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Negative Dialectics
Negative Dialectics
Negative Dialectics
(German: Negative Dialektik) is a 1966 book by Theodor W. Adorno.Contents1 Summary 2 Influence 3 References 4 Further readingSummary[edit] Adorno sought to update the philosophical process known as the dialectic, freeing it from traits previously attributed to it that he believed to be fictive. For Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, the dialectic was a process of realization that things contain their own negation and through this realization the parts are sublated into something greater. Adorno's dialectics rejected this positive element wherein the result was something greater than the parts that preceded and argued for a dialectics which produced something essentially negative. Adorno wrote that, " Negative Dialectics
Negative Dialectics
is a phrase that flouts tradition
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Siegfried Kracauer
Siegfried Kracauer
Siegfried Kracauer
(February 8, 1889 – November 26, 1966) was a German writer, journalist, sociologist, cultural critic, and film theorist. He has sometimes been associated with the Frankfurt School of critical theory.Contents1 Biography 2 Theories on memory 3 Reception 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingBiography[edit] Born to a Jewish family in Frankfurt am Main, Kracauer studied architecture from 1907 to 1913, eventually obtaining a doctorate in engineering in 1914 and working as an architect in Osnabrück, Munich, and Berlin
Berlin
until 1920. Near the end of the First World War, he befriended the young Theodor W. Adorno, to whom he became an early philosophical mentor
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Privatism
Privatism is a generic term generally describing any belief that people have a right to the private ownership of certain things. There are many degrees of privatism, from the advocacy of limited private property over specific kinds of items (personal property) to the advocacy of unrestricted private property over everything; such as in anarcho-capitalism. Regarding public policy, it gives primacy to the private sector as the central agent for action, necessitates the social and economic benefits for private initiatives and competition, and "legitimizes the public consequences of private action".[1]Contents1 Left-wing political theory 2 Sociology 3 See also 4 ReferencesLeft-wing political theory[edit] In general, privatism is used in the context of left-wing politics to distinguish ideologies which support private ownership of an economy's means of production and those who desire abolishing it in favour of either collective ownership or common ownership
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Axel Honneth
Axel Honneth
Axel Honneth
(German: [aksl̩ ˈhɔnɛt]; born July 18, 1949) is a professor of philosophy at both the University of Frankfurt and Columbia University. He is also director of the Institut für Sozialforschung (Institute for Social Research) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.Contents1 Biography 2 Research 3 Works translated into English 4 Notes 5 See also 6 External linksBiography[edit] Honneth was born in Essen, West Germany
West Germany
on July 18, 1949, studied in Bonn, Bochum, Berlin
Berlin
and Munich
Munich
(under Jürgen Habermas), and taught at the Free University of Berlin
Berlin
and the New School before moving to the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University of Frankfurt in 1996
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Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
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Otto Kirchheimer
Otto Kirchheimer (German: [ˈkɪɐ̯çˌhaɪmɐ]; 11 November 1905 in Heilbronn
Heilbronn
– 22 November 1965 in New York City) was a German jurist of Jewish ancestry and political scientist of the Frankfurt School whose work essentially covered the state and its constitution.[1] Kircheimer worked as a research analyst at the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the forerunner of the CIA, starting in World War II and continuing to 1952.[2] Research[edit] He is father of the concept of the catch-all party. Otto Kirchheimer's conception of the catch-all party was part of his more comprehensive theory of party transformation, encompassing four interrelated political processes. By tracing the development of the catch-all thesis and placing it within the wider context of Kirchheimer's complete work, it is possible to reconstruct a more precise understanding of what Kirchheimer meant by the catch-all concept, which itself remains highly contested
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Critical Theory
Critical Theory is a school of thought that stresses the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture by applying knowledge from the social sciences and the humanities. As a term, Critical Theory has two meanings with different origins and histories: the first originated in sociology and the second originated in literary criticism, whereby it is used and applied as an umbrella term that can describe a theory founded upon critique; thus, the theorist Max Horkheimer described a theory as critical insofar as it seeks "to liberate human beings from the circumstances that enslave them".[1] In sociology and political philosophy, the term Critical Theory describes the neo- Marxist philosophy
