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Nelson A. Miles
Nelson Appleton Miles (August 8, 1839 – May 15, 1925) was an American military general who served in the American Civil War, the American Indian Wars, and the Spanish–American War. From 1895 to 1903, he served as the last Commanding General of the United States Army before the office was abolished.Contents1 Early life 2 Civil War 3 Indian Wars 4 Spanish–American War
Spanish–American War
and later life 5 Military awards5.1 Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
citation6 Memberships 7 Legacy 8 Dates of rank 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksEarly life[edit] Miles was born in Westminster, Massachusetts, on his family's farm
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Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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John Sherman (politician)
John Sherman
John Sherman
(May 10, 1823 – October 22, 1900) was a politician from the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio
during the American Civil War
American Civil War
and into the late nineteenth century. A member of the Republican Party, he served in both houses of the U.S. Congress. He also served as Secretary of the Treasury and Secretary of State. Sherman sought the Republican presidential nomination three times, coming closest in 1888, but was never chosen by the party. His brothers included General William Tecumseh Sherman; Charles Taylor Sherman, a federal judge in Ohio; and Hoyt Sherman, an Iowa banker. Born in Lancaster, Ohio, Sherman later moved to Mansfield, where he began a law career before entering politics. Initially a Whig, Sherman was among those anti-slavery activists who formed what became the Republican Party. He served three terms in the House of Representatives
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Kiowa
Kiowa
Kiowa
(/ˈkaɪəwə, -wɑː, -weɪ/[2][3]) people are a Native American tribe and an indigenous people of the Great Plains
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Battle Of The Wilderness
Inconclusive (Union offensive continued)[2]Belligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leadersUlysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. LeeUnits involvedArmy of the Potomac[3] IX Corps[4]Army of Northern VirginiaStrength124,232 ("present for duty")[5][6] 60–65,000[6]Casualties and losses17,666 (2,246 killed,  12,037 wounded,  3,383 captured/missing)[7][8] 11,033 (1,477 killed,   7,866 wounded,  1,690 captured/missing)[8]v t eOverland CampaignWilderness Spotsylvania Court House Yellow Tavern Meadow Bridge North Anna Wilson's Wharf Haw's Shop Totopotomoy Creek Old Church Cold Harbor Trevilian Station Saint Mary's ChurchThe Battle of the Wilderness, fought May 5–7, 1864, was the first battle of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's 1864 Virginia
Virginia
Overland Campaign against Gen. Robert E. Lee
Robert E

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Battle Of Spotsylvania Court House
Inconclusive (Union offensive continues) [1]Belligerents United States
United States
(Union) CSA (Confederacy)Commanders and leadersUlysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. LeeUnits involvedArmy of the Potomac[2] IX Corps[3] (Army of the Ohio)Army of Northern VirginiaStrength100–110,000[4] 50–63,000[4]Casualties and losses18,399 (2,725 killed,  13,416 wounded,  2,258 captured/missing)[5][6] 12,687 (1,515 killed,  5,414 wounded,  5,758 captured/missing)[6]v t eOverland CampaignWilderness Spotsylvania Court House Yellow Tavern Meadow Bridge North Anna Wilson's Wharf Haw's Shop Totopotomoy Creek Old Church Cold Harbor Trevilian Station Saint Mary's ChurchThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, sometimes more simply referred to as the Battle of Spotsylvania (or the 19th-century spelling Spottsylvania), was the second major battle in Lt. Gen
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Major General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and United States Air Force, major general is a two-star general-officer rank, with the pay grade of O-8. Major general ranks above brigadier general and below lieutenant general.[1][Note 1] A major general typically commands division-sized units of 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Major general is equivalent to the two-star rank of rear admiral in the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
and is the highest permanent rank during peacetime in the uniformed services. Higher ranks are technically temporary ranks linked to specific positions, although virtually all officers who have been promoted to those ranks are approved to retire at their highest earned rank.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Promotion, appointment, and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History4.1 U.S. Army 4.2 Confederate States Army 4.3 U.S. Marine Corps 4.4 U.S
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Regular Army (United States)
The Regular Army of the United States succeeded the Continental Army as the country's permanent, professional land-based military force.[1] Even in modern times the professional core of the United States Army continues to be called the Regular Army. From the time of the American Revolution until after the Spanish–American War, state militias and volunteer regiments organized by the states (but thereafter controlled by federal authorities and federal generals in time of war) supported the smaller Regular Army of the United States. These volunteer regiments came to be called United States Volunteers (USV) in contrast to the Regular United States Army
