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National Presbyterian Church
The National Presbyterian Church
National Presbyterian Church
is a Christian
Christian
congregation of approximately 1,500 members of all ages from the greater metropolitan Washington, D.C., area. The mission statement of the church is "Leading People to Become Faithful Followers of Jesus Christ Together in God’s World"[1] The congregation meets at 4101 Nebraska Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. Designated as the national church of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), the building complex occupies a 12-acre campus comprising six separate structures, including a main cathedral in the Neo-Gothic
Neo-Gothic
style—the third largest religious center in the nation’s capital. President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
laid the cornerstone October 14, 1967.[2][3] The site also includes the National Presbyterian School, which provides pre-school-to-Grade 6 education
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Tiffany Glass
Tiffany glass
Tiffany glass
refers to the many and varied types of glass developed and produced from 1878 to 1933 at the Tiffany Studios in New York, by Louis Comfort Tiffany
Louis Comfort Tiffany
and a team of other designers, including Frederick Wilson and Clara Driscoll.[1][2] In 1865, Tiffany traveled to Europe, and in London he visited the Victoria and Albert Museum, whose extensive collection of Roman and Syrian glass made a deep impression on him. He admired the coloration of medieval glass and was convinced that the quality of contemporary glass could be improved upon
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Payap University
Payap University (Thai: มหาวิทยาลัยพายัพ; RTGS: Phayap), established in 1974, is a private institution founded by the Church of Christ in Thailand
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Blood Pressure
Blood
Blood
pressure (BP) is the pressure of circulating blood on the walls of blood vessels. Used without further specification, "blood pressure" usually refers to the pressure in large arteries of the systemic circulation. Blood
Blood
pressure is usually expressed in terms of the systolic pressure (maximum during one heart beat) over diastolic pressure (minimum in between two heart beats) and is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg), above the surrounding atmospheric pressure (considered to be zero for convenience). Blood
Blood
pressure is one of the vital signs, along with respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and body temperature
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CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR) is an emergency procedure that combines chest compressions often with artificial ventilation in an effort to manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous blood circulation and breathing in a person who is in cardiac arrest. It is recommended in those who are unresponsive with no breathing or abnormal breathing, for example, agonal respirations.[1] CPR involves chest compressions for adults between 5 cm (2.0 in) and 6 cm (2.4 in) deep and at a rate of at least 100 to 120 per minute.[2] The rescuer may also provide artificial ventilation by either exhaling air into the subject's mouth or nose (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation) or using a device that pushes air into the subject's lungs (mechanical ventilation)
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Defibrillator
Defibrillation
Defibrillation
is a treatment for life-threatening cardiac dysrhythmias, specifically ventricular fibrillation (VF) and non-perfusing ventricular tachycardia (VT).[1][2] A defibrillator delivers a dose of electric current (often called a countershock) to the heart. This depolarizes a large amount of the heart muscle, ending the dysrhythmia
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Red Cross
The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
is an international humanitarian movement with approximately 97 million volunteers, members and staff worldwide[2] which was founded to protect human life and health, to ensure respect for all human beings, and to prevent and alleviate human suffering. The movement consists of several distinct organizations that are legally independent from each other, but are united within the movement through common basic principles, objectives, symbols, statutes and governing organisations. The movement's parts are:The International Committee of the Red Cross
International Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC) is a private humanitarian institution founded in 1863 in Geneva, Switzerland, in particular by Henry Dunant
Henry Dunant
and Gustave Moynier
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John Jay Hopkins
John Jay Hopkins (October 15, 1893 – May 3, 1957) was founder and president of General Dynamics
General Dynamics
from 1952 to 1957. Hopkins was born in Santa Ana, California. He was assistant to the Treasury Secretary. In 1937, he joined Electric Boat
Electric Boat
