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Nazca Plains
Coordinates: 14°43′00″S 75°08′00″W / 14.71667°S 75.13333°W / -14.71667; -75.13333Lines and Geoglyphs of Nasca and Palpa UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site1953 aerial photograph by Maria Reiche, one of the first archaeologists to study the linesLocation Nazca
Nazca
Desert, PeruCriteria Cultural: i, iii, ivReference 700Inscription 1994 (18th Session)Area 75,358.47 haCoordinates 14°43′33″S 75°8′55″W / 14.72583°S 75.14861°W / -14.72583; -75.14861Location of Nazca
Nazca
Lines in Peru.The Nazca
Nazca
Lines /ˈnæzkɑː/ are a series of large ancient geoglyphs in the Nazca
Nazca
Desert, in southern Peru. The largest figures are up to 370 m (1,200 ft) long.[1] They were designated as a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site in 1994
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Anthropologist
An anthropologist is a person engaged in the practice of anthropology. Anthropology
Anthropology
is the study of various aspects of humans within past and present societies.[1][2][3] Social anthropology, cultural anthropology, and philosophical anthropology study the norms and values of societies. Linguistic anthropology studies how language affects social life, while economic anthropology studies human economic behavior. Biological (physical), forensic, and medical anthropology study the biological development of humans, the application of biological anthropology in a legal setting, and the study of diseases and their impacts on humans over time, respectively.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Further reading 4 See also 5 ReferencesEducation[edit] Anthropologists usually cover a breadth of topics within anthropology in their undergraduate education, and then proceed to specialize in topics of their own choice at the graduate level
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Erich Von Däniken
Erich Anton Paul von Däniken (/ˈɛrɪk fɒn ˈdɛnɪkɪn/; German: [ˈeːrɪç fɔn ˈdɛːnɪkən]; born 14 April 1935) is a Swiss author of several books which make claims about extraterrestrial influences on early human culture, including the best-selling Chariots of the Gods?, published in 1968. Von Däniken is one of the main figures responsible for popularizing the "paleo-contact" and ancient astronauts hypotheses. The ideas put forth in his books are rejected by a majority of scientists and academics, who categorize his work as pseudohistory, pseudoarchaeology, and pseudoscience.[1][2][3] Von Däniken later became a co-founder of the Archaeology, Astronautics and SETI Research Association (AAS RA)
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Ancient Astronauts
"Ancient astronauts" (or "ancient aliens") refers to the pseudoscientific[1] idea that intelligent extraterrestrial beings visited Earth
Earth
and made contact with humans in antiquity and prehistoric times.[2] Proponents suggest that this contact influenced the development of modern cultures, technologies, and religions. A common position is that deities from most, if not all, religions are extraterrestrial in origin, and that advanced technologies brought to Earth
Earth
by ancient astronauts were interpreted as evidence of divine status by early humans.[3][4] The idea that ancient astronauts existed is not taken seriously by academics, and has received no credible attention in peer reviewed studies.[5] Well-known proponents in the latter half of the 20th century who have written numerous books or appear regularly in mass media include Erich von Däniken, Zecharia Sitchin, Robert K. G
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Joe Nickell
Joe Nickell
Joe Nickell
(born December 1, 1944) is an American prominent skeptic and investigator of the paranormal. He has helped expose such famous forgeries as the purported diary of Jack the Ripper. In 2002 he was one of a number of experts asked by scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
to evaluate the authenticity of the manuscript of Hannah Crafts' The Bondwoman's Narrative (1853–1860), possibly the first novel by an African-American
African-American
woman.[1] At the request of document dealer and historian, Seth Keller, Nickell analyzed documentation in the dispute over the authorship of "The Night Before Christmas", ultimately supporting the Clement Clarke Moore
Clement Clarke Moore
claim. Nickell is Senior Research Fellow for the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI) and writes regularly for their journal, the Skeptical Inquirer
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Scientific American
Scientific American
Scientific American
(informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 170 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).Contents1 History 2 International editions 3 First issue 4 Editors 5 Special
Special
issues 6 Scientific American
Scientific American
50 award 7 Website 8 Columns 9 Television 10 Books 11 Scientific and political debate 12 Awards 13 Top 10 Science Stories of the Year 14 Controversy 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksHistory[edit] Scientific American
Scientific American
was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845[2] as a four-page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S
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Iron Oxide
Iron
Iron
oxides are chemical compounds composed of iron and oxygen. All together, there are sixteen known iron oxides and oxyhydroxides.[1] Iron
Iron
oxides and oxide-hydroxides are widespread in nature, play an important role in many geological and biological processes, and are widely used by humans, e.g., as iron ores, pigments, catalysts, in thermite (see the diagram) and hemoglobin. Common rust is a form of iron(III) oxide. Iron
