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National Museum Of Yemen
National Museum of Yemen
Yemen
in Sanaa.Old place of national museum of Yemen
Yemen
in Sanaa.The National Museum of Yemen
Yemen
in Sana'a, Yemen, was founded in 1971[1] in Dar al-Shukr
Dar al-Shukr
(Palace of Gratefulness) which is one of the Yemeni Imam Palaces. It is located near Qubbat al-Mutawakkil Mosque dome in Al-Tahreer Square in the city center. The Museum recently moved to a nearby building called Dar Al-Sada (Palace of Happiness). The relocation was made to the newly renovated Palace because it offers the necessary space to accommodate the increasing number of artifacts throughout the history of Yemen. The museum contains the artifact of ancient Yemen
Yemen
collected from different archaeological sites. The National Museum consists of the four-story building and its room has been reserved for the presentation of rare artifacts and monuments
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Yemen
Coordinates: 15°N 48°E / 15°N 48°E / 15; 48Republic of Yemen اَلْـجُـمْـهُـوْرِيَّـة الْـيَـمَـنِـيَّـة (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-YamanīyahFlagEmblemMotto:  الله، اَلْـوَطَـن، اَلـثَّـوْرَة، اَلْـوَحْـدَة (Arabic) "Allāh, al-Waṭan, ath-Thawrah, al-Waḥdah" "God, Country, Revolution, Unity"Anthem: اَلْـجُـمْـهُـوْرِيَّـة الْـمُـتَّـحِـدَة (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-Muttaḥidah (English: "United Republic")Location of  Yemen  (red)Capital and largest city Sana'aOfficial languages ArabicReligion IslamDemonym Yemeni, YemeniteGovernment Provisional government• President
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Mutawakkilite Kingdom Of Yemen
The Mutawakkilite Kingdom (Arabic: المملكة المتوكلية‎ al-Mamlakah al-Mutawakkilīyah), also known as the Kingdom of Yemen
Yemen
or, retrospectively, as North Yemen, was a state that existed between 1918 and 1962 in the northern part of what is now Yemen. Its capital was Sana'a
Sana'a
until 1948, then Taiz. From 1962 to 1970, it maintained control over portions of Yemen
Yemen
until finally defeated in the North Yemen
North Yemen
Civil War.Contents1 History 2 Flags 3 See also 4 References4.1 Sources5 External linksHistory[edit] Religious leaders of the Zaydi expelled forces of the Ottoman Empire from what is now northern Yemen
Yemen
by the middle of the 17th century but, within a century, the unity of Yemen
Yemen
was fractured due to the difficulty of governing Yemen's mountainous terrain
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History Of Yemen
Yemen
Yemen
is one of the oldest centers of civilization in the Near East.[1] Its relatively fertile land and adequate rainfall in a moister climate helped sustain a stable population, a feature recognized by the ancient Greek geographer Ptolemy, who described Yemen
Yemen
as Eudaimon Arabia
Arabia
(better known in its Latin translation, Arabia
Arabia
Felix) meaning "fortunate Arabia" or "Happy Arabia"
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Nahom
Nahom (/ˈneɪ.hʌm/[1]) is a place referenced in the Book of Mormon (1 Nephi 16:34) as one of the stops on the Old World
Old World
segment of Lehi's journey. This location is referred to as the place where Ishmael is laid to rest. It was also at this location that the path of Lehi's journey changed from a southern to an eastern direction before continuing toward the coast and the land (1 Nephi 17:1) Bountiful. (See Archaeology and the Book of Mormon.) Some LDS archaeologists believe that they have located the site of Nahom as a settlement and tribal area known anciently and still today as "NHM" (see below)
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Islamic
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
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Timna
Timna
Timna
(Arabic: تمنع‎) is an ancient city in Yemen, the capital of the Qataban
Qataban
