HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Nebovirus
Nebovirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Caliciviridae. Bovine serve as natural hosts. There is currently only one species in this genus: the type species Newbury-1 virus. Diseases associated with this genus include: necrotizing hepatitis leading to fatal hemorrhages.[1][2]Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Structure 3 Life cycle 4 References 5 External linksTaxonomy[edit] Group: ssRNA(+)Order: UnassignedFamily: CaliciviridaeGenus: NebovirusNewbury-1 virus[2] Structure[edit] Viruses
Viruses
in Nebovirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral geometries, and T=3, T=1 symmetry. The diameter is around 35 nm. Genomes are linear and non-segmented, around 8.3kb in length.[1]Genus Structure Symmetry Capsid Genomic arrangement Genomic segmentationNebovirus Icosahedral T=1, T=3 Non-enveloped Linear MonopartiteLife cycle[edit] Viral replication is cytoplasmic
[...More...]

"Nebovirus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virus Classification
Virus
Virus
classification is the process of naming viruses and placing them into a taxonomic system. Similar to the classification systems used for cellular organisms, virus classification is the subject of ongoing debate and proposals. This is mainly due to the pseudo-living nature of viruses, which is to say they are non-living particles with some chemical characteristics similar to those of life, or non-cellular life. As such, they do not fit neatly into the established biological classification system in place for cellular organisms. Viruses are mainly classified by phenotypic characteristics, such as morphology, nucleic acid type, mode of replication, host organisms, and the type of disease they cause
[...More...]

"Virus Classification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Globuloviridae
Globuloviridae is a family of viruses. Pyrobaculum and thermoproteus archaea serve as natural hosts. There are currently only two species in this family, divided among 1 genera (Globulovirus).[1][2]Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Structure 3 Life cycle 4 References 5 External linksTaxonomy[edit] Group: dsDNAOrder: UnassignedFamily: GlobuloviridaeGenus: Globulovirus Pyrobaculum spherical virus Thermoproteus tenax spherical virus 1[2] Structure[edit] Viruses
Viruses
in Globuloviridae are enveloped, with spherical geometries. The diameter is around 100 nm. Genomes are linear and non-segmented, around 20-30kb in length.[1]Genus Structure Symmetry Capsid Genomic arrangement Genomic segmentationGlobulovirus SphericalEnveloped Circular MonopartiteLife cycle[edit] Viral replication is cytoplasmic. Dna templated transcription is the method of transcription
[...More...]

"Globuloviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Papillomaviridae
Alphapapillomavirus Betapapillomavirus Chipapillomavirus Deltapapillomavirus Dyodeltapapillomavirus Dyoepsilonpapillomavirus Dyoetapapillomavirus Dyoiotapapillomavirus Dyokappapillomavirus Dyolambdapapillomavirus Dyomupapillomavirus Dyonupapillomavirus Dyoomikronpapillomavirus Dyopipapillomavirus Dyorhopapillomavirus Dyosigmapapillomavirus Dyothetapapillomavirus Dyoxipapillomavirus Dyozetapapillomavirus Epsilonpapillomavirus Etapapillomavirus Gammapapillomavirus Iotapapillomavirus Kappapapillomavirus Lambdapapillomavirus Mupapillomavirus Nupapillomavirus Omegapapillomavirus Omikronpapillomavirus Phipapillomavirus Pipapillomavirus Psipapillomavirus Rhopapillomavirus Sigmapapillomavirus Taupapillomavirus Thetapapillomavirus Upsilonpapillomavirus Xipapillomavirus Zetapapillomavirus Papillomaviridae
Papillomaviridae
is an ancient taxonomic family of non-enveloped DNA viruses, collectively known as papillomaviruses
[...More...]

"Papillomaviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Papovavirus
Polyomavirus PapillomavirusA papovavirus is any member of the former virus family of Papovaviridae.[1] They are mainly associated with various neoplasms in mammals.[1] The family of Papovaviridae is no longer used in recent taxonomy, but is split into the Papillomaviridae
Papillomaviridae
and the Polyomaviridae.[2] The name derives from three abbreviations: Pa for papillomavirus, Po for polyomavirus, and Va for "vacuolating" (simian vacuolating virus 40 or SV40, which is now known to be part of the polyomavirus genus). Papovaviruses are
[...More...]

"Papovavirus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polyomaviridae
Polyomaviridae
Polyomaviridae
is a family of viruses whose natural hosts are primarily mammals and birds.[1][2] As of the most recent (2016) taxonomy release by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, there were 77 recognized species in this family contained within four genera, as well as three species that could not be assigned to a genus.[2] Of these, 13 species are known to infect humans.[3][4] Most of these viruses, such as
[...More...]

"Polyomaviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rhizidiovirus
Rhizidiovirus is a genus of viruses. Stramenopiles[1] (fungi and hyphochytridiomycota) serve as natural hosts. There is only one species in this genus: the type species Rhizidiomyces virus.[2][3]Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Structure 3 Life cycle 4 References 5 External linksTaxonomy[edit] Group: dsDNAOrder: UnassignedFamily: UnassignedGenus: RhizidiovirusRhizidiomyces virus[3] Structure[edit] Viruses
Viruses
in Rhizidiovirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral, round, and isometric geometries. The diameter is around 60 nm.[2] The genome is non segmented, linear double stranded DNA and ~25.5 kilobases in length. It has a guanine + cytosine content of 42%
[...More...]

"Rhizidiovirus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ampullaviridae
Ampullaviridae is a family of viruses that infect archaea of the genus Acidianus.[1] Only one genus in this family has been described, Ampullavirus, which contains one species, Acidianus bottle-shaped virus.[2] The name of the family and genus is derived from the Latin word for bottle, ampulla, due to the virions having the shape of a bottle. The family was first described during an investigation of the microbial flora of hot springs in Italy. Structure and genome[edit] Ampullaviruses have unique morphology, with the virions being bottle-shaped with one narrow end that smoothly expands into a wider end for an overall length of about 230 nm and width of about 75 nm at the broad end. The narrow end projects beyond the viral envelope and is likely used to inject the viral DNA into host cells. The broad end possesses about 20 thin filaments, each that are regularly distributed in a ring
[...More...]

"Ampullaviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baculoviridae
Alphabaculovirus Betabaculovirus Deltabaculovirus Gammabaculovirus Baculoviridae
Baculoviridae
is a family of viruses. Arthropods, lepidoptera, hymenoptera, diptera, and decapoda serve as natural hosts. There are currently 66 species in this family, divided among 4 genera.[1][2] Baculoviruses are known to infect invertebrates, with over 600 host species having been described. Immature (larval) forms of moth species are the most common hosts, but these viruses have also been found infecting sawflies, mosquitoes, and shrimp. Although baculoviruses are capable of entering mammalian cells in culture[3] they are not known to be capable of replication in mammalian or other vertebrate animal cells. Starting in the 1940s they were used and studied widely as biopesticides in crop fields
[...More...]

"Baculoviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bicaudaviridae
Bicaudaviridae is a family of viruses. Genus acidianus serve as natural hosts. There was only one genus (Bicaudavirus) and one species in this family: the type species Acidianus two-tailed virus.[1][2] until the Sulfolobus tengchongensis spindle-shaped virus 1 (STSV-1) was regarded to belong to this family also.[3]Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Structure 3 Life cycle 4 History 5 References 6 External linksTaxonomy[edit] Group: dsDNAOrder: UnassignedFamily: BicaudaviridaeGenus: BicaudavirusAcidianus two-tailed virus[2] Structure[edit] Viruses
Viruses
in Bicaudaviridae are enveloped, with lemon-shaped geometries. Genomes are circular, around 62kb in length. The genome has 72 open reading frames.[1]Genus Structure Symmetry Capsid Genomic arrangement Genomic segmentationBicaudavirus Lemon-shapedCircular MonopartiteLife cycle[edit] Viral replication is cytoplasmic
[...More...]

"Bicaudaviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clavaviridae
Clavaviridae is a family of double-stranded viruses that infect archaea. This family was first described by the team led by D. Prangishvili in 2010. There is one genus in this family (Clavavirus). Within this genus, only a single species has been described to date: Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1. The name is derived from the Latin
Latin
word clava meaning stick. Virology[edit] The virons are bacilliform in shape and 143 nanometers (nm) in length and 15.8 nm in diameter.[1][2] One end is pointed and the other is rounded. The structure of the APBV1 virion has been solved by cryo-electron microscopy to near-atomic resolution, revealing how the helical particle is built from an alpha-helical major capsid protein with a unique structural fold.[2] The genome is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule of 5.3 kb
[...More...]

"Clavaviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Corticoviridae
Corticovirus
Corticovirus
is a genus of viruses in the family Corticoviridae.[2] Corticoviruses are bacteriophages; that is, their natural hosts are bacteria. The genus contains only one species, the type species Pseudoalteromonas virus PM2 (also known as Pseudoalteromonas phage PM2 or bacteriophage PM2).[2][3] The name is derived from Latin cortex, corticis (meaning 'crust' or 'bark')
[...More...]

"Corticoviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fuselloviridae
Fuselloviridae is a family of viruses. Sulfolobus
Sulfolobus
species, specifically shibatae, solfataricus, and islandicus, serve as natural hosts
[...More...]

"Fuselloviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Guttaviridae
Guttaviridae is a family of viruses. Sulfolobus
Sulfolobus
newzealandicus serve as natural hosts. There are currently only two species in this family, divided among 2 genera.[1][2] The name is derived from the Latin gutta, meaning 'droplet'.[3][4][5]Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Structure 3 Life cycle 4 References 5 External linksTaxonomy[edit] Group: dsDNAOrder: UnassignedFamily: GuttaviridaeGenus: Alphaguttavirus Sulfolobus
Sulfolobus
newzealandicus droplet-shaped virusGenus: BetaguttavirusAeropyrum pernix ovoid virus 1[2] Structure[edit] Viruses
Viruses
in the family Guttaviridae are enveloped. The diameter is around 70–95 nm, with a length of 110–185 nm. Genomes are circular, around 20kb in length.[2][3] The virons consist of a coat, a core, a nucleocapsid, and projecting fibers at the pointed end
[...More...]

"Guttaviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dinodnavirus
Heterocapsa circularisquama DNA virus 01 Dinodnavirus is a genus of viruses that infect dinoflagellates.[1] This genus belongs to the clade of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses. The name is derived from 'dino' (dinoflagellate) and DNA (from its genome). The type species is Heterocapsa circularisquama DNA virus 01. Virology[edit] The virus has an isosahedral capsid ~200 nanometers in diameter. The genome is a single molecule of double stranded DNA of a ~356-kilobases. It infects the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa circularisquama. During replication virions emerge from a specific cytoplasm compartment - the 'viroplasm' - which is created by the virus.[2] Taxonomy[edit] The taxonomic position of this genus is unclear at present. The type species was originally thought to belong to the family Phycodnaviridae
[...More...]

"Dinodnavirus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hytrosaviridae
Glossinavirus Muscavirus Hytrosaviridae is a family of double stranded DNA viruses that infect insects.[1] The name is derived from Hytrosa, sigla from the Greek Hypertrophia for 'hypertrophy' and 'sialoadenitis' for 'salivary gland inflammation.'Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Host species 4 Virology 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] The viruses in this family are non occluded, enveloped, rod-shaped virons measuring 500–1,000 nanometers (nm) in length and 50–100 nm in diameter. The virons contain at least 35 polypeptides which range in size from 10 to 200 kiloDaltons. The genome is a circular double stranded DNA molecule ranging in size from 120 to 190 kilobases
[...More...]

"Hytrosaviridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.