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National Maritime Museum, Gdańsk
The National Maritime Museum in Gdańsk
Gdańsk
(Polish: Narodowe Muzeum Morskie) is a maritime museum in Gdańsk, Poland, established on 1 January 1962. It is dedicated to gathering, researching and preserving artifacts and documents concerning ship transport, international trade, fishing and culture of people working at sea, rivers and those ashore – as well as the dissemination of knowledge on maritime history of Poland
Poland
and its economy through the ages.[1]Granaries and SS SołdekHistory[edit] In 1958, a Museum's Friends Association was established, and with the participation of Przemysław Smolarek (employee of the National Museum, Szczecin), the Association organised an exhibition titled From a paddle to a nuclear drive in Artus Court
Artus Court
in Gdańsk
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Hel, Poland
Hel [xɛl] ( listen) (Kashubian Hél, German Hela) is a town in Puck County, Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland, located on the tip of the Hel Peninsula, some 33 kilometres (21 miles) from the Polish mainland.Contents1 History1.1 Early developments 1.2 Modern times2 Climate 3 See also 4 Images of Hel 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Early developments[edit] The Kashubian village of Hel was first mentioned in 1198 as a centre of herring trade area named Gellen. In one of the Danish chronicles of 1219 it is mentioned that a damaged ship of King Valdemar II the Victorious was set ashore on an "Island of Hel". By 13th century the village became one of the most important trade centres of the area, competing with the nearby town of Gdańsk
Gdańsk
(German: Danzig). It was then that the village was granted city rights by Duke
Duke
Świętopełk II the Great of Pomerania
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Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (
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Karol Olgierd Borchardt
Karol Olgierd Borchardt (25 March 1905 – 20 May 1986) was a Polish writer and captain of the Polish Merchant Marine.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born to Polish parents of German blood descent in Moscow, he spent the vast majority of his life and died in Gdynia. Borchardt gained a place in history of the Polish Merchant Marine
Polish Merchant Marine
as an officer on Polish transatlantic liners and training sail ships. During the World War II he served i/a on two Polish liners converted into troop transports (the m/v PIłSUDSKI and the m/v CHROBRY), and survived the loss of both. After the war he trained two generations of Polish officers. While demanding, he was also a warm-hearted and understanding teacher and an excellent lecturer
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Tall Ship
A tall ship is a large, traditionally-rigged sailing vessel. Popular modern tall ship rigs include topsail schooners, brigantines, brigs and barques. "Tall ship" can also be defined more specifically by an organization, such as for a race or festival.Contents1 History 2 Sail Training International2.1 Class A 2.2 Class B 2.3 Class C 2.4 Class D3 Earlier description of classes 4 Lost tall ships 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit]The tall ship KruzenshternTraditional rigging may include square rigs and gaff rigs, usually with separate topmasts and topsails. It is generally more complex than modern rigging, which utilizes newer materials such as aluminum and steel to construct taller, lightweight masts with fewer, more versatile sails
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Full-rigged Ship
A full-rigged ship or fully rigged ship is term of art denoting a sailing vessel's sail plan with three or more masts, all of them square-rigged.[1] A full-rigged ship is said to have a ship rig or be ship-rigged. Sometimes such a vessel will merely be called a ship in 18th- to early-19th-century and earlier usage, to distinguish it from other large three-masted blue-water working vessels such as barques, barquentines, fluyts etc. This full or ship-rig sail plan thus is a term of art[clarification needed] that differentiates such vessels as well from other working or cargo vessels with widely diverse alternative sail-plans such as galleons, cogs, sloops, caravels, schooners, brigs and carracks; some of which also have three masted variants (brigs, schooners, sloops, and galleons)
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Ore
An ore is an occurrence of rock or sediment that contains sufficient minerals with economically important elements, typically metals, that can be economically extracted from the deposit.[1] The ores are extracted from the earth through mining; they are then refined (often via smelting) to extract the valuable element, or elements. The grade or concentration of an ore mineral, or metal, as well as its form of occurrence, will directly affect the costs associated with mining the ore. The cost of extraction must thus be weighed against the metal value contained in the rock to determine what ore can be processed and what ore is of too low a grade to be worth mining. Metal ores are generally oxides, sulfides, silicates, or native metals (such as native copper) that are not commonly concentrated in the Earth's crust, or noble metals (not usually forming compounds) such as gold. The ores must be processed to extract the elements of interest from the waste rock and from the ore minerals
