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National Review Online
National Review
National Review
(NR) is an American semi-monthly conservative editorial magazine focusing on news and commentary pieces on political, social, and cultural affairs. The magazine was founded by the author William F. Buckley Jr.
William F. Buckley Jr.
in 1955.[3] It is currently edited by Rich Lowry. Since its founding, the magazine has played a significant role in the development of conservatism in the United States, helping to define its boundaries[3] and promoting fusionism while establishing itself as a leading voice on the American right.[3][4][5] The online version, National Review
National Review
Online, is edited by Charles C
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National Review (other)
National Review
National Review
may refer to: National Review
National Review
(founded 1955), American biweekly contemporary political magazine based in New York City
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Libertarians
Libertarianism
Libertarianism
(from Latin: libertas, meaning "freedom") is a collection of political philosophies and movements that uphold liberty as a core principle.[1] Libertarians seek to maximize political freedom and autonomy, emphasizing freedom of choice, voluntary association, and individual judgment; they believe in individual rights.[2][3][4] Libertarians share a skepticism of authority and state power, but they diverge on the scope of their opposition to existing political and economic systems
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L. Brent Bozell Jr.
Leo Brent Bozell
Bozell
Jr. (/boʊˈzɛl/; January 15, 1926 – April 15, 1997) was an American conservative activist and Roman Catholic writer.Contents1 Biography1.1 Family 1.2 Early life 1.3 Catholic conservative 1.4 Conservative Catholic 1.5 Pro-life activity 1.6 Illnesses and death2 Works 3 References 4 SourcesBiography[edit] Family[edit] His parents were Lois (née Robbins) and Leo B. Bozell, the co-founder of Bozell
Bozell
Worldwide.[1] His wife was Patricia Lee Buckley, sister of William F. Buckley, and their 10 children include L
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Harry V. Jaffa
Harry Victor Jaffa (October 7, 1918 – January 10, 2015) was an American political philosopher, historian, columnist and professor. He was the Professor
Professor
Emeritus at Claremont McKenna College
Claremont McKenna College
and Claremont Graduate University and a distinguished fellow of the Claremont Institute. Robert P. Kraynak says his "life work was to develop an American application of Leo Strauss's revival of natural-right philosophy against the relativism and nihilism of our times."[4] Jaffa wrote topics ranging from Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas to Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill and natural law. He has been published in the Claremont Review of Books, the Review of Politics, National Review, and the New York Times
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Garry Wills
Garry Wills
Garry Wills
(born May 22, 1934) is an American author, journalist, and historian, specializing in American history, politics, and religion, especially the history of the Catholic Church
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John Dos Passos
John Roderigo Dos Passos (/dɒsˈpæsəs, -sɒs/;[1][2] January 14, 1896 – September 28, 1970) was an American novelist and artist active in the first half of the twentieth century. Born in Chicago, Illinois, he graduated from Harvard College
Harvard College
in 1916. He was well-traveled, visiting Europe
Europe
and the Middle East, where he learned about literature, art, and architecture. During World War I, he was an ambulance driver for American volunteer groups in Paris and Italy before joining the United States Army
United States Army
Medical Corps. In 1920 his first novel, One Man's Initiation: 1917, was published, and in 1925 his novel, Manhattan Transfer, became a commercial success
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Lionel Trilling
Lionel Mordecai Trilling (July 4, 1905 – November 5, 1975) was an American literary critic, short story writer, essayist, and teacher. He was one of the leading U.S. critics of the 20th century who traced the contemporary cultural, social, and political implications of literature. With his wife Diana Trilling (née Rubin), whom he married in 1929, he was a member of the New York Intellectuals and contributor to the Partisan Review.Contents1 Academic life 2 Partisan Review
Partisan Review
and the "New York Intellectuals" 3 Critical and literary works 4 Politics4.1 Liberal 4.2 Neoconservative 4.3 Moderate5 Works by Trilling 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksAcademic life[edit] Lionel Trilling was born in Queens, New York, the son of Fannie (née Cohen), who was from London, and David Trilling, a tailor from Bialystok
Bialystok
in Poland.[1] His family was Jewish
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Barry Goldwater
Barry Morris Goldwater
Morris Goldwater
(January 2, 1909[1] – May 29, 1998) was an American politician, businessman, and author who was a five-term United States
United States
Senator from Arizona
Arizona
(1953–65, 1969–87) and the Republican Party's nominee for President of the United States
United States
