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Naomi (novel)
NAOMI (痴人の愛, Chijin no Ai, lit. A Fool's Love) is a novel by Japanese author Jun\'ichirō Tanizaki (1886–1965). Writing of the novel began in 1924, and from March to June, Osaka's Morning News (大阪朝日新聞, Osaka
Osaka
Asahi Shinbun) published the first several chapters of the serial . Four months later, the periodical Female (女性, Josei) started to publish the remaining chapters. Various Japanese and United States publishers have compiled the chapters and published them as a book since 1947. Narrated in the first person by the protagonist, a salaryman named Jōji, the novel follows his attempt to groom a Eurasian -looking girl, the titular Naomi, to be a Westernized woman. Naomi is a significant work in its comic depiction of Japanese culture of the era and its fascination with the West
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Syllabary
A SYLLABARY is a set of written symbols that represent the syllables or (more frequently) moras which make up words . A symbol in a syllabary, called a syllabogram , typically represents an (optional) consonant sound (simple onset ) followed by a vowel sound (nucleus )—that is, a CV or V syllable—but other phonographic mappings such as CVC, CV- tone, and C (normally nasals at the end of syllables) are also found in syllabaries
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Katakana
KATAKANA (片仮名, カタカナ) is a Japanese
Japanese
syllabary , one component of the Japanese writing system
Japanese writing system
along with hiragana , kanji , and in some cases the Latin script (known as romaji ). The word katakana means "fragmentary kana", as the katakana characters are derived from components of more complex kanji. Katakana
Katakana
and hiragana are both kana systems. With one or two minor exceptions, each syllable (strictly mora ) in the Japanese language
Japanese language
is represented by one character, or kana, in each system. Each kana is either a vowel such as "a" (katakana ア); a consonant followed by a vowel such as "ka" (katakana カ); or "n" (katakana ン), a nasal sonorant which, depending on the context, sounds either like English m, n, or ng (), or like the nasal vowels of Portuguese
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Irony
IRONY (from Ancient Greek εἰρωνεία eirōneía, meaning 'dissimulation, feigned ignorance' ), in its broadest sense, is a rhetorical device , literary technique , or event in which what appears, on the surface, to be the case, differs radically from what is actually the case. Irony
Irony
may be divided into categories such as VERBAL , DRAMATIC , and SITUATIONAL . Verbal, dramatic, and situational irony are often used for emphasis in the assertion of a truth. The ironic form of simile , used in sarcasm , and some forms of litotes can emphasize one's meaning by the deliberate use of language which states the opposite of the truth, denies the contrary of the truth, or drastically and obviously understates a factual connection. Other forms, as identified by historian Connop Thirlwall , include dialectic and practical irony
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Succubus
A SUCCUBUS is a Lilin -demon in female form, or supernatural entity in folklore (traced back to medieval legend) that appears in dreams and takes the form of a woman in order to seduce men, usually through sexual activity . The male counterpart is the incubus . Religious traditions hold that repeated sexual activity with a succubus may result in the deterioration of health, mental state, or even death. In modern representations, a succubus may or may not appear in dreams and is often depicted as a highly attractive seductress or enchantress ; whereas, in the past, succubi were generally depicted as frightening and demonic
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Flapper
FLAPPERS were a generation of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz , and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking , treating sex in a casual manner , smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms. Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties
Roaring Twenties
, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I
World War I
, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe
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Chinese Character
CHINESE CHARACTERS are logograms used in the writing of Chinese , Japanese , Korean , and some other Asian languages. In Standard Chinese , they are called HàNZì (simplified Chinese : 汉字; traditional Chinese : 漢字, lit "Han characters"). They have been adapted to write a number of other languages, including Japanese , where they are known as Kanji
Kanji
(漢字); Korean , where they are known as Hanja
Hanja
(漢字); Vietnamese , in a system known as chữ Nôm ; and Zhuang , in a system known as " Sawndip ". Collectively, they are known as CJK CHARACTERS . Chinese characters constitute the oldest continuously used system of writing in the world. By virtue of their widespread current use in East Asia , and historic use throughout the Sinosphere , Chinese characters are among the most widely adopted writing systems in the world by number of users
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Women's Suffrage
WOMEN\'S SUFFRAGE (also known as FEMALE SUFFRAGE, WOMAN SUFFRAGE or WOMEN\'S RIGHT TO VOTE) is the right of women to vote in elections . Limited voting rights were gained by women in Finland , Iceland , Sweden and some Australian colonies and western U.S. states in the late 19th century. National and international organizations formed to coordinate efforts to gain voting rights, especially the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (founded in 1904, Berlin, Germany), and also worked for equal civil rights for women. In 1881, the Isle of Man gave women who owned property the right to vote. In 1893, the British colony of New Zealand , granted women the right to vote. The colony of South Australia , did the same in 1894 and women were able to vote in the next election, which was held in 1895
