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National Civic League
The National Civic League
National Civic League
is an American non-profit organization with a mission to advance civic engagement to create equitable, thriving communities. It was founded as the National Municipal League in 1894 at the National Conference for Good City
City
Government in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1] The convention of politicians, policy-makers, journalists, and educators (including Theodore Roosevelt, Louis Brandeis, Marshall Field, and Frederick Law Olmsted) met to discuss the future of American cities. It also promotes professional management of local government through publication of "model charters" for both city and county governments. The National Civic League
National Civic League
applies civic engagement principles through key programs: Community Assistance, Research and Publications, and Awards and Events
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George Latimer (Minnesota Politician)
George Latimer (born 1935) was the mayor of Saint Paul, Minnesota, the state's capital city, from 1976 until 1990. A member of the DFL and a labor lawyer by profession, the bearded Latimer was known for his redevelopment of St. Paul's downtown core, serving as mayor during a period when St. Paul's population was declining somewhat as some residents moved to suburban areas while the city's ethnic diversity increased as, among others, Hmong refugees from Vietnam
Vietnam
and Laos resettled in Saint Paul. Born in Schenectady, New York, Latimer attended Saint Michael's College and Columbia Law School
Columbia Law School
and practiced law in Saint Paul from 1963 until he was elected mayor
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OCLC
OCLC, Inc., d/b/a OCLC[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio
Ohio
College Library Center, then became the Online Computer Library Center as it expanded. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Non-profit Organization
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
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Bill Bradley
William Warren Bradley (born July 28, 1943) is an American politician and former professional basketball player. He served three terms as a Democratic U.S. Senator from New Jersey. He ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic Party's nomination for president in the 2000 election. Bradley was born and raised in Crystal City, Missouri, a small town 45 miles south of St. Louis. He excelled at basketball from an early age. He did well academically and was an all-county and all-state basketball player in high school. He was offered 75 college scholarships, but declined them all to attend Princeton University. He won a gold medal as a member of the 1964 Olympic basketball team and was the NCAA
NCAA
Player of the Year in 1965, when Princeton finished third in the NCAA
NCAA
Tournament
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League Of California Cities
President Gavin Newsom
Gavin Newsom
(D)President Pro Temp Kevin de León
Kevin de León
(D)Majority Leader
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Terry Sanford
James Terry Sanford
Terry Sanford
(August 20, 1917 – April 18, 1998) was an American university administrator and politician from North Carolina. A member of the Democratic Party, Sanford was the 65th Governor of North Carolina
North Carolina
(1961–1965), a two-time U.S. Presidential candidate in the 1970s and a U.S. Senator (1986–1993). Sanford was a strong proponent of public education and introduced a number of reforms and new programs in North Carolina's schools and institutions of higher education as the state's governor, increasing funding for education and establishing the North Carolina
North Carolina
Fund. From 1969 to 1985, Sanford was President of Duke University. An Eagle Scout as a youth, Sanford became an FBI
FBI
agent after graduating from the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Chapel Hill in 1939
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John W. Gardner
John William Gardner (October 8, 1912 – February 16, 2002) was Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) under President Lyndon Johnson.Contents1 Biography 2 Publications and speeches 3 The John Gardner Fellowship Program 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] A native of California, Gardner attended Stanford University. As an undergrad he set several swimming records and won a number of Pacific Coast championships, and graduated "with great distinction." After earning a Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley in 1938, Dr. Gardner taught at Connecticut College
Connecticut College
and at Mount Holyoke. During the early days of World War II he was chief of the Latin American Section, Foreign Broadcast Intelligence Service
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University Of California Press
University of California
University of California
Press, otherwise known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California
University of California
that engages in academic publishing. It was founded in 1893[2] to publish books and papers for the faculty of the University of California, established 25 years earlier in 1868. Its headquarters are located in Oakland, California. The University of California
University of California
Press currently publishes in the following general subject areas: anthropology, art, ancient world/classical studies, California
California
and the West, cinema & media studies, criminology, environmental studies, food and wine, history, music, politics, psychology, public health and medicine, religion, and sociology. It is a non-profit publishing arm of the University of California
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Henry M. Waite
Colonel Henry Matson Waite (May 15, 1869 - September 2, 1944) was an engineer and the City Manager
City Manager
of Dayton, Ohio
Dayton, Ohio
starting in 1913.[1] He was the deputy administrator for the Public Works Administration
Public Works Administration
from 1933 until September 1, 1935.[2][3] Biography[edit] He was born in Toledo, Ohio
Toledo, Ohio
on May 15, 1869 to Henry Seldon Waite. Waite was the grandson of Morrison Waite, the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.[4] He graduated from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1890 then worked in railroad engineering and in coal mining.[5][6] He then served as the city engineer for Cincinnati, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
from 1911 to 1913
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William Winter (politician)
William Forrest Winter (born February 21, 1923) is an American attorney and politician; he served as the 58th Governor of Mississippi from 1980 to 1984. A Democrat, he is known for his strong support of public education, freedom of information, racial reconciliation, and historic preservation. Winter is best remembered for the passage of the Mississippi
Mississippi
Education Reform Act. The law was the first serious attempt to improve state education in more than 20 years and established public kindergartens. The Winter administration also successfully rewrote the state public utilities law when the legislature passed the Public Utilities Reform Act.[1]:232 Winter served in the US Army during World War II
World War II
in the Philippines. He was elected to the state legislature in 1947 while still in law school
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Los Angeles, California
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.7
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Municipal Charter
A city charter or town charter (generically, municipal charter) is a legal document (charter) establishing a municipality such as a city or town. The concept developed in Europe
Europe
during the Middle Ages. Traditionally the granting of a charter gave a settlement and its inhabitants the right to town privileges under the feudal system. Townspeople who lived in chartered towns were burghers, as opposed to serfs who lived in villages. Towns were often "free", in the sense that they were directly protected by the king or emperor, and were not part of a feudal fief. Today the process for granting is determined by the type of government of the state in question. In monarchies, charters are still often a royal charter given by the Crown or the state authorities acting on behalf of the Crown
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City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-outpu
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