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Neochoerus
Neochoerus aesopi † Neochoerus occidentalis † Neochoerus cordobai † Neochoerus pinckneyi † Neochoerus sirasakae † Neochoerus sulcidens † Neochoerus tarijensis Neochoerus ("new hog") is an extinct genus of rodent closely related to the living capybara. Fossil remains of Neochoerus have been found through North America (México and United States) and South America in Boyacá, Colombia.[1] References[edit]^ Soatá in the Paleobiology databaseFurther reading[edit]Paleobiology Database query for NeochoerusTaxon identifiersWd: Q753267 EoL: 4468642 Fossilworks: 42131 GBIF: 4829587This article about a prehistoric rodent is a stub
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Pleistocene
For the Holocene, dates are relative to the year 2000 (e.g. Greenlandian began 11,700 years before 2000). For the begin of the Northgrippian a date of 8,236 years before 2000 has been set.[2] The Meghalayan has been set to begin 4,250 years before 2000, apparently from a calibrated radio-carbon date of 4,200 years BP i.e. before 1950.[3][clarification needed] 'Chibanian' and 'Tarantian' are informal, unofficial names proposed to replace the also informal, unofficial 'Middle Pleistocene' and 'Upper Pleistocene' subseries/subepochs respectively. In Europe and North America, the Holocene
Holocene
is subdivided into Preboreal, Boreal, Atlantic, Subboreal, and Subatlantic
Subatlantic
stages of the Blytt–Sernander time scale
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Fossilworks
Fossilworks
Fossilworks
is a portal which provides query, download, and analysis tools to facilitate access to the Paleobiology Database, a large relational database assembled by hundreds of paleontologists from around the world.History[edit] Fossilworks
Fossilworks
was created in 2013 by John Alroy and is housed at Macquarie University. It includes many analysis and data visualization tools formerly included in the Paleobiology Database.[1]References[edit]^ "Frequently asked questions". Fossilworks
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Encyclopedia Of Life
Early research and development:1965 (1965): NPL network planning starts 1966 (1966): Merit Network
Merit Network
founded 1966 (1966): ARPANET
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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Colombia
Coordinates: 4°N 72°W / 4°N 72°W / 4; -72 Republic
Republic
of Colombia República de Colombia  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Libertad y Orden" (Spanish) "Freedom and Order"Anthem: ¡Oh, Gloria Inmarcesible!  (Spanish) O unfading glory!Location of  Colombia  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Bogotá 4°35′N 74°4′W / 4.583°N 74.067°W / 4.583; -74.067Official languages SpanishaRecognized regional languages 68 ethnic languages and dialects
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Boyacá Department
Boyacá (Spanish pronunciation: [boʝaˈka]) is one of the thirty-two departments of Colombia, and the remnant of Boyacá State, one of the original nine states of the "United States of Colombia". Boyacá is centrally located within Colombia, almost entirely within the mountains of the Eastern Cordillera to the border with Venezuela, although the western end of the department extends to the Magdalena River at the town of Puerto Boyacá. Boyacá borders to the north with the Department of Santander, to the northeast with the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela
Venezuela
and Norte de Santander, to the east with the departments of Arauca and Casanare
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Taxonomy (biology)
In biology, taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus, and species
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Species
In biology, a species (/ˈspiːʃiːz/ // (listen)) is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank of an organism, as well as a unit of biodiversity. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which any two individuals of the appropriate sexes or mating types can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. Other ways of defining species include their karyotype, DNA
DNA
sequence, morphology, behaviour or ecological niche. In addition, paleontologists use the concept of the chronospecies since fossil reproduction cannot be examined. While these definitions may seem adequate, when looked at more closely they represent problematic species concepts. For example, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, and in a ring species
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Prehistory