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Coal
Coal
Coal
is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. The harder forms, such as anthracite coal, can be regarded as metamorphic rock because of later exposure to elevated temperature and pressure. Coal
Coal
is composed primarily of carbon, along with variable quantities of other elements, chiefly hydrogen, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen.[1] Coal
Coal
is a fossil fuel that forms when dead plant matter is converted into peat, which in turn is converted into lignite, then sub-bituminous coal, after that bituminous coal, and lastly anthracite. This involves biological and geological processes
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Steamship
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines[1] that typically drive (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer (using a propeller or screw). As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steam ship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels. As steamships were less dependent on wind patterns, new trade routes opened up
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Kayak
A kayak is a small, narrow watercraft which is propelled by means of a double-bladed paddle. The word kayak originates from the Greenlandic word qajaq (IPA: [qajaq]). The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray and makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler. Inuit
Inuit
seal hunter in a kayak, armed with a harpoonInterior 360 degree photosphere of a kayak at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Vistula Lagoon
The Vistula
Vistula
Lagoon
Lagoon
(Polish: Zalew Wiślany; Russian: Калининградский залив or Kaliningradskiy Zaliv; German: Frisches Haff; Lithuanian: Aistmarės) is a brackish water lagoon on the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
roughly 56 miles (90 km) long, 6 to 15 miles (10 to 19 km) wide, and up to 17 feet (5 m) deep, separated from Gdańsk Bay
Gdańsk Bay
by the Vistula
Vistula
Spit. It is now known as the Vistula Bay or Vistula
Vistula
Gulf. The modern German name, Frisches Haff, is derived from an earlier form, Friesisches Haff.[1] The lagoon is a mouth of a few branches of the Vistula
Vistula
River, notably the Nogat, and the Pregolya
Pregolya
River
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Kąty Rybackie
Kąty Rybackie [ˈkɔntɨ rɨˈbat͡skʲɛ] (German: Bodenwinkel) is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Sztutowo, within Nowy Dwór Gdański County, Pomeranian Voivodeship, in northern Poland.[1] It lies approximately 4 kilometres (2 mi) north-east of Sztutowo, 16 km (10 mi) north-east of Nowy Dwór Gdański, and 39 km (24 mi) east of the regional capital Gdańsk. Bodenwinkel belonged to the Teutonic state and from 1466 to Polish Royal Prussia a part of Poland. 1773 the area became part of Prussia and belonged since 1871 to the German Reich. From 1920 to 1939 it came to the Free City of Danzig. In 1945 the village became Polish and got the name Kąty Rybackie
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Kashubians
The Kashubs (Kashubian: Kaszëbi; Polish: Kaszubi; German: Kaschuben; also spelled Kaszubians, Kassubians, Cassubians, Cashubes, and Kashubians, and formerly known as Kashubes)[6] are a West Slavic ethnic group[7] in Pomerelia, north-central Poland. Their settlement area is referred to as Kashubia
Kashubia
(Kashubian: Kaszëbë; Polish: Kaszuby; German: Kaschubei, Kaschubien). They speak the Kashubian language, which is classified either as a separate language closely related to Polish, or as a Polish dialect.[8][9] Analogously to their linguistic classification, the Kashubs are considered either an ethnic or a linguistic community.[9] The Kashubs are closely related to the Poles
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Baltic Sea
The Baltic Sea
Sea
is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Scandinavia, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, Poland, Germany
Germany
and the North and Central European Plain. The sea stretches from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 10°E to 30°E longitude. A mediterranean sea of the Atlantic, with limited water exchange between the two bodies, the Baltic Sea
Sea
drains through the Danish islands into the Kattegat
Kattegat
by way of the straits of Øresund, the Great Belt, and the Little Belt
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Gulf Of Gdańsk
Coordinates: 54°28′59″N 18°57′31″E / 54.48306°N 18.95861°E / 54.48306; 18.95861 Bay of Gdańsk Gdansk Bay or the Bay of Gdansk Polish: Zatoka Gdańska; Kashubian: Gduńskô Hôwinga; Russian: Гданьская бухта, Gdan'skaja bukhta, and German: Danziger Bucht) is a southeastern bay of the Baltic Sea. It is named after the adjacent port city of Gdańsk in Poland and is sometimes referred to as the Gulf of Gdańsk.Contents1 Geography 2 Nautic definition 3 History3.1 Kursenieki4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] Gdańsk Bay is known for its beaches. The western part of Gdańsk Bay is formed by the shallow waters of the Bay of Puck
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