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Naomi (novel)
Naomi (痴人の愛, Chijin no Ai, lit. A Fool's Love) is a novel by Japanese author Jun'ichirō Tanizaki
Jun'ichirō Tanizaki
(1886–1965). Writing of the novel began in 1924, and from March to June, Osaka's Morning News (大阪朝日新聞, Osaka
Osaka
Asahi Shinbun) published the first several chapters of the serial. Four months later, the periodical Female (女性, Josei) started to publish the remaining chapters. Various Japanese and United States publishers have compiled the chapters and published them as a book since 1947. Narrated in the first person by the protagonist, a salaryman named Jōji, the novel follows his attempt to groom a Eurasian-looking girl, the titular Naomi, to be a Westernized woman. Naomi is a significant work in its comic depiction of Japanese culture of the era and its fascination with the West
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University Of Washington
The University of Washington
University of Washington
(commonly referred to as UW, simply Washington, or informally U-Dub)[5] is a public flagship research university located in Seattle, Washington. Founded in 1861, Washington is one of the oldest, largest, and most recognized universities in the United States. It was first established in downtown Seattle
Seattle
a decade after the city's founding, to aid the economic development of Seattle. Today, the University's 703-acre main Seattle
Seattle
campus is situated in the University District above the Montlake Cut, within the urban Puget Sound region
Puget Sound region
of the Pacific Northwest, and it has since then expanded with two additional campuses in Tacoma and Bothell
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White-collar Worker
In many countries (such as Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United States), a white-collar worker is a person who performs professional, managerial, or administrative work. White-collar work may be performed in an office or other administrative setting. Other types of work are those of a blue-collar worker, whose job requires manual labor and a pink-collar worker, whose labor is related to customer interaction, entertainment, sales, or other service-oriented work
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Textile Industry
The textile industry is primarily concerned with the design, production and distribution of yarn, cloth and clothing
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Western Culture
Western culture, sometimes equated with Western civilization, Occidental culture, the Western world, Western society, European civilization, or Christian
Christian
civilization,[2] is a term used very broadly to refer to a heritage of social norms, ethical values, traditional customs, belief systems, political systems and specific artifacts and technologies that have some origin or association with Europe. The term also applies beyond Europe
Europe
to countries and cultures whose histories are strongly connected to Europe
Europe
by immigration, colonization, or influence
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Waiting Staff
Waiting staff
Waiting staff
are those who work at a restaurant or a bar, and sometimes in private homes, attending customers—supplying them with food and drink as requested. A server or waiting staff takes on a very important role in a restaurant which is to always be attentive and accommodating to the customers. Each waiter follows rules and guidelines that are developed by the manager. Wait staff can abide by these rules by completing many different tasks throughout their shifts, such as food-running, polishing dishes and silverware, helping bus tables, and restocking working stations with needed supplies. Waiting on tables is (along with nursing and teaching) part of the service sector, and among the most common occupations in the United States
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Women's Suffrage
Women's suffrage
Women's suffrage
(colloquial: female suffrage, woman suffrage or women's right to vote) is the right of women to vote in elections; a person who advocates the extension of suffrage, particularly to women, is called a suffragist.[1] Limited voting rights were gained by women in Finland, Iceland, Sweden
Sweden
and some Australian colonies and western U.S. states in the late 19th century.[2] National and international organizations formed to coordinate efforts to gain voting rights, especially the International Woman
Woman
Suffrage
Suffrage
Alliance (founded in 1904, Berlin, Germany), and also worked for equal civil rights for women.[3] In 1881, the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
gave women who owned property the right to vote
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Chinese Character
Chinese characters
Chinese characters
are logograms primarily used in the writing of Chinese and Japanese. Occasionally, they are also used for writing Korean, Vietnamese and some other Asian languages. In Standard Chinese, they are called Hanzi (simplified Chinese: 汉字; traditional Chinese: 漢字, lit "Han characters").[2][3][4] They have been adapted to write a number of other Asian languages, including Korean, where they are known as Hanja
Hanja
(漢字), Japanese, where they are known as Kanji
Kanji
(漢字), Vietnamese, in a system known as Chữ Nôm, and Zhuang, in a system known as Sawndip. Collectively, they are known as CJK characters
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Katakana
Katakana
Katakana
(片仮名, かたかな, カタカナ, Japanese pronunciation: [katakana]) is a Japanese
Japanese
syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system
Japanese writing system
along with hiragana,[2] kanji, and in some cases the Latin script
Latin script
(known as romaji). The word katakana means "fragmentary kana", as the katakana characters are derived from components or fragments of more complex kanji. Katakana
Katakana
and hiragana are both kana systems. With one or two minor exceptions, each syllable (strictly mora) in the Japanese language
Japanese language
is represented by one character, or kana, in each system
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Syllabary
A syllabary is a set of written symbols that represent the syllables or (more frequently) moras which make up words
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Irony
Irony
Irony
(from Ancient Greek εἰρωνεία eirōneía, meaning 'dissimulation, feigned ignorance'[1]), in its broadest sense, is a rhetorical device, literary technique, or event in which what appears, on the surface, to be the case, differs radically from what is actually the case. Irony
Irony
can be categorized into different types, including: verbal irony, dramatic irony, and situational irony. Verbal, dramatic, and situational irony are often used for emphasis in the assertion of a truth
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Succubus
A succubus is a Lilin-demon in female form, or supernatural entity in folklore (traced back to medieval legend), that appears in dreams and takes the form of a woman in order to seduce men, usually through sexual activity. The male counterpart is the incubus
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Flapper
Flappers were a generation of young Western women in the 1920s
1920s
who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.[1] Flappers are icons of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.Contents1 Etymology 2 Influences 3 Evolution of the image
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Yasuzo Masumura
Yasuzo Masumura
Yasuzo Masumura
(増村 保造, Masumura Yasuzō, August 25, 1924 – November 23, 1986) was a Japanese film director.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Filmography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Masumura was born in Kōfu, Yamanashi. After dropping out of a law course at the University of Tokyo
University of Tokyo
he worked as an assistant director at the Daiei Film
Daiei Film
studio, later returning to university to study philosophy; he graduated in 1949. He then won a scholarship allowing him to study film in Italy at the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia under Michelangelo Antonioni, Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini
and Luchino Visconti.[1] Masumura returned to Japan
Japan
in 1953
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Meiji Period
The Meiji period
Meiji period
(明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912.[1] This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan
Japan
during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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Kadokawa Shoten
Kadokawa Shoten
Kadokawa Shoten
(角川書店), formerly Kadokawa Shoten
Kadokawa Shoten
Co., Ltd. (株式会社角川書店, Kabushiki gaisha
Kabushiki gaisha
Kadokawa Shoten), is a Japanese publisher and brand company of Kadokawa Corporation
Kadokawa Corporation
based in Tokyo, Japan. It became an internal division of Kadokawa Corporation on October 1, 2013. Kadokawa has published both manga novels and magazines, such as Newtype
Newtype
magazine
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