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National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan (国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
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Supreme Commander For The Allied Powers
The Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers
Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers
(SCAP) (originally briefly styled Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers[1]) was the title held by General Douglas MacArthur
Douglas MacArthur
during the Allied occupation of Japan following World War II. In Japan, the position was generally referred to as GHQ (General Headquarters), as SCAP also referred to the offices of the occupation, including a staff of several hundred U.S. civil servants as well as military personnel. Some of these personnel effectively wrote a first draft of the Japanese Constitution, which the National Diet
National Diet
then ratified after a few amendments
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Ministry Of Education, Culture, Sports, Science And Technology
Technology
Technology
("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia[2]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology
Technology
can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, and the like, or it can be embedded in machines to allow for operation without detailed knowledge of their workings. The simplest form of technology is the development and use of basic tools. The prehistoric discovery of how to control fire and the later Neolithic Revolution
Neolithic Revolution
increased the available sources of food, and the invention of the wheel helped humans to travel in and control their environment
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Ueno, Tokyo
Ueno
Ueno
(上野, upper wild field) is a district in Tokyo's Taitō Ward, best known as the home of Ueno
Ueno
Park. Ueno
Ueno
is also home to some of Tokyo's finest cultural sites, including the Tokyo
Tokyo
National Museum, the National Museum of Western Art, and the National Museum of Nature and Science, as well as a major public concert hall. Many Buddhist temples are in the area, including the Bentendo
Bentendo
temple dedicated to goddess Benzaiten, on an island in Shinobazu Pond. The Kan'ei-ji, a major temple of the Tokugawa shōguns, stood in this area, and its pagoda is now within the grounds of the Ueno
Ueno
Zoo. Nearby is the Ueno Tōshō-gū, a Shinto shrine dedicated to Tokugawa Ieyasu. Near the Tokyo
Tokyo
National Museum there is The International Library of Children's Literature
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Masakazu Nakai
Masakazu is a masculine Japanese given name
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Tokugawa Shogunate
The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) and the Edo
Edo
bakufu (江戸幕府), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868.[1] The head of government was the shōgun,[2] and each was a member of the Tokugawa clan.[3] The Tokugawa shogunate
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Taishō Period
The Taishō period
Taishō period
(大正時代, Taishō jidai), or Taishō era, is a period in the history of Japan
Japan
dating from July 30, 1912, to December 25, 1926, coinciding with the reign of the Emperor Taishō.[1] The new emperor was a sickly man, which prompted the shift in political power from the old oligarchic group of elder statesmen (or genrō) to the Imperial Diet of Japan
Japan
and the democratic parties
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Marxist
Marxism
Marxism
is a method of socioeconomic analysis that frames capitalism through a paradigm of exploitation, analyzes class relations and social conflict using a materialist interpretation of historical development and takes a dialectical view of social transformation. It originates from the works of 19th century German philosophers Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. Marxism
Marxism
uses a methodology known as historical materialism to analyze and critique the development of capitalism and the role of class struggles in systemic economic change
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International Library Of Children's Literature
International
International
mostly means something (a company, language, or organization) involving more than a single country. The term international as a word means involvement of, interaction between or encompassing more than one nation, or generally beyond national boundaries. For example, international law, which is applied by more than one country and usually everywhere on Earth, and international language which is a language spoken by residents of more than one country.Contents1 Origin of the word 2 Meaning in particular fields 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 SourcesOrigin of the word[edit] The term international was coined by the utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham
in his Introduction to Principles of Morals and Legislation, which was printed for publication in 1780 and published in 1789
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Research Library
A research library is a library which contains an in-depth collection of material on one or several subjects (Young, 1983; p.188). A research library will generally include primary sources as well as secondary sources. Large university libraries are considered research libraries, and often contain many specialized branch research libraries. Research libraries can be either reference libraries, which do not lend their holdings, or lending libraries, which do lend all or some of their holdings
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Shōgun
A shōgun (将軍, [ɕoːɡɯɴ] ( listen)) was the military dictator of Japan
Japan
during the period from 1185 to 1868 (with exceptions). In most of this period, the shōguns were the de facto rulers of the country, although nominally they were appointed by the Emperor as a ceremonial formality.[1] The shōguns held almost absolute power over territories through military means
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National Archives
National archives
National archives
are the archives of a country. The concept evolved in various nations at the dawn of modernity based on the impact of nationalism upon bureaucratic processes of paperwork retention.Contents1 Conceptual development1.1 France 1.2 Britain 1.3 Canada 1.4 Latin America 1.5 United States2 Citations 3 References 4 External linksConceptual development[edit]"Although the most basic and essential task of a national archives is to serve the interests of the government itself, and to preserve and make available evidence protecting the rights of citizens, it has other responsibilities of far-reaching importance
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House Of Peers (Japan)
The House of Peers (貴族院, Kizoku-in) was the upper house of the Imperial Diet as mandated under the Constitution of the Empire of Japan (in effect from 11 February 1889 to 3 May 1947).Contents1 Background 2 Establishment 3 Composition 4 Postwar dissolution 5 Presidents of the House of Peers 6 References 7 See alsoBackground[edit] In 1869, under the new Meiji government, a Japanese peerage was created by an Imperial decree merging the former Court nobility (kuge) and former feudal lords (daimyōs) into a single new aristocratic class called the kazoku. A second imperial ordinance in 1884 grouped the kazoku into five ranks equivalent to the European aristocrats, prince (or duke), marquis, count, viscount, and baron.[1] Although this grouping idea was taken from the European peerage, the Japanese titles were taken from Chinese and based on the ancient feudal system in China
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Iwakura Tomomi
Iwakura may refer to:Yorishiro#Iwakura, sacred rocks considered to be abodes of the gods in Shinto Iwakura, Aichi, a city in Aichi Prefecture of Japan Iwakura Mission, a diplomatic program during the Meiji restoration Iwakura Oda, alternate Japanese Oda clan of Owari ProvinceAs a surname Iwakura Tomom
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Qing Dynasty
Tael
Tael
(liǎng)Preceded by Succeeded byLater JinShunSouthern MingDzungarRepublic of ChinaMongoliaThe Qing dynasty, also known as the Qing Empire, officially the Great Qing (English: /tʃɪŋ/), was the last imperial dynasty of China, established in 1636 and ruling China from 1644 to 1912. It was preceded by the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
and succeeded by the Republic of China. The Qing multi-cultural empire lasted almost three centuries and formed the territorial base for the modern Chinese state. It was the fourth largest empire in world history. The dynasty was founded by the Jurchen Aisin Gioro
Aisin Gioro
clan in Manchuria. In the late sixteenth century, Nurhaci, originally a Ming vassal, began organizing "Banners", military-social units that included Jurchen, Han Chinese, and Mongol elements
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