United States Army
(USA)
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Brigadier General (United States)
In the United States Armed Forces, brigadier general (BG, BGen, or Brig Gen) is a one-star general officer with the pay grade of O-7 in the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force. Brigadier general ranks above a colonel and below major general. The rank of brigadier general is equivalent to the rank of rear admiral (lower half) in the other uniformed services (the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, as both Armed Forces and Uniformed Services; and the Public Health Service and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, as Uniformed Services). The NATO
NATO
equivalent is OF-6.Contents1 History 2 Statutory limits 3 Promotion, appointment and tour length 4 Retirement 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The rank of brigadier general has existed in the U.S. military since the inception of the Continental Army
Continental Army
in June 1775
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Brevet (military)
In many of the world's military establishments, a brevet (/brəˈvɛt/ ( listen) or /ˈbrɛvɪt/ ( listen))[1] was a warrant giving a commissioned officer a higher rank title as a reward for gallantry or meritorious conduct but without conferring the authority, precedence, or pay of real rank.[2] An officer so promoted was referred to as being brevetted (for example, "he was brevetted major general"). The promotion would be noted in the officer's title (for example, "Bvt. Maj. Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain" or "Bvt. Col
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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Battle Of Chancellorsville
Chancellorsville Campaign:133,868 ("present for duty equipped"):[7][8]Chancellorsville: c. 106,000 ( Army of the Potomac
Army of the Potomac
minus VI Corps-2nd Div./II Corps);[7]2nd Fredericksburg/Salem Church: c
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Comanche
The Comanche
Comanche
/kəˈmæntʃiː/ (Comanche: Nʉmʉnʉʉ) are a Native American nation from the Great Plains
Great Plains
whose historic territory, known as Comancheria, consisted of present-day eastern New Mexico, southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas, western Oklahoma, and most of northwest Texas
Texas
and northern Chihuahua. The Comanche people
Comanche people
are federally recognized as the Comanche
Comanche
Nation, headquartered in Lawton, Oklahoma.[1] After European contact, the Comanches were hunter-gatherers with a horse culture. As many as 45,000 Comanches may have been alive in the late 18th century.[2] They were the dominant tribe on the Southern Plains and often took captives from weaker tribes during warfare, selling them as slaves to the Spanish and later Mexican settlers
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Battle Of Antietam
The Battle of Antietam
Battle of Antietam
/ænˈtiːtəm/, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the Southern United States, was fought on September 17, 1862, between Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia
Virginia
and Union General George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac, near Sharpsburg, Maryland
Sharpsburg, Maryland
and Antietam Creek
Antietam Creek
as part of the Maryland
Maryland
Campaign. It was the first field army–level engagement in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War
American Civil War
to take place on Union soil and at present remains the bloodiest day in American history, with a combined tally of 22,717 dead, wounded, or missing.[8] After pursuing the Confederate general Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
into Maryland, Maj. Gen. George B
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Colonel (United States)
In the United States Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force, colonel /ˈkɜːrrnəl/ is the most senior field grade military officer rank, immediately above the rank of lieutenant colonel and immediately below the rank of brigadier general. It is equivalent to the naval rank of captain in the other uniformed services.[n 1] The pay grade for colonel is O-6. The insignia of the rank of colonel, as seen on the right, is worn on the officer's left side (a mirror-image version is worn on the right side, such that the eagle always faces forward to the wearer's front; the left-side version is also worn centered on fatigue caps, helmets, Army ACU & ECWCS breasts, inter alia)
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Lieutenant Colonel (United States)
In the United States Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force, a lieutenant colonel is a field grade military officer rank just above the rank of major and just below the rank of colonel. It is equivalent to the naval rank of commander in the other uniformed services. The pay grade for the rank of lieutenant colonel is O-5. In the United States armed forces, the insignia for the rank consists of a silver oak leaf, with slight stylized differences between the Army/Air Force version and the Navy/Marine Corps version. Promotion to lieutenant colonel is governed by Department of Defense policies derived from the Defense Officer Personnel Management Act (DOPMA) of 1980 for officers in the Active Component and its companion Reserve Officer Personnel Management Act (ROPMA) for officers in the Reserve Component (e.g., Reserve and National Guard)
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