HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Neighbourhood Watch
A neighborhood watch or neighbourhood watch (see spelling differences), also called a crime watch or neighbourhood crime watch, is an organized group of civilians devoted to crime and vandalism prevention within a neighborhood. The aim of neighborhood watch includes educating residents of a community on security and safety and achieving safe and secure neighborhoods
[...More...]

"Neighbourhood Watch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Inminban
Inminban (Chosŏn'gŭl: 인민반; Hancha: 人民班; RR: inmin-ban; MR: inmin-ban; meaning "neighbourhood units" or "people's units") is a Neighbourhood Watch-like form of cooperative local organization in North Korea. No North Korean person exists outside the inminban system; everyone is a member.[1]Contents1 History 2 Structure 3 See also 4 References4.1 Works cited5 External linksHistory[edit] The inminban network was established by the late 1960s. Every North Korean woman who does not have a full-time job is required to participate in inminban activities, which include cleaning public toilets, tidying up the neighbourhood, manufacturing small items at home, and occasionally going to the countryside to do agricultural work. This made women without jobs nearly as busy as those with jobs, and was said to contribute to high female participation in the North Korea workforce
[...More...]

"Inminban" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
[...More...]

"New York Times" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sanford, Florida
Sanford is a city in the central region of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Florida and is the county seat of Seminole
Seminole
County. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 53,570. Known as the "Historic Waterfront Gateway City," Sanford sits on the southern shore of Lake Monroe at the head of navigation on the St. Johns River. Native Americans first settled in the area thousands of years before the city was formed. The Seminoles would arrive in the area in the 18th century. During the Second Seminole
Seminole
War in 1836, the United States Army
United States Army
established Camp Monroe and built a road that is currently known as Mellonville Avenue
[...More...]

"Sanford, Florida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Florida
Florida
Florida
(/ˈflɒrɪdə/ ( listen); Spanish for "land of flowers") is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States. The state is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the northwest by Alabama, to the north by Georgia, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the south by the Straits of Florida. Florida
Florida
is the 22nd-most extensive (65,755 sq mi—170,304 km2), the 3rd-most populous (20,984,400 inhabitants),[11] and the 8th-most densely populated (384.3/sq mi—121.0/km2) of the U.S. states. Jacksonville is the most populous municipality in the state and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. The Miami metropolitan area is Florida's most populous urban area. Tallahassee is the state's capital. About two-thirds of Florida
Florida
occupies a peninsula between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean
[...More...]

"Florida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

George Zimmerman
George Michael Zimmerman (born October 5, 1983) is an American known for the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin
Trayvon Martin
on February 26, 2012, in Sanford, Florida. On July 13, 2013, he was acquitted of all charges in Florida v. George Zimmerman. As of 2015[update], he remained the subject of media interest due to ongoing controversy over the Trayvon Martin case
[...More...]

"George Zimmerman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Self-defense
Self-defence (self-defense in some varieties of English) is a countermeasure that involves defending the health and well-being of oneself from harm.[1] The use of the right of self-defense as a legal justification for the use of force in times of danger is available in many jurisdictions, but the interpretation varies widely.[2]Contents1 Physical1.1 Unarmed 1.2 Armed2 Mental 3 Other forms3.1 Avoidance 3.2 De-escalation 3.3 Personal alarms4 Self-defense
Self-defense
education4.1 ACS Algerien combat système 4.2 Farid Guendouze système5 Legal aspects5.1 Application of the law6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPhysical[edit] Ju-Jitsu
Ju-Jitsu
defence against a knife attack. Berlin
Berlin
1924Physical self-defense is the use of physical force to counter an immediate threat of violence. Such force can be either armed or unarmed
[...More...]

"Self-defense" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Second-degree Murder
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract
Contract
killing Crime
Crime
of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder
[...More...]

"Second-degree Murder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Racial Profiling
Racial profiling is the act of suspecting or targeting a person of a certain race based on a stereotype about their race, rather than on individual suspicion.[1][2] More commonly in the United States, racial profiling is referred to regarding its use by law enforcement at the local, state, and federal levels, and its use leading to discrimination against people in the African American, Asian, Latino, South Asian, Arab, and Muslim
M

[...More...]