in 1964. Despite his loss of the 1964 presidential election in a landslide, Goldwater is the politician most often credited with sparking the resurgence of the American conservative political movement in the 1960s. While he had supported other federal civil rights measures, Goldwater was a vocal opponent of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; he believed it to be an overreach by the federal government
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Traditionalist Catholic
Traditionalist Catholicism
Traditionalist Catholicism
is a movement of Catholics
Catholics
in favour of restoring many or all of the customs, traditions, liturgical forms, public and private devotions and presentations of the teaching of the Catholic Church before the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
(1962–65). They are commonly associated with an attachment to the eucharistic liturgy often called the Tridentine, Traditional Latin or extraordinary form of the Mass. In general, Traditionalist Catholics
Catholics
were disturbed by the liturgical transformations of the Second Vatican Council, arguing that it stripped the liturgy of its outward sacredness and made it too Protestant, eroding faith in the Real Presence
Real Presence
of Christ in the Eucharist
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Triumph (magazine)
Triumph was a monthly American magazine published by L. Brent Bozell, Jr. from 1966 to 1975. It commented on religious, philosophical, and cultural issues from the traditionalist Catholic
Catholic
perspective.Contents1 Origin 2 History 3 Decline 4 Christendom
Christendom
College 5 Contributors 6 References 7 SourcesOrigin[edit] Bozell founded Triumph in 1966 as a magazine for American Catholic conservatives following the Second Vatican Council. Bozell, previously an editor for National Review
National Review
founded by his brother-in-law William F. Buckley, Jr., was put off by the insufficient respect the largely Catholic
Catholic
editorial board of the magazine paid to Catholic
Catholic
social teaching. Specifically, he protested the prevailing attitude of "Mater si, magistra no" towards Pope John XXIII's papal encyclicals Mater et Magistra and Pacem in terris
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Fusionism (politics)
Fusionism
Fusionism
is an American political term for the philosophical and political combination or "fusion" of traditionalist and social conservatism with political and economic right-libertarianism.[1] The philosophy is most closely associated with Frank Meyer.[2]Contents1 Intellectual founding and positions 2 Political history 3 List of prominent fusionists 4 Criticism4.1 List of critics5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksIntellectual founding and positions[edit] The philosophy of "fusionism" was developed at National Review magazine during the 1950s under the editorship of William F. Buckley, Jr. and is most identified with his associate editor Frank Meyer
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John Birch Society
The John Birch Society
John Birch Society
(JBS) is a self-described conservative advocacy group supporting anti-communism and limited government.[2][3][4] It has been described as a radical right and far-right organization.[5][6][7][8] Businessman and founder Robert W. Welch, Jr. (1899–1985) developed an organizational infrastructure in 1958 of chapters nationwide. Its main activity in the 1960s, said Rick Perlstein, "comprised monthly meetings to watch a film by Welch, followed by writing postcards or letters to government officials linking specific policies to the Communist menace".[9] After an early rise in membership and influence, efforts by those such as conservative William F. Buckley, Jr.
William F

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Frank Meyer (political Philosopher)
Frank Straus Meyer (/ˈmaɪ.ər/; 1909–1972) was an American philosopher and political activist best known for his theory of "fusionism" – a political philosophy that unites elements of libertarianism and traditionalism into a philosophical synthesis which is posited as the definition of modern American conservatism. Meyer's philosophy was presented in two books, primarily In Defense of Freedom: A Conservative Credo (1962) and also in a collection of his essays, The Conservative Mainstream (1969). Fusionism has been summed up by E. J. Dionne, Jr
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George Wallace
George Corley Wallace Jr. (August 25, 1919 – September 13, 1998) was an American politician and the 45th Governor of Alabama, having served two nonconsecutive terms and two consecutive terms as a Democrat: 1963–1967, 1971–1979 and 1983–1987. Wallace has the third longest gubernatorial tenure in post-Constitutional U.S. history, at 16 years and four days.[1] He was a U.S. presidential candidate for four consecutive elections, in which he sought the Democratic Party nomination in 1964, 1972, and 1976, and was the American Independent Party candidate in the 1968 presidential election
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Nativism (politics)
Nativism is the political policy of promoting the interests of native inhabitants against those of immigrants.[1] However, this is currently more commonly described as an anti-immigrant position.[2] In scholarly studies nativism is a standard technical term. The term is typically not accepted by those who hold this political view, however. Dindar (2010) wrote "nativists..
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