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Natsume Sōseki
Natsume Sōseki
Natsume Sōseki
(夏目 漱石, February 9, 1867 – December 9, 1916), born Natsume Kinnosuke (夏目 金之助), was a Japanese novelist. He is best known for his novels Kokoro, Botchan, I Am a Cat and his unfinished work Light and Darkness. He was also a scholar of British literature
British literature
and composer of haiku, kanshi, and fairy tales. From 1984 until 2004, his portrait appeared on the front of the Japanese 1000 yen note
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Japanese Name
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation
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Hibiya High School
Coordinates: 35°42′55″N 139°45′08″E / 35.71529°N 139.75227°E / 35.71529; 139.75227 Tokyo
Tokyo
Metropolitan Hibiya High School (東京都立日比谷高等学校, Tōkyō Toritsu Hibiya Kōtōgakkō) is a Japanese high school founded in 1878 as the Tokyo First Middle School or Tokyo
Tokyo
First Junior High School (東京府立第一中学校, Tōkyō Furitsu Daiichi Chūgakkō)
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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University College, London
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Cambridge
280,000 [1] - • Ethnicity (2011)[2] 66% White British 1.4% White Irish 15% White Other 1.7% Black British 3.2% Mixed Race 11% British Asian & Chinese 1.6% otherDemonym(s) CantabrigianTime zone Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich Mean Time
(UTC+0) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcode CB1 – CB5Area code(s) 01223ONS code 12UB (ONS) E07000008 (GSS)OS grid reference TL450588Website www.cambridge.gov.uk Cambridge
Cambridge
(/ˈkeɪmbrɪdʒ/[3] KAYM-brij) is a university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam
River Cam
approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of London
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Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
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Kumamoto, Kumamoto
Kumamoto
Kumamoto
(熊本市, Kumamoto-shi) is the capital city of Kumamoto Prefecture on the island of Kyushu, Japan. As of April 1, 2017, the city has an estimated population of 737,812[3] and a population density of 1,900 persons per km2. The total area is 389.53 km2. Greater Kumamoto
Kumamoto
(熊本都市圏) had a population of 1,460,000, as of the 2000 census
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Shikoku
Shikoku
Shikoku
(四国, "four provinces") is the smallest (225 km or 139.8 mi long and between 50 and 150 km or 31.1 and 93.2 mi wide) and least populous (3.8 million as of 2015[update]) of the four main islands of Japan, located south of Honshu
Honshu
and east of the island of Kyushu. Its ancient names include Iyo-no-futana-shima (伊予之二名島), Iyo-shima (伊予島), and Futana-shima (二名島)
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Lafcadio Hearn
Patrick Lafcadio Hearn
Lafcadio Hearn
(/hɜːrn/; Greek: Πατρίκιος Λευκάδιος Χερν; 27 June 1850 – 26 September 1904), known also by the Japanese name Koizumi Yakumo (小泉 八雲), was a writer, known best for his books about Japan, especially his collections of Japanese legends and ghost stories, such as Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things
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Literary Criticism
Literary criticism
Literary criticism
(or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of literature's goals and methods. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely from book reviewing, is a matter of some controversy. For example, the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism[1] draws no distinction between literary theory and literary criticism, and almost always uses the terms together to describe the same concept
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Renku
Renku (連句, "linked verses"), or haikai no renga (俳諧の連歌, "comic linked verse"),[1] is a Japanese form of popular collaborative linked verse poetry. It is a development of the older Japanese poetic tradition of ushin renga, or orthodox collaborative linked verse. At renku gatherings participating poets take turns providing alternating verses of 17 and 14 morae. Initially haikai no renga distinguished itself through vulgarity and coarseness of wit, before growing into a legitimate artistic tradition, and eventually giving birth to the haiku form of Japanese poetry
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Chinese Classics
Chinese classic texts or canonical texts (simplified Chinese: 中国古典典籍; traditional Chinese: 中國古典典籍; pinyin: Zhōngguó gǔdiǎn diǎnjí) refers to the Chinese texts which originated before the imperial unification by the Qin dynasty
Qin dynasty
in 221 BC, particularly the "Four Books and Five Classics" of the Neo-Confucian tradition, themselves a customary abridgment of the "Thirteen Classics". All of these pre-Qin texts were written in classical Chinese. All three canons are collectively known as the classics (t 經, s 经, jīng, lit. "warp").[1] Chinese classic texts may more broadly refer to texts written either in vernacular Chinese or in the classical Chinese that was current until the fall of the last imperial dynasty, the Qing, in 1912
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Literary Magazine
A literary magazine is a periodical devoted to literature in a broad sense. Literary magazines usually publish short stories, poetry, and essays, along with literary criticism, book reviews, biographical profiles of authors, interviews and letters. Literary magazines are often called literary journals, or little magazines, terms intended to contrast them with larger, commercial magazines.[1]Contents1 History 2 Online literary magazines 3 Little magazines 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Nouvelles de la république des lettres is regarded as the first literary magazine; it was established by Pierre Bayle
Pierre Bayle
in France
France
in 1684.[2] Literary magazines became common in the early part of the 19th century, mirroring an overall rise in the number of books, magazines, and scholarly journals being published at that time
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Chinese Literature
The history of Chinese literature
Chinese literature
extends thousands of years, from the earliest recorded dynastic court archives to the mature vernacular fiction novels that arose during the Ming Dynasty
Ming Dynasty
to entertain the masses of literate Chinese. The introduction of widespread woodblock printing during the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
(618–907) and the invention of movable type printing by Bi Sheng (990–1051) during the Song Dynasty (960–1279) rapidly spread written knowledge throughout China
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Shinjuku, Tokyo
Shinjuku
Shinjuku
(新宿区, Shinjuku-ku, "New Lodge") is a special ward in Tokyo, Japan. It is a major commercial and administrative centre, housing the Northern half of the busiest railway station in the world ( Shinjuku
Shinjuku
Station) and the Tokyo
Tokyo
Metropolitan Government Building, the administration centre for the government of Tokyo. As of 2015, the ward has an estimated population of 337,556, and a population density of 18,517 people per km²
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