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National Theatre (Washington, D.C.)
The National Theatre is located in Washington, D.C., and is a venue for a variety of live stage productions with seating for 1,676. Despite its name, it is not a governmentally funded national theatre, but operated by a private, non-profit organization.Contents1 History 2 Performers 3 Operations 4 Citations 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] This historic playhouse was founded on December 7, 1835, by William Corcoran and other prominent citizens who wanted the national capital to have a first-rate theatre. The theatre's initial production was Man of the World. The theatre has been in almost continuous operation since, at the same Pennsylvania Avenue location a few blocks from the White House. Its name was changed at times to "Grover's National Theatre," and "Grover's Theatre," as management changed. Famed actor Joseph Jefferson
Joseph Jefferson
managed the theatre at one time
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Amadeus
Amadeus is a play by Peter Shaffer, which gives a highly fictionalized account of the lives of the composers Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
and Antonio Salieri. First performed in 1979, Amadeus was inspired by a short 1830 play by Alexander Pushkin
Alexander Pushkin
called Mozart and Salieri (which was also used as the libretto for an opera of the same name by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1897). In the play, significant use is made of the music of Mozart, Salieri and other composers of the period
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Desegregation
Desegregation
Desegregation
is the process of ending the separation of two groups usually referring to races. This is most commonly used in reference to the United States. Desegregation
Desegregation
was long a focus of the Civil Rights Movement, both before and after the United States Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education, particularly desegregation of the school systems and the military (see Military history of African Americans). Racial integration
Racial integration
of society was a closely related goal.Contents1 In the U.S. military1.1 Early history 1.2 World Wars I and II 1.3 Modern history2 In U.S. housing law 3 In the U.S. education system3.1 Asian Americans4 See also 5 References 6 External linksIn the U.S. military[edit] Early history[edit] Starting with King Philip's in the 17th century, blacks served alongside whites in an integrated environment North American
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Walt Disney
Walter Elias Disney
Elias Disney
(/ˈdɪzni/;[1] December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966) was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards
Academy Awards
earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry
National Film Registry
by the Library of Congress. Born in Chicago
Chicago
in 1901, Disney developed an early interest in drawing. He took art classes as a boy and got a job as a commercial illustrator at the age of 18
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Fantasia (1940 Film)
Fantasia
Fantasia
is a 1940 American animated film produced by Walt Disney
Walt Disney
and released by Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Productions. With story direction by Joe Grant and Dick Huemer, and production supervision by Ben Sharpsteen, it is the third Disney animated feature film. The film consists of eight animated segments set to pieces of classical music conducted by Leopold Stokowski, seven of which are performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra. Music critic and composer Deems Taylor
Deems Taylor
acts as the film's Master of Ceremonies, providing a live-action introduction to each animated segment. Disney settled on the film's concept as work neared completion on The Sorcerer's Apprentice, an elaborate Silly Symphonies short designed as a comeback role for Mickey Mouse, who had declined in popularity
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Roger L. Stevens
Roger Lacey Stevens (March 12, 1910 – February 2, 1998) was an American theatrical producer, arts administrator, and a real estate executive. He was the founding Chairman
Chairman
of both the Kennedy Center
Kennedy Center
for the Performing Arts (1961), and National Endowment for the Arts (1965).Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Stage productions 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Detroit, Michigan, Stevens was educated at The Choate School (now Choate Rosemary Hall) in Wallingford, Connecticut. He was about to enter Harvard University
Harvard University
but his father's financial difficulties ended his plan. He attended the University of Michigan
Michigan
for a year before dropping out. He then worked on a Ford assembly line and at a gas station during the Depression.[1] In 1934, he joined a Detroit
Detroit
real estate firm
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National Press Club (USA)
The National Press Club is a professional organization and business center for journalists and communications professionals. It is located in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
Its membership consists of journalists, former journalists, government information officers, and those considered to be regular news sources. It has gatherings with invited speakers from public life as well as a venue open to the public to host business meetings, news conferences, industry gatherings and social events.External audioSample of Luncheon
Luncheon
Speakers National Press Club Luncheon
Luncheon
Speakers, Harry S. Truman, four press conferences - May 10, 1954, April 12, 1958, December 8, 1958, November 2, 1961, Library of Congress[1] National Press Club Luncheon
Luncheon
Speakers, A
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Tiber Creek
Tiber
Tiber
Creek or Tyber Creek was originally called Goose Creek. It is a tributary of the Potomac River
Potomac River
in Washington, D.C.. It was a free-flowing creek until 1815 when it was channeled to become part of the Washington City Canal
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Crazy For You (musical)
Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Musical Laurence Olivier Award for Best New Musical Laurence Olivier Award for Best Musical Revival Bibi Ferreira Award for Best MusicalCrazy for You is a romantic comedy musical with a book by Ken Ludwig, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and music by George Gershwin. Billed as "The New Gershwin Musical Comedy", it is largely based on the songwriting team’s 1930 musical, Girl Crazy, but incorporates songs from several other productions as well
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Richard L. Coe
Richard Livingston Coe (1914–1995), born in New York City, was a theater and cinema critic for The Washington Post
The Washington Post
for more than forty years. Mr. Coe became known as one of the most influential theater critics outside New York City. He was the leading theater reviewer in Washington when that city was a major tryout stop for shows headed for New York. It was the postwar period that was considered Broadway's last golden era of prolific production. Consequently, it was often Mr. Coe's reviews that directors used to help smooth out productions before heading to the harsher lights of Broadway. Among the many shows Mr. Coe reviewed at Washington's National Theater were David Merrick's original productions of "Hello, Dolly!" and "Carnival." He also reviewed the premieres of plays by Neil Simon, Tennessee Williams and William Inge. He often said that his interest in music and theater began during his years at the choir school of the Cathedral of St
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Hello, Dolly! (musical)
Hello, Dolly! is a 1964 musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart. Based on Thornton Wilder's 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers
The Merchant of Yonkers
(which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955), the musical follows the story of Dolly Gallagher Levi (a strong-willed matchmaker), as she travels to Yonkers, New York, to find a match for the miserly "well-known unmarried half-a-millionaire" Horace Vandergelder. In doing so she persuades his niece, his niece's intended, and Horace's two clerks to travel to New York City. Hello, Dolly! was first produced on Broadway by David Merrick in 1964, winning a record-tying (tied with South Pacific) 10 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, a record held for 37 years
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Pearl Bailey
Pearl Mae Bailey (March 29, 1918 – August 17, 1990) was an American actress and singer. After appearing in vaudeville she made her Broadway debut in St. Louis Woman
St. Louis Woman
in 1946.[1] She won a Tony Award
Tony Award
for the title role in the all-black production of Hello, Dolly! in 1968. In 1986, she won a Daytime Emmy award for her performance as a fairy godmother in the ABC Afterschool Special, Cindy Eller: A Modern Fairy Tale. Her rendition of "Takes Two to Tango" hit the top ten in 1952
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Ethel Barrymore
Ethel Barrymore
Ethel Barrymore
(born Ethel Mae Blythe; August 15, 1879 – June 18, 1959) was an American actress and a member of the Barrymore family
Barrymore family
of ac
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