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Nara-Narayana
Nara- Narayana
Narayana
(Sanskrit: नर-नारायण; nara-nārāyaṇa) is a Hindu deity pair. Nara- Narayana
Narayana
is the twin-brother avatar of the God Vishnu
Vishnu
on earth, working for the preservation of dharma or righteousness. In the concept of Nara-Narayana, the human soul Nara is the eternal companion of the Divine Narayana. The Hindu epic Mahabharata
Mahabharata
identifies the God Krishna
Krishna
(an avatar of Vishnu) with Narayana
Narayana
and Arjuna
Arjuna
- the chief hero of the epic - with Nara. The legend of Nara- Narayana
Narayana
is also told in the scripture Bhagavata Purana
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Brahma Purana
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu
Hindu
textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma
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Himalayas
The Himalayas, or Himalaya
Himalaya
(/ˌhɪməˈleɪə, hɪˈmɑːləjə/), form a mountain range in Asia
Asia
separating the plains of the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau. The Himalayan range has many of the Earth's highest peaks, including the highest, Mount Everest. The Himalayas
Himalayas
include over fifty mountains exceeding 7,200 metres (23,600 ft) in elevation, including all of the fourteen 8,000-metre peaks. By contrast, the highest peak outside Asia
Asia
(Aconcagua, in the Andes) is 6,961 metres (22,838 ft) tall.[1] Lifted by the subduction of the Indian tectonic plate under the Eurasian Plate, the Himalayan mountain range runs, west-northwest to east-southeast, in an arc 2,400 kilometres (1,500 mi) long.[2] Its western anchor, Nanga Parbat, lies just south of the northernmost bend of Indus
Indus
river
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Shiva
Shiva
Shiva
(/ˈʃiːvə/; Sanskrit: शिव, Śiva, lit. the auspicious one) also known as Mahadeva (lit. the great god)[7][8][9] is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. He is one of the supreme beings within Shaivism, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism.[10][11] Shiva
Shiva
is known as "The Destroyer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu trinity that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Vishnu.[1][12] In Shaivism
Shaivism
tradition, Shiva
Shiva
is one of the supreme beings who creates, protects and transforms the universe.[7][8][9] In the Shaktism
Shaktism
tradition, the Goddess, or Devi, is described as one of the supreme, yet Shiva
Shiva
is revered along with Vishnu
Vishnu
and Brahma
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Weapon
A weapon, arm, or armament is any device used with intent to inflict damage or harm to living creatures, structures, or systems. Weapons are used to increase the efficacy and efficiency of activities such as hunting, crime, law enforcement, self-defense, and warfare. In broader context, weapons may be construed to include anything used to gain a strategic, material or mental advantage over an adversary or enemy target. While ordinary objects such as sticks, stones, cars, or pencils can be used as weapons, many are expressly designed for the purpose – ranging from simple implements such as clubs, swords and guns, to complicated modern intercontinental ballistic missiles, biological and cyberweapons
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Rishis
Rishi
Rishi
(Sanskrit: ऋषि IAST: ṛṣi) is a Vedic term that denotes an inspired poet of hymns from the Vedas. Post-Vedic tradition of Hinduism
Hinduism
regards the rishis as "seers", "great sadhu" or "sages" who after intense meditation (tapas) realized the supreme truth and eternal knowledge, which they composed into hymns.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 "Seer" of the Vedas 3 Rishi
Rishi
in Indonesia and Khmer temples 4 Ruesi in Cambodia, Thailand and Laos 5 Other uses 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The word Rishi
Rishi
(Great Yogi, Phra Ruesi, Lao: ພະລືສີ, Thai: พระฤาษี) may be derived from two different meanings of the root 'rsh'. Sanskrit
Sanskrit
grammarians[2] derive this word from the second meaning: "to go, to move".[3] V. S
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Meditation
Meditation
Meditation
can be defined as a practice where an individual focuses their mind on a particular object, thought or activity to achieve a mentally clear and emotionally calm state.[1] Meditation
Meditation
may be used to reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and pain.[2] It may be done while sitting, repeating a mantra, and closing the eyes in a quiet environment. Meditation
Meditation
has been practiced since antiquity in numerous religious traditions and beliefs. Since the 19th century, it has spread from its Indian origins to other cultures where it is commonly practiced in private and business life
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Jnana
