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Neman River
The Neman, Nemunas, Nyoman, Niemen or Memel,[1] a major Eastern European river, rises in Belarus
Belarus
and flows through Lithuania
Lithuania
before draining into the Curonian Lagoon, and then into the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
at Klaipėda. It begins at the confluence of two smaller tributaries (map coordinates 53.348194,27.108377), about 15 kilometers (9 mi) southwest of the town of Uzda
Uzda
in central Belarus, and about 55 km (34 mi) southwest of Minsk. In its lower reaches it forms the border between Lithuania
Lithuania
and Russia's Kaliningrad Oblast. It also, very briefly, forms part of the Belarus– Lithuania
Lithuania
border
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Weimar Republic
The Weimar
Weimar
Republic (German: Weimarer Republik [ˈvaɪmaʁɐ ʁepuˈbliːk] ( listen)) is an unofficial, historical designation for the German state during the years 1919 to 1933. The name derives from the city of Weimar, where its constitutional assembly first took place. The official name of the state remained Deutsches Reich, unchanged since 1871. In English, the country was usually known simply as Germany. A national assembly was convened in Weimar, where a new constitution for the Deutsches Reich
Deutsches Reich
was written and adopted on 11 August 1919. In its fourteen years, the Weimar
Weimar
Republic faced numerous problems, including hyperinflation, political extremism (with paramilitaries – both left- and right-wing) as well as contentious relationships with the victors of the First World War
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Rivulet
A stream is a body of water[1] with surface water flowing within the bed and banks of a channel. The stream encompasses surface and groundwater fluxes that respond to geological, geomorphological, hydrological and biotic controls[2]. Depending on its location or certain characteristics, a stream may be referred to by a variety of local or regional names. Streams are important as conduits in the water cycle, instruments in groundwater recharge, and corridors for fish and wildlife migration. The biological habitat in the immediate vicinity of a stream is called a riparian zone. Given the status of the ongoing Holocene extinction, streams play an important corridor role in connecting fragmented habitats and thus in conserving biodiversity
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Neman (other)
The Neman is a European river that rises in Belarus and flows through Lithuania. Neman may also refer to:Neman culture FC Neman Grodno, a soccer club in Belarus FC Neman Mosty, a soccer club in Belarus HK Neman Grodno, an ice hockey club in Belarus Neman Stadium, a stadium in Belarus Neman R-10, a Soviet aircraft of the 1930s Neman (bus), bus manufacturer in BelarusPlaces[edit]Neman, Russia, a town in Kaliningrad Oblast, RussiaSee also[edit]Nieman (other) Nemansky (other) Nema (other)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Neman. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Masty, Belarus
Masty (Belarusian: Масты; Lithuanian: Mastai) or Mosty (Russian: Мосты́; Polish: Mosty) is a city in Grodno Region, Belarus, the administrative center of Masty District.v t eSubdivisions of Grodno Region, BelarusDistricts (raiony)Ashmyany Astravyets Byerastavitsa Dzyatlava Grodno Iwye Karelichy Lida Masty Navahrudak Shchuchyn Slonim Smarhon Svislach Vawkavysk Voranava ZelvaDistrict centresGrodno Astravyets Ashmyany Dzyatlava Iwye Karelichy Lida Masty Navahrudak Slonim Smarhon’ Shchuchyn Svislach Vawkavysk Vyalikaya Byerastavitsa Voranava ZelvaCitiesGrodno Astravyets Ashmyany Dzyatlava Iwye Karelichy Lida Masty Navahrudak Skidzyel’ Slonim Smarhon’ Shchuchyn Svislach Vawkavysk Vyalikaya ByerastavitsaThis Belarus location article is a stub
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Kaliningrad Oblast
Kaliningrad
Kaliningrad
Oblast (Russian: Калинингра́дская о́бласть, Kaliningradskaya oblast) is a federal subject of the Russian Federation
Russian Federation
that is located on the coast of the Baltic Sea. As an oblast, its constitutional status is equal to each of the other 84 federal subjects. Its administrative center is the city of Kaliningrad, formerly known as Königsberg. It is the only Baltic port in the Russian Federation
Russian Federation
that remains ice-free in winter. According to the 2010 census, it had a population of 941,873.[10] The oblast is an exclave, bordered by Poland
Poland
to the south and Lithuania
Lithuania
to the east and north, so visa-free travel to the main part of Russia
Russia
is possible only by sea or air. The territory was formerly part of East Prussia
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Last Glacial Period
The last glacial period occurred from the end of the Eemian interglacial to the end of the Younger Dryas, encompassing the period c. 110,000 – c. 11,700 years ago. This most recent glacial period is part of a larger pattern of glacial and interglacial periods known as the Quaternary glaciation
Quaternary glaciation
extending from c. 2,588,000 years ago to present.[1] During this last glacial period there were alternating episodes of glacier advance and retreat. Within the last glacial period the Last Glacial Maximum was approximately 22,000 years ago. While the general pattern of global cooling and glacier advance was similar, local differences in the development of glacier advance and retreat make it difficult to compare the details from continent to continent (see picture of ice core data below for differences). Approximately 13,000 years ago, the Late Glacial Maximum