Iron
oxides are widely used as inexpensive, durable pigments in paints, coatings and colored concretes. Colors commonly available are in the "earthy" end of the yellow/orange/red/brown/black range
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Lime (material)
Lime is a calcium-containing inorganic mineral in which carbonates, oxides, and hydroxides predominate. In the strict sense of the term, lime is calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. It is also the name of the natural mineral (native lime) CaO which occurs as a product of coal seam fires and in altered limestone xenoliths in volcanic ejecta.[1] The word lime originates with its earliest use as building mortar and has the sense of sticking or adhering.[2] These materials are still used in large quantities as building and engineering materials (including limestone products, cement, concrete, and mortar), as chemical feedstocks, and for sugar refining, among other uses. Lime industries and the use of many of the resulting products date from prehistoric times in both the Old World
Old World
and the New World
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Erosion
In earth science, erosion is the action of surface processes (such as water flow or wind) that removes soil, rock, or dissolved material from one location on the Earth's crust, and then transport it away to another location[1] (not to be confused with weathering which involves no movement). This natural process is caused by the dynamic activity of erosive agents, that is, water, ice (glaciers), snow, air (wind), plants, animals, and humans. In accordance with these agents, erosion is sometimes divided into water erosion, glacial erosion, snow erosion, wind (aeolic) erosion, zoogenic erosion, and anthropogenic erosion[2].The particulate breakdown of rock or soil into clastic sediment is referred to as physical or mechanical erosion; this contrasts with chemical erosion, where soil or rock material is removed from an area by its dissolving into a solvent (typically water), followed by the flow away of that solution
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Earthworks (engineering)
Earthworks are engineering works created through the processing of parts of the earth's surface involving quantities of soil or unformed rock.Contents1 Types of excavation 2 Civil engineering use 3 Military use 4 Equipment 5 Mass haul planning 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksTypes of excavation[edit]Earth moving equipment (circa 1922)Flattened and leveled construction site
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Yamagata University
Yamagata University
Yamagata University
(YU) (山形大学, Yamagata daigaku) is a national university located in the Japanese cities of Yamagata, Yonezawa, and Tsuruoka in Yamagata Prefecture. The Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
released World University Rankings 2016-2017. Yamagata University
Yamagata University
ranked 600-800th out of the top 980 universities in the world.[2] In addition, YU is ranked the tenth place (10th) in Japanese research organization ranking, announcement on April 2017 , by the analysis of the number of the highly cited papers in a "Materials Science" field alone in the Japanese local national university. Ranking by Thomson Reuters[3][4] The university was established in 1949, but its origin can be traced back to the Yamagata Normal School (山形師範学校, Yamagata Shihan Gakkō), a public teacher-training institution, founded in 1878 in Yamagata City
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Spot Satellite
SPOT (French: Satellite Pour l’Observation de la Terre,[1] lit. "Satellite for observation of Earth") is a commercial high-resolution optical imaging Earth observation satellite
Earth observation satellite
system operating from space. It is run by Spot Image, based in Toulouse, France. It was initiated by the CNES
CNES
(Centre national d'études spatiales – the French space agency) in the 1970s and was developed in association with the SSTC (Belgian scientific, technical and cultural services) and the Swedish National Space Board
Swedish National Space Board
(SNSB). It has been designed to improve the knowledge and management of the Earth
Earth
by exploring the Earth's resources, detecting and forecasting phenomena involving climatology and oceanography, and monitoring human activities and natural phenomena
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Ethnologist
Ethnology
Ethnology
(from the Greek ἔθνος, ethnos meaning "nation"[1]) is the branch of anthropology that compares and analyses the characteristics of different peoples and the relationship between them (cf
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Astronomical Object
An astronomical object or celestial object is a naturally occurring physical entity, association, or structure that exists in the observable universe.[1] In astronomy, the terms "object" and "body" are often used interchangeably. However, an astronomical body or celestial body is a single, tightly bound contiguous entity, while an astronomical or celestial object is a complex, less cohesively bound structure, that may consist of multiple bodies or even other objects with substructures. Examples for astronomical objects include planetary systems, star clusters, nebulae and galaxies, while asteroids, moons, planets, and stars are astronomical bodies
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Archaeologist
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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