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa PrabhākaraAdvaita VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ramana Maharshi Siddharudha Chinmayananda NisargadattaVishishtadvaitaNammalvar Alvars Yamunacharya Ramanuja Vedanta
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Nirvikalpa
Nirvikalpa (Sanskrit : निर्विकल्प) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
adjective with the general sense of "not admitting an alternative",[1] formed by applying the contra-existential prepositional prefix निः ni ("away, without, not") to the term विकल्प vikalpa ("alternative, variant thought or conception").[2]Contents1 Usage1.1 Raja Yoga 1.2 Shaivism 1.3 Buddhism2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 Sources5.1 Pri
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Samadhi
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Urvashi
Urvashi
Urvashi
(Sanskrit: उर्वशी, lit. she who can control heart of others. ("Ur" means heart and "vash" means to control) is an Apsara (nymph) in Hindu legend. Monier Monier-Williams
Monier Monier-Williams
proposes a different etymology in which the name means 'widely pervasive' and suggests that in its first appearances in Vedic texts it is a name for the dawn goddess. She was a celestial maiden in Indra's court and was considered the most beautiful of all the Apsaras. She is the mother of Rishyasringa, the great saint of the Ramayana
Ramayana
era of ancient India from Vibhandaka, who later played crucial role in birth of Rama
Rama
and was married to Shanta, the elder sister of Rama. She became the wife of king Pururavas
Pururavas
(Purūrávas, from purū+rávas "crying much or loudly"), an ancient chief of the lunar race
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Indra
Indra
Indra
(/ˈɪndrə/, Sanskrit: इन्द्र) is a Vedic deity in Hinduism,[1] a guardian deity in Buddhism,[2] and the king of the highest heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism.[3] His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical to those of the Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).[1][4][5] In the Vedas, Indra
Indra
is the king of Svarga
Svarga
(Heaven) and the Devas. He is the god of the heavens, lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.[6] Indra
Indra
is the most referred to deity in the Rigveda.[7] He is celebrated for his powers, and the one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra
Vritra
who obstructs human prosperity and happiness
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Bhagavad Gita
The Bhagavad Gita
Bhagavad Gita
(/ˈbʌɡəvəd ˈɡiːtɑː/; Sanskrit: भगवद्गीता, bhagavad-gītā in IAST, Sanskrit pronunciation: [ˈbʱaɡəʋəd̪ ɡiːˈt̪aː], lit. "Song of the Lord"[1]), often referred to as the Gita, is a 700[2][3] verse Hindu
Hindu
scripture in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
that is part of the Hindu epic
Hindu epic
Mahabharata (chapters 23–40 of the 6th book of Mahabharata). The Gita is set in a narrative framework of a dialogue between Pandava prince Arjuna
Arjuna
and his guide and charioteer Lord Krishna
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Deva (Hinduism)
Deva (/ˈdeɪvə/; Sanskrit: देव, Devá) means "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and is also one of the terms for a deity in Hinduism.[1] Deva is a masculine term; the feminine equivalent is devi. In the earliest Vedic literature, all supernatural beings are called Asuras.[2][3] The concepts and legends evolve in ancient Indian literature, and by the late Vedic period, benevolent supernatural beings are referred to as Deva-Asuras
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Kamadeva
Kāmadeva ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
in Devanagari: कामदेव), Kāma or Manmatha is the Hindu
Hindu
god of human love[2] or desire, often portrayed along with his female counterpart Rati. Some narratives also reference Pradyumna, Krishna's son, as a reincarnation of Kamadeva.[2]Contents1 Etymology and other names 2 Iconography 3 Textual sources 4 Mythology4.1 Birth 4.2 Incineration by Shiva 4.3 Reincarnation as Krishna's son5 Beliefs and worship5.1 Rituals and festivals 5.2 In Gaudiya Vaishnavism6 Temples 7 See also 8 Footnotes 9 ReferencesEtymology and other names[edit] The name Kama-deva ( IAST
IAST
kāma-deva) can be translated as 'god of love'. Deva means heavenly or divine. Kama
Kama
( IAST
IAST
kāma) means "desire" or "longing", especially as in sensual or sexual love. The name is used in Rig Veda
Rig Veda
(RV 9, 113
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Vasanta (Ritu)
Vasanta or Vasantha may refer to: Vasanta (Ritu), spring season in Hindu calendar Vasantha (raga), a musical scale (raga) in Carnatic music Vasanta, a scouting group in the Netherlands, founded in 1933 Vasanta was also the original name of the USS Aquamarine (PYc-7) Vasanta Group, a UK-based office supplies company


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