in Sebeş (present-day Alba County, Romania). Since then this culture has been studied by a number of people to varying degrees. Some of the more prominent contributors to the study of this culture include C. Gooss, K. Benkő, B. Orbán, G. Téglas, K. Herepey, S
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Coțofeni Culture
The Coţofeni culture (Serbian: Kocofeni) (also called the Usatovo culture) was an Early Bronze Age
Bronze Age
archaeological culture that existed between 3500 and 2500 BC. in the mid- Danube
Danube
area of south-eastern Central Europe. The first report of a Coţofeni find was made by Fr. Schuster[1] in 1865 from the Râpa Roşie site in Sebeş
Sebeş
(present-day Alba County, Romania). Since then this culture has been studied by a number of people to varying degrees. Some of the more prominent contributors to the study of this culture include C. Gooss, K. Benkő, B. Orbán, G. Téglas, K. Herepey, S
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Cernavodă Culture
The Cernavodă
Cernavodă
culture, ca. 4000—3200 BC, was a late Copper Age archaeological culture. It was along the lower Eastern Bug River and Danube
Danube
and along the coast of the Black Sea
Black Sea
and somewhat inland, generally in present-day Romania
Romania
and Bulgaria. It is named after the Romanian town of Cernavodă. It is a successor to and occupies much the same area as the earlier neolithic Karanovo culture, for which a destruction horizon seems to be evident. It is part of the "Balkan-Danubian complex" that stretches up the entire length of the river and into northern Germany via the Elbe
Elbe
and the Baden culture; its northeastern portion is thought to be ancestral to the Usatovo culture. It is characterized by defensive hilltop settlements
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