Marxist philosophy
of the Frankfurt School, which was developed in Germany in the 1930s
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Freudo-Marxism
Freudo- Marxism
Marxism
is a loose designation for philosophies that have been informed by or have attempted to synthesize the works of Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund Freud.Contents1 Early Freudo-Marxism1.1 Wilhelm Reich2 The Frankfurt School2.1 Marcuse's Eros and Civilization
Eros and Civilization
(1955) 2.2 Fromm and The Sane Society3 Lacan and Marxism3.1 Althusser 3.2 Žižek4 Commodity and sexual fetishism 5 See also5.1 Related thinkers6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly Freudo-Marxism[edit] The beginnings of Freudo- Marxist
Marxist
theorizing took place in the 1920s in Germany and the Soviet Union. The Soviet philosopher V. Yurinets and the Freudian analyst Siegfried Bernfeld
Siegfried Bernfeld
both discussed the topic
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Popular Culture Studies
Popular culture studies is the academic discipline studying popular culture from a critical theory perspective. It is generally considered as a combination of communication studies and cultural studies. The first department to offer Popular Culture
Culture
bachelor's and master's degrees is the Bowling Green State University Department of Popular Culture
Culture
which was founded by Ray B. Browne.[1] Following the work of the Frankfurt School, popular culture has come to be taken more seriously as a terrain of academic inquiry and has also helped to change the outlooks of more established disciplines. Conceptual barriers between so-called high and low culture have broken down, accompanying an explosion in scholarly interest in popular culture, which encompasses such diverse media as comic books, television, and the Internet
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Identity (social Science)
In psychology, identity is the qualities, beliefs, personality, looks and/or expressions that make a person (self-identity) or group (particular social category or social group). The process of identity can be creative or destructive.[1] A psychological identity relates to self-image (one's mental model of oneself), self-esteem, and individuality
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Friedrich Pollock
Friedrich
Friedrich
may refer to: Names[edit] Friedrich
Friedrich
(surname), people with the surname Friedrich Friedrich
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Communicative Rationality
Communicative rationality, or communicative reason (German: kommunikative Rationalität), is a theory or set of theories which describes human rationality as a necessary outcome of successful communication. In particular, it is tied to the philosophy of Karl-Otto Apel, Jürgen Habermas, and their program of universal pragmatics, along with its related theories such as those on discourse ethics and rational reconstruction. This view of reason is concerned with clarifying the norms and procedures by which agreement can be reached, and is therefore a view of reason as a form of public justification. According to the theory of communicative rationality, the potential for certain kinds of reason is inherent in communication itself. Building from this, Habermas has tried to formalize that potential in explicit terms
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Legitimation Crisis
Legitimation crisis
Legitimation crisis
refers to a decline in the confidence of administrative functions, institutions, or leadership.[1][2][3] The term was first introduced in 1973 by Jürgen Habermas, a German sociologist and philosopher.[4] Habermas expanded upon the concept, claiming that with a legitimation crisis, an institution or organization does not have the administrative capabilities to maintain or establish structures effective in achieving their end goals.[3][4] The term itself has been generalized by other scholars to refer not only to the political realm, but to organizational and institutional structures as well.[3][5] While there is
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
(/ˈheɪɡəl/;[15] German: [ˈɡeːɔɐ̯k ˈvɪlhɛlm ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈheːɡəl]; August 27, 1770 – November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher and an important figure of German idealism. He achieved wide renown in his day and, while primarily influential within the continental tradition of philosophy, has become increasingly influential in the analytic tradition as well.[16] Although Hegel remains a divisive figure, his canonical stature within Western philosophy
Western philosophy
is universally recognized. Hegel's principal achievement is his development of a distinctive articulation of idealism sometimes termed "absolute idealism",[17] in which the dualisms of, for instance, mind and nature and subject and object are overcome. His philosophy of spirit conceptually integrates psychology, the state, history, art, religion, and philosophy
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Plato
Plato
Plato
(/ˈpleɪtoʊ/;[a][1] Greek: Πλάτων[a] Plátōn, pronounced [plá.tɔːn] in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423[b] – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece
Classical Greece
and the founder of the Academy
Academy
in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world
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