HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

National Women's Political Caucus
The National Women's Political Caucus
National Women's Political Caucus
(NWPC or the Caucus) describes itself as a multi-partisan grassroots organization in the United States dedicated to recruiting, training, and supporting women who seek elected and appointed offices at all levels of government. The Caucus offers campaign training for candidates, campaign managers, and trainers, as well as technical assistance and advice. State and local chapters provide support to candidates running at state and local levels by helping raise money and providing crucial hands-on volunteer assistance.[1]Contents1 History 2 Leadership 3 Activities 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] NWPC was founded on July 10, 1971 to increase the number of women in all aspects of political life – as elected and appointed officials, as judges in state and federal courts, and as delegates to national conventions
[...More...]

"National Women's Political Caucus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Richard Nixon
Vice President of the United StatesMotorcade attack Kitchen Debate Operation 40 1960 presidential electionPost-vice presidency1962 gubernatorial bid "Last press conference"President of the United StatesPresidencyFirst term1968 presidential electioncampaign1st InaugurationNixon Doctrine War policy Visit to ChinaNixonomicsNixon shockEPA Environmental policy Clean Water NOAA War on Cancer War on DrugsSecond term1972 presidential electionConvention2nd InaugurationDétente Paris Peace Accords Endangered Species Act Watergate scandalTimeline Tapes United States
United States
v. NixonWatergate Committee Impeachment
Impeachment
processSpeechPost-presidencyPardon The Nixon Interviews Nixon v
[...More...]

"Richard Nixon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Political Action Committee
In the United States
United States
and Canada, a political action committee (PAC) is a type of organization that pools campaign contributions from members and donates those funds to campaign for or against candidates, ballot initiatives, or legislation.[1][2] The legal term PAC has been created in pursuit of campaign finance reform in the United States. This term is quite specific to all activities of campaign finance in the United States. Democracies of other countries use different terms for the units of campaign spending or spending on political competition (see political finance). At the U.S
[...More...]

"Political Action Committee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress Control Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Field Enterprises
Field Enterprises, Inc. was a private holding company that operated from the 1940s to the 1980s, founded by Marshall Field III
Marshall Field III
and others,[1] whose main assets were the Chicago
Chicago
Sun and Parade magazine. For various periods of time, Field Enterprises also owned publishers Simon & Schuster and Pocket Books, broadcaster Field Communications, and the World Book Encyclopedia. It also operated a syndication service, Field Newspaper Syndicate,[2] whose most popular offering was the comic strip Steve Canyon. History[edit] Field had founded the Chicago
Chicago
Sun and the Chicago
Chicago
Sun Syndicate in late 1941.[3] Comic-strip historian Allan Holtz
Allan Holtz
has written regarding the origins of the Field Syndicate and its relationship to the rest of the company:Field . .
[...More...]

"Field Enterprises" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
[...More...]

"Chicago" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

World Book Encyclopedia
The World Book Encyclopedia
Encyclopedia
is an encyclopedia published in the United States. The company's "mission is to cultivate lifelong learners—because today’s explorers are tomorrow’s leaders." [1] The encyclopedia was designed to cover major areas of knowledge uniformly, but it shows particular strength in scientific, technical, and medical subjects.[2] It is based in Chicago, Illinois. The first edition (1917) contained eight volumes
[...More...]

"World Book Encyclopedia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

501(c)(3)
A 501(c)(3) organization is a corporation, trust, unincorporated association, or other type of organization that is exempt from federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of Title 26 of the United States Code. It is the most common type of the 29 types of 501(c) nonprofit organizations in the United States. Many charitable non-profits in the United States that Americans commonly know of, and often make donations to, are 501(c)(3) organizations,[according to whom?] ranging from charitable foundations to universities and churches
[...More...]

"501(c)(3)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Nonprofit
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
[...More...]

"Nonprofit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Women's Rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
are the rights and entitlements claimed for women and girls worldwide, and formed the basis for the women's rights movement in the nineteenth century and feminist movement during the 20th century. In some countries, these rights are institutionalized or supported by law, local custom, and behavior, whereas in others they are ignored and suppressed
[...More...]

"Women's Rights" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
[...More...]

"English Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Virginia Allan
Virginia Allan was born in Wyandotte, Michigan on October 21, 1916. She received both an AB and MA from the University of Michigan, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. After completing her education and working on a WWII assembly line, Allan began her career as an educator teaching English in the Dearborn and Detroit school systems.[1] She went on to serve as the Chair of President Nixon's Taskforce on Women's Rights and Responsibilities in 1969. In 1972, she was named the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs. She was also the Director of the Graduate School of Women's Studies at George Washington University from 1977-1983.[2] Upon her retirement in 1993, she moved to Sarasota, Florida, where she died on August 8, 1999.[3][4][5] References[edit]^ "BHL: Virginia R. Allan papers". quod.lib.umich.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-13.  ^ "Virginia Allan" (PDF). Michigan Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 12, 2017.  ^ "Virginia Allan University Libraries"
[...More...]

"Virginia Allan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

White House Task Force On Women's Rights And Responsibilities
The Task Force on Women's Rights and Responsibilities was appointed by President Richard Nixon on October 1, 1969
[...More...]

"White House Task Force On Women's Rights And Responsibilities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.