kingdom; it is distinct from a valley in southern Israel that shares the same name.[1] During ancient times, Timna
Timna
was an important hub in the famous Incense Route, which supplied Arabian and Indian incense via camel caravan to ports on the Mediterranean Sea, most notably Gaza, and Petra. An American excavation of Timna
Timna
took place in the 1950s chronicled in the book " Qataban
Qataban
and Sheba" by the American archaeologist Wendell Phillips.[1] For a modern treatment of the city, see: Beihan References[edit]^ a b Phillips, Wendell (1955). Qataban
Qataban
and Sheba : exploring the ancient kingdoms on the Biblical spice routes of Arabia. New York: Harcourt Brace
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Kaminahu
Kaminahu
Kaminahu
(Old South Arabic: kmnhw; modern Kamna) is the name of an ancient South Arabian city in the northern al-Jawf region of present day Yemen, 107 km north-east of Sana'a
Sana'a
at about 1100 meters above sea level. In early times Kaminahu
Kaminahu
like other towns in al-Jawf such as Ḥaram and Nashan, was an independent city state. In about 715 BCE Kaminahu was conquered by Yitha’amar Watar I of Saba', after which it annexed Nashan
Nashan
and the neighbouring town of Manhiyat.[1] In the war against Nashan
Nashan
led by Karab El Watar. (ca
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Marib Dam
The Marib
Marib
Dam (Arabic: سـدّ مَـأرِب‎ Sadd Ma'rib, or sudd Ma'rib) is a dam blocking the Wadi
Wadi
Adhanah (also Dhana or Adhana), in the valley of Dhana in the Balaq Hills, Yemen. The current dam is close to the ruins of the Great Dam of Ma'rib, dating from around the 8th century BC.[1] It was one of the engineering wonders of the ancient world and a central part of the Sabaean and Himyarite kingdoms around Marib. There are also other important ancient dams in Yemen
Yemen
such as the Dam of Jufaynah, the Dam of Khārid, the Dam of Aḑra’ah, the Dam of Miqrān and the Dam of Yath’ān. Historically, Yemen
Yemen
has been recognized for the magnificence of its ancient water engineering
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Maṣna'at Māriya
Maṣna'at Māriya
Maṣna'at Māriya
(Arabic: مصنعة مارية‎), is the name of an ancient South Arabian location in Dhamar Governorate, Yemen. This pre-Islamic Himyarite
Himyarite
archaeological site is one of the largest in the Yemen. In the local language the name means the fortress of a word the meaning of which is disputed. The site lies 11 km west of the town of Dhamar. It is important as a large escarpment site partly of late pre-Islamic date. Inside one of the four city gates a text written Sabaic describes the roads in the area. See also[edit]Zafar, Yemen Himyarite
Himyarite
Kingdom Rulers of Sheba and Himyar Ancient history of YemenReferences[edit]Krista Lewis, Space and the Spice of Life: Food, Landscape, and Politics in Ancient Yemen, unpub. Dissertation, Univ. Chicago 2005. Paul Yule, Late Ḥimyarite Vulture Reliefs, in: eds. W. Arnold, M. Jursa, W. Müller, S
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Nashan
Nashan
Nashan
(modern day Al-Sawda',[1] Arabic: خربة السوداء‎) is the name of an ancient South Arabian city in the northern al-Jawf region of present day Yemen, in the territory of the ancient Kingdom of Ma'in. History[edit] Nashan, located near "Al-Khārid river" along with the neighboring Kaminahu, Ḥaram and Nashaq
Nashaq
in the region of al-Jawf, was a separate city state. Around 715 BC, it was initially annexed by Yitha'amar Watar I of Saba
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Nashaq
Nashaq
Nashaq
(modern day Al-Bayda', Arabic: خربة البيضاء‎) is the name of an ancient South Arabian city in the northern al-Jawf region of present day Yemen, in the territory of the ancient Kingdom of Ma'in.Contents1 History 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Bronze statue, found in Nashaq Karib'il Watar
Karib'il Watar
(around 685 BC) launched a campaign to capture Nashan and Nashaq
Nashaq