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Meiji Restoration
The MEIJI RESTORATION (明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to Japan in 1868 under Emperor Meiji . Although there were Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan
Emperor of Japan
. The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new emperor in the Charter Oath . The Restoration led to enormous changes in Japan's political and social structure, and spanned both the late Edo period
Edo period
(often called the Late Tokugawa shogun ) and the beginning of the Meiji period
Meiji period

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Textile Industry
The TEXTILE INDUSTRY is primally concerned with the design and production of yarn , cloth , clothing , and their distribution. The raw material may be natural, or synthetic using products of the chemical industry
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Western Culture
WESTERN CULTURE, sometimes equated with WESTERN CIVILIZATION, OCCIDENTAL CULTURE, the WESTERN WORLD, WESTERN SOCIETY, EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION, or JUDEO-GRECO-CHRISTIAN CIVILIZATION, is a term used very broadly to refer to a heritage of social norms , ethical values , traditional customs , belief systems , political systems and specific artifacts and technologies that have some origin or association with Europe
Europe
. The term also applies beyond Europe, to countries and cultures whose histories are strongly connected to Europe
Europe
by immigration, colonization, or influence. For example, Western Culture includes countries in the Americas
Americas
and Australasia , whose language and demographic ethnicity majorities are currently European
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Waiting Staff
WAITING STAFF are those who work at a restaurant or a bar , and sometimes in private homes, attending customers—supplying them with food and drink as requested. A server or waiting staff takes on a very important role in a restaurant which is to always be attentive and accommodating to the customers. Each waiter follows rules and guidelines that are developed by the manager. Wait staff can abide by these rules by completing many different tasks throughout their shifts, such as food-running, polishing dishes and silverware, helping bus tables, and restocking working stations with needed supplies. Waiting on tables is (along with nursing and teaching ) part of the service sector , and among the most common occupations in the United States . The Bureau of Labor Statistics
Bureau of Labor Statistics
estimates that, as of May 2008, there were over 2.2 million persons employed as servers in the U.S
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White-collar Worker
In many countries (such as Australia
Australia
, Canada
Canada
, New Zealand
New Zealand
, United Kingdom , Denmark
Denmark
or the United States
United States
), a WHITE-COLLAR WORKER is a person who performs professional, managerial, or administrative work. White-collar work is performed in an office, cubicle, or other administrative setting. Other types of work are those of a blue-collar worker , whose job requires manual labor and a pink-collar worker , whose labor is related to customer interaction, entertainment, sales, or other service-oriented work. Many occupations blend blue, white and pink (service) industry categorizations
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Kadokawa Shoten
KADOKAWA SHOTEN (角川書店), formerly KADOKAWA SHOTEN CO., LTD. (株式会社角川書店, Kabushiki gaisha Kadokawa Shoten), is a Japanese publisher and brand company of Kadokawa Corporation based in Tokyo , Japan. It became an internal division of Kadokawa Corporation on October 1, 2013. Kadokawa has published both manga novels and magazines, such as Newtype magazine. Since its founding, Kadokawa has expanded into the multimedia sector, namely in video games (as Kadokawa Games) and movies (as Kadokawa Pictures ). CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Subsidiaries * 3 Magazines published * 4 Manga titles published * 5 Video games published and developed * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links HISTORY Kadokawa Shoten headquarters. Kadokawa Shoten was established on November 10, 1945 by Genyoshi Kadokawa
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor ; short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals , it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals. It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals. As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR; most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone. JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Content * 3 Access * 3.1 Aaron Swartz incident * 3.2 Limitations * 3.3 Increasing public access * 4 Use * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links HISTORY William G. Bowen , president of Princeton University from 1972 to 1988, founded JSTOR
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a DIGITAL OBJECT IDENTIFIER or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
( ISO
ISO
). An implementation of the Handle System , DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL , indicating where the object can be found
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