Human prehistory is the period between the use of the first stone tools c. 3.3 million years ago and the invention of writing systems. The earliest writing systems appeared c. 5,300 years ago, but writing was not used in some human cultures until the 19th century or even later. The end of prehistory therefore came at very different dates in different places, and the term is less often used in discussing societies where prehistory ended relatively recently. Sumer
Sumer
in Mesopotamia, the Indus valley civilisation
Indus valley civilisation
and ancient Egypt were the first civilisations to develop their own scripts, and to keep historical records; this took place already during the early Bronze Age. Neighbouring civilizations were the first to follow. Most other civilizations reached the end of prehistory during the Iron
Iron
Age
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William Perry Hay
William Perry Hay (born in Eureka, Illinois
Eureka, Illinois
on December 8, 1871; died in 1947) was an American zoologist known for work on crayfish and reptiles. He was the son of Oliver Perry Hay.[1][2] The standard author abbreviation Hay is used to indicate this individual as the author when citing a zoological name.[3] References[edit]^ William Perry Hay papers ^ Science obituary ^ "The Code Online". International Council of Zoological Nomenclature. Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 170933310 LCCN: no2011075490 Botanist: Hay SNAC: w6mg8dbqThis article about an American zoologist is a stub
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Caviidae
 Caviinae  Dolichotinae  HydrochoerinaeThe cavy family (Caviidae) is a family of rodents native to South America, including the domestic guinea pig, wild cavies, and the capybara, among other animals. They are found across the continent, in open areas from moist savanna to thorn forests or scrub desert. This rodent family has fewer members than most other rodent families, with 18 species in six genera. Characteristics[edit] Guinea pig
Guinea pig
and capybara skullWith the exception of the maras, which have a more rabbit-like appearance, caviids have short, heavy bodies and large heads. Most have no visible tails. They range in size from the smaller cavies at 22 cm in body length, and 300 grams in weight, up to the capybara, the largest of all rodents at 106 to 134 cm in length, and body weights of 35 to 66 kilograms
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Rodent
Anomaluromorpha Castorimorpha Hystricomorpha
Hystricomorpha
(incl. Caviomorpha) Myomorpha SciuromorphaCombined range of all rodent species (not including introduced populations)Rodents (from Latin
Latin
rodere, "to gnaw") are mammals of the order Rodentia, which are characterized by a single pair of continuously growing incisors in each of the upper and lower jaws. About 40% of all mammal species are rodents; they are found in vast numbers on all continents except Antarctica
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Mammal
Mammals
Mammals
(from Latin mamma "breast") are vertebrate animals constituting the class Mammalia (/məˈmeɪliə/), and characterized by the presence of mammary glands which in females produce milk for feeding (nursing) their young, a neocortex (a region of the brain), fur or hair, and three middle ear bones. These characteristics distinguish them from reptiles and birds, from which they diverged in the late Triassic, 201–227 million years ago. There are around 5,450 species of mammals. The largest orders are the rodents, bats and Soricomorpha
Soricomorpha
(shrews and others). The next three are the Primates (humans, apes, monkeys, and others), the Cetartiodactyla
Cetartiodactyla
(whales and even-toed ungulates), and the Carnivora
Carnivora
(cats, dogs, seals, and others). In cladistics, which reflect evolution, mammals are classified as endothermic amniotes
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Chordate
And see textA chordate (/kɔːrdeɪt/) is an animal constituting the phylum Chordata. During some period of their life cycle, chordates possess a notochord, a dorsal nerve cord, pharyngeal slits, an endostyle, and a post-anal tail: these five anatomical features define this phylum. Chordates are also bilaterally symmetric; and have a coelom, metameric segmentation, and a circulatory system. The Chordata
Chordata
and Ambulacraria
Ambulacraria
together form the superphylum Deuterostomia. Chordates are divided into three subphyla: Vertebrata (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals); Tunicata
Tunicata
(salps and sea squirts); and Cephalochordata
Cephalochordata
(which includes lancelets). There are also extinct taxa such as the Vetulicolia
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