as a lawyer, and eventually became director. In 1948, as president of Electric Boat, he purchased Canadair
Canadair
and created General Dynamics from that foundation in 1952. Hopkins created the golf World Cup, which began as the Canada Cup in 1953, and donated the trophy for the event. Hopkins died in Washington, DC.[2] References[edit]^ Diario de Las Palmas, 4 de Mayo de 1957 ^ Staff report (May 4, 1957). J.J. HOPKINS DIES; INDUSTRIALIST, 63; Chairman of Billion-Dollar General Dynamics
General Dynamics
Corp. Built Navy's Nautilus. PROPOSED ATOM PLANS. Winner of '53 Alger Award. Also Worked on Missiles
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General Dynamics Corporation
General Dynamics
General Dynamics
Corporation
Corporation
(GD) is an American aerospace and defense multinational corporation formed by mergers and divestitures. It is the world's fifth-largest defense contractor based on 2012 revenues.[2] General Dynamics
General Dynamics
is headquartered in West Falls Church, Fairfax County, Virginia.[3][4][5] The company has changed markedly in the post–Cold War era of defense consolidation. It has four main business segments: Marine Systems, Combat Systems, Information Systems Technology, and Aerospace. General Dynamics' former Fort Worth Division manufactured the F-16 Fighting Falcon until 1993, which was one of the Western world's most-produced jet fighters
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Grammy
"Hello"Record of the Year "24K Magic"A Grammy Award
Grammy Award
(stylized as GRAMMY, originally called Gramophone Award), or Grammy, is an award presented by The Recording Academy
The Recording Academy
to recognize achievement in the mainly English-language music industry. The annual presentation ceremony features performances by prominent artists, and the presentation of those awards that have a more popular interest
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Noah’s Ark
Noah's Ark
Noah's Ark
(Hebrew: תיבת נח‎; Biblical Hebrew: Tevat Noaḥ) is the vessel in the Genesis flood narrative
Genesis flood narrative
( Genesis chapters 6–9) by which God
God
spares Noah, his family, and a remnant of all the world's animals from a world-engulfing flood.[1][2] According to Genesis, God gave Noah
Noah
instructions for building the ark. Seven days before the deluge, God
God
told Noah
Noah
to enter the ark with his household and the animals. The story goes on to describe the ark being afloat for 150 days and then coming to rest on the Mountains of Ararat
Mountains of Ararat
and the subsequent receding of the waters.[3] The story is repeated, with variations, in the Quran, where the ark appears as Safina Nūḥ (Arabic: سفينة نوح‎ "Noah's boat")
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2011 Virginia Earthquake
The 2011 Virginia earthquake occurred on August 23 at 1:51:04 p.m. local time in the Piedmont region of the US state of Virginia. The epicenter, in Louisa County, was 38 mi (61 km) northwest of Richmond and 5 mi (8 km) south-southwest of the town of Mineral. It was an intraplate earthquake with a magnitude of 5.8 and a maximum perceived intensity of VII (Very strong) on the Mercalli intensity scale. Several aftershocks, ranging up to 4.5 Mw in magnitude, occurred after the main tremor. With an estimated magnitude of 5.8,[4] it, along with a quake on the New York–Ontario border in 1944 and the 2016 earthquake near Pawnee, Oklahoma is tied as the largest to have occurred in the U.S., east of the Rocky Mountains, since an equivalent 1897 quake centered in Giles County in western Virginia.[5] The quake was felt across more than a dozen U.S. states and in several Canadian provinces, and was felt by more people than any other quake in U.S
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Cotswold Architecture
The Cotswold
Cotswold
style of architecture is a unique style based on houses from the Cotswold
Cotswold
region of England, and is sometimes called the storybook style, with buildings made in this form also sometimes referred to as Tudor cottages. Roofs made with pseudo-thatch, steep arch gables, and arched doorways are all common features of the Cotswold
Cotswold
style. Walls are usually sided in brick, stone, or stucco, and rooms are often small and irregularly shaped. Cotswold
Cotswold
houses often have a prominent chimney, often near the front door of the house. Cotswold
Cotswold
architecture is a subtype of the Tudor Revival
Tudor Revival
house style, and likely came to the United States as a result in a renewed interest in medieval housing styles
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New York Avenue Presbyterian Church
The New York Avenue Presbyterian Church
New York Avenue Presbyterian Church
in Washington, D.C., is a congregation of the Presbyterian Church (USA). The church was formed in 1859-60 but traces its roots to 1803 as the F Street Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and another congregation founded in 1820 on its current site, the Second Presbyterian Church. It is located at the intersection of 13th Street and New York Avenue in the city's northwest quadrant, four blocks from the White House
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