Late Glacial Maximum
began
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Tributary
A tributary[1] or affluent[2] is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem (or parent) river or a lake.[3] A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean.[4] Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean. A confluence, where two or more bodies of water meet together, usually refers to the joining of tributaries. The opposite to a tributary is a distributary, a river or stream that branches off from and flows away from the main stream.[5] Distributaries are most often found in river deltas.Contents1 Terminology 2 Ordering and enumeration 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerminology[edit]Looking downstream, the Shenandoah River
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Tributaries
A tributary[1] or affluent[2] is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem (or parent) river or a lake.[3] A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean.[4] Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean. A confluence, where two or more bodies of water meet together, usually refers to the joining of tributaries. The opposite to a tributary is a distributary, a river or stream that branches off from and flows away from the main stream.[5] Distributaries are most often found in river deltas.Contents1 Terminology 2 Ordering and enumeration 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerminology[edit]Looking downstream, the Shenandoah River
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Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
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Quaternary
Quaternary
Quaternary
( /kwəˈtɜːrnəri/) is the current and most recent of the three periods of the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era in the geologic time scale of the
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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State Of The Teutonic Order
The State of the Teutonic Order
Teutonic Order
(German: Staat des Deutschen Ordens; Latin: Civitas Ordinis Theutonici), also called Deutschordensstaat (pronounced [ˈdɔʏtʃ ɔɐdənsˌʃtaːt]) or Ordensstaat[2] (pronounced [ˈɔɐdənsˌʃtaːt]) in German, was a crusader state formed by the Teutonic Knights
Teutonic Knights
or Teutonic Order
Teutonic Order
during the 13th century Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
along the Baltic Sea. The state was based in Prussia
Prussia
after the Order's conquest of the Pagan Old Prussians
Old Prussians
which began in 1230. It expanded to include at various times Courland, Gotland, Livonia, Neumark, Pomerelia
Pomerelia
and Samogitia. Its territory was in the modern countries of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Russia
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Tsar
Tsar
Tsar
(/zɑːr/ or /tsɑːr/) (Old Church Slavonic: ц︢рь [usually written thus with a title] or цар, цaрь), also spelled csar, or czar, is a title used to designate East and South Slavic monarchs or supreme rulers of Eastern Europe. As a system of government in the Tsardom of Russia
Tsardom of Russia
and the Russian Empire, it is known as Tsarist autocracy, or Tsarism
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Alexander I Of Russia
Alexander I (Russian: Александр Павлович, Aleksandr Pavlovich; 23 December [O.S. 12 December] 1777 – 1 December [O.S. 19 November] 1825[a][1]) reigned as Emperor of Russia from 23 March 1801 to 1 December 1825. He was the son of Paul I and Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg. Alexander was the first Russian King of partitioned Poland, reigning from 1815 to 1825, as well as the first Russian Grand Duke
Grand Duke
of Finland. He was sometimes called Alexander.[2] He was born in Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
to Grand Duke
Grand Duke
Paul Petrovich, later Emperor
Emperor
Paul I, and succeeded to the throne after his father was murdered. He ruled Russia during the chaotic period of the Napoleonic Wars. As prince and emperor, Alexander often used liberal rhetoric, but continued Russia's absolutist policies in practice
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War And Peace
War and Peace
War and Peace
(pre-reform Russian: Война́ и миръ; post-reform Russian: Война́ и мир, translit. Voyná i mir [vɐjˈna i ˈmʲir]) is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy. It is regarded as a central work of world literature and one of Tolstoy's finest literary achievements.[1][2][3] The novel chronicles the history of the French invasion of Russia
French invasion of Russia
and the impact of the Napoleonic era
Napoleonic era
on Tsarist
Tsarist
society through the stories of five Russian aristocratic families. Portions of an earlier version, titled The Year 1805,[4] were serialized in The Russian Messenger from 1865 to 1867. The novel was first published in its entirety in 1869.[5] Tolstoy said War and Peace
War and Peace
is "not a novel, even less is it a poem, and still less a historical chronicle"
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