"Racial Profiling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United States Department Of Justice
The United States
United States
Department of Justice
Justice
(DOJ), also known as the Justice
Justice
Department, is a federal executive department of the U.S. government, responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice in the United States, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries. The department was formed in 1870 during the Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
administration. In its early years, the DOJ vigorously prosecuted Ku Klux Klan
Ku Klux Klan
members. The Department of Justice
Justice
administers several federal law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation
Federal Bureau of Investigation
(FBI), and the Drug Enforcement Administration
Drug Enforcement Administration
(DEA)
[...More...]

"United States Department Of Justice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hate Crime
A hate crime (also known as a bias-motivated crime or bias crime[1]) is a prejudice-motivated crime which occurs when a perpetrator targets a victim because of his or her membership (or perceived membership) in a certain social group or race. Examples of such groups can include and are almost exclusively limited to: sex, ethnicity, disability, language, nationality, physical appearance, religion, gender identity or sexual orientation.[2][3][4] Non-criminal actions that are motivated by these reasons are often called "bias incidents". " Hate crime" generally refers to criminal acts which are seen to have been motivated by bias against one or more of the social groups listed above, or by bias against their derivatives
[...More...]

"Hate Crime" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hispanic
The term Hispanic
Hispanic
(Spanish: hispano or hispánico) broadly refers to the people, nations, and cultures that have a historical link to Spain. It commonly applies to countries once under colonial possession by the Spanish Empire
Spanish Empire
following Spanish colonization of the Americas, parts of the Asia-Pacific region and Africa, principally what are today the countries of Hispanic America
Hispanic America
where Spanish is the predominant or official language and their cultures are heavily derived from Spain
Spain
although with strong local indigenous or other foreign influences
[...More...]

"Hispanic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sheila Jackson Lee
Sheila Jackson Lee
Sheila Jackson Lee
(born January 12, 1950) is an American politician. She is currently the U.S. Representative for Texas's 18th congressional district, serving since 1995. The district includes most of central Houston. She is a member of the Democratic Party.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Early political career 3 U.S
[...More...]

"Sheila Jackson Lee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

City Watch
A city guard, city watch, town guard, or town watch was a law enforcement and security formation found in many countries and historical periods, usually subordinate to the local municipal government. Historically many cities had their own guard formations, which doubled as police and military forces in times of need. With the unification of laws and centralization of state power (e.g. the Municipal Police Act of 1844 in New York City, United States), such formations became increasingly incorporated into state-run police forces. City guard in fiction[edit]Ankh-Morpork City WatchSee also[edit]Municipal Guards City guard (Poland) Colombo Town Guard Militia Shurta Schutterij Watchman (law enforcement)This law enforcement agency article is a stub
[...More...]

"City Watch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Background Check
A background check or background investigation is the process of looking up and compiling criminal records, commercial records, and financial records of an individual or an organization.[1]Contents1 Purpose 2 Pre-employment screening2.1 United Kingdom 2.2 Poland 2.3 Asia/Oceania 2.4 The market 2.5 Types of checks 2.6 Regulation 2.7 United States2.7.1 Laws2.7.1.1 Florida2.7.2 Types of checks3 Possible information included 4 Controversies 5 Public records pay sites 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPurpose[edit] Background checks are often requested by employers on job candidates for employment screening, especially on candidates seeking a position that requires high security or a position of trust, such as in a school, courthouse, hospital, financial institution, airport, and government. These checks are traditionally administered by a government agency for a nominal fee, but can also be administered by private companies
[...More...]

"Background Check" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Block Parent Program
The Block Parent Program (French: Le Programme Parents-Secours) is a large, volunteer-based, child safety and crime prevention program operating across Canada. Participants in the program (Block Parents) place signs on their homes indicating that the house is a police-screened, safe home for community members in distress, particularly children. If someone is in need of help and sees a block parent sign, they know there is someone home who can help them and call the appropriate emergency service if necessary. The program now includes 300,000 participants.Contents1 History 2 Local and regional decline 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The program began in London, Ontario
Ontario
in 1968. Independent programs began appearing across Canada
Canada
until 1983 when a national committee was formed and the national Block Parents Program of Canada
Canada
was created in 1986
[...More...]

"Block Parent Program" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.