which lasted for three years. Eventually, he managed to subdue both cities, and to dedicate his triumph to his god Almaqah. In 25 BC, Nashaq
Nashaq
was mentioned as "Nescus"[note 1] during Aelius Gallus's expedition to Arabia Felix under orders of Augustus
Augustus
against Saba'
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Shabwa
The ancient city of Shabwa
Shabwa
(Arabic: شَـبْـوَة‎, translit. Shabwah) was the capital of Hadhramaut
Hadhramaut
at the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula. The ruins of the city are located in the north of modern Shabwah Governorate
Shabwah Governorate
of the Republic of Yemen.[1]Contents1 History 2 Ruins 3 See also3.1 Yemen4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Shabwa
Shabwa
was first settled in 13th century BC,[2] and was destroyed by the Himyarites at the end of the 3rd century AD.[3] Ruins[edit]Archaeological map of French excavations in ShabwaWithin the walls of the city are the remains of:[2]the royal palace named Shugair the temple of goddess Sian Dhu AleenSee also[edit]Middle EastYemen[edit] Shabwa
Shabwa
Museum Ma'rib ShibamReferences[edit]^ Eggenberger, David; Myers, Bernard Samuel (1959)
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Shaharah
Shahareh or Shehara (Arabic: شهارة‎) is a large mountain village and seat of Shaharah District
Shaharah District
of the 'Amran
'Amran
Governorate, Yemen. The village "lies at 2600 metres and overlooks mountainous bulging swells to the south and shimmering hot plains to the north."[1] The village, which lies on top a sharp mountain of the same name, Jabal Shaharah,[2] consists of several old stone houses and a cistern. The area is noted for its limestone arch footbridge, constructed in the 17th century by a local lord to connect two villages across a deep gorge.[3][1]References[edit]^ a b Walker, Jenny; Butler, Stuart (1 October 2010). Oman, UAE & Arabian Peninsula. Lonely Planet. p. 464. ISBN 978-1-74179-145-7. Retrieved 13 April 2012.  ^ Mackintosh-Smith, Tim (8 December 2011). Yemen. John Murray. p. 92. ISBN 978-1-84854-696-7. Retrieved 13 April 2012.  ^ "Bridge". Lonely Planet
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Sirwah
Sirwah
Sirwah
(OSA: Ṣrwḥ,[1] Arabic: صرواح خولان‎ Ṣirwāḥ Ḫawlān) was, after Ma'rib, the most important economical and political center of the Kingdom of Saba at the beginning of the 1st century BC, on the Arabian Peninsula. Ṣirwāḥ was surrounded by a fortified wall. The city layout inside the oasis included a number of large buildings. The ruins of Ṣirwāḥ are located 40 km west of Ma'rib. The town was well protected by its position in the mountains was well protected, but at the same time put limits on its development. As a result, Ṣirwāḥ quickly lost its position as a capital, which was taken over by Ma’rib, which was in an important economical center since it was located on the incense route. The town nevertheless remained an important centre for the Sabaeans, as shown by the large number of temple buildings. It was also the site chosen by King Yada'il Dharih I
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Citadel Of Rada'a
The Citadel of Rada'a (Arabic: قلعة رداع‎) is a historic castle in Yemen, located in the center of Rada'a District. The citadel sits at the highest point of the district, and consisted the original part of the city of Rada'a. The construction of the citadel precedes the introduction of Islam and dates back to the year 243 during the reign of Shammar Yahri'sh, the Himyarite king.[1] Specifically, the upper part of the citadel dates back to the Hymyarite era. Later the citadel was restored and renovated during the time of Omar bin Abdulwahhab of the Tahirids dynasty. During this time, the other parts of the citadel were added, and the construction was ended during the time of Imam Yahya Hamid al-Din, who used the castle as a prison for the rebels
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