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Nantou County
Nantou County
Nantou County
(Chinese: 南投縣; pinyin: Nántóu Xiàn; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Lâm-tâu-kōan) is the second largest county of Taiwan.[1] It is also the only landlocked county in Taiwan. Its name derives from the Hoanya Taiwanese aboriginal word Ramtau. Nantou County is officially administered as a county of Taiwan. Its mountainous area makes it a tourist destination; Sun Moon Lake
Sun Moon Lake
is located in this county. Other well-known areas of the county are Hehuanshan
Hehuanshan
and Sitou. Notable cities in Nantou are Nantou City and Puli Town. Nantou County
Nantou County
butterfly is Broad-tailed swallowtail butterfly (Agehana maraho)
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Dadu River (Taiwan)
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Prunus Mume
The Prunus
Prunus
mume is an Asian tree species classified in the Armeniaca section of the genus Prunus
Prunus
subgenus Prunus. Its common names include Chinese plum[2][3][4] and Japanese apricot.[2] The flower is usually called plum blossom.[5] This distinct tree species is related to both the plum and apricot trees.[6] Although generally referred to as a plum in English, it is more closely related to the apricot.[7] In Chinese, Japanese and Korean cooking, the fruit of the tree is used in juices, as a flavouring for alcohol, as a pickle and in sauces
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Atayal People
The Atayal (Chinese: 泰雅; pinyin: Tàiyǎ), also known as the Tayal and the Tayan,[1] are an indigenous group of Taiwanese aborigines. In 2014, the Atayal people
Atayal people
numbered 85,888. This was approximately 15.9% of Taiwan's total indigenous population, making them the third-largest indigenous group.[2][3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Origins2.1 Genetics 2.2 Folklore3 Culture3.1 Lifestyle 3.2 Traditional dress 3.3 Facial tattoos4 Atayal in modern times 5 Notable Atayal people 6 See also 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The meaning of Atayal is "genuine person" or "brave man".[citation needed] Origins[edit]1901 map of Taiwan, with "Atayal Group of Savages" marked.Atayal sculpture in Wulai.The first record of Atayal inhabitance is found near the upper reaches of the Zhuoshui River. However, during the late 17th century they crossed the Central Mountain Ranges into the wilderness of the east. They then settled in the Liwu River valley
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Sitou
Sitou (Chinese: 寺头镇) is a town in Linqu County, Weifang, in Shandong province, China.[1] References[edit]^ 2012年统计用区划代码和城乡划分代码:临朐县 (in Chinese). National Bureau of Statistics of the People's Republic of China
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Koxinga
Zheng Chenggong, better known in the West by his Hokkien
Hokkien
honorific Koxinga
Koxinga
or Coxinga (Chinese: 國姓爺; pinyin: Guóxìngyé; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Kok-sèng-iâ), was a Chinese Ming loyalist who resisted the
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Landlocked
A landlocked state or landlocked country is a sovereign state entirely enclosed by land, or whose only coastlines lie on closed seas. There are currently 49 such countries, including five partially recognised states. Only two, Bolivia
Bolivia
and Paraguay
Paraguay
in South America, lie outside Afro-Eurasia
Afro-Eurasia
(the Old World). As a rule, being landlocked creates political and economic handicaps that access to the high seas avoids. For this reason, states large and small across history have striven to gain access to open waters, even at great expense in wealth, bloodshed, and political capital. The economic disadvantages of being landlocked can be alleviated or aggravated depending on degree of development, language barriers, and other considerations
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Pe̍h-ōe-jī
Southern MinAmoy TaiwaneseCreator Walter Henry Medhurst Elihu Doty John Van Nest TalmageTime periodsince the 1830sParent systemsEgyptian hieroglyphsProto-SinaiticPhoenician alphabetGreek alphabetLatin alphabetPe̍h-ōe-jīChild systemsTLPA Taiwanese Romanization SystemThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA. Pe̍h-ōe-jī
Pe̍h-ōe-jī
(pronounced [peʔ˩ ue˩ dzi˨] ( listen), abbreviated POJ, literally vernacular writing, also known as Church Romanization) is an orthography used to write variants of Southern Min
Southern Min
Chinese, particularly Taiwanese Southern Min
Southern Min
and Amoy Hokkien
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
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Cinnamomum Camphora
Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
camphora (commonly known as camphor tree, camphorwood or camphor laurel) is a large evergreen tree that grows up to 20–30 m (66–98 ft) tall.[1] The leaves have a glossy, waxy appearance and smell of camphor when crushed. In spring, it produces bright green foliage with masses of small white flowers. It produces clusters of black, berry-like fruit around 1 cm (0.39 in) in diameter
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UTC+8
UTC+08:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +08:00. In ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-08T19:44:16+08:00. With an estimated population of 1.708 billion living within the time zone[citation needed], roughly 24% of the world population, it is the most populous time zone in world, as well as a possible candidate for ASEAN Common Time. This time zone is used in all Chinese-speaking countries, giving international Chinese websites the same time. The southern-half of Vietnam (Republic of Vietnam) was formerly part of this time zone prior to the communist takeover of the South on April 30, 1975, making it 1 hour ahead of North Vietnam
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National Standard Time
National Standard Time (Chinese: 國家標準時間; pinyin: Guójiā Biāozhǔn Shíjiān; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Kok-ka Piau-chún Sî-kan, see below) is the official time zone in Taiwan
Taiwan
defined by an UTC offset of +08:00. This standard is also known as Taiwan
Taiwan
Time (臺灣時間), Taipei Time (臺北時間) and historically as Chungyuan Standard Time (中原標準時間) until the early 2000s.[1]Contents1 History 2 Present development 3 IANA time zone database 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]History of time standard in TaiwanDate Name Character Romanization Time offsetJan. 1, 1896 – Sep. 30, 1937 Western Standard Time 西部標準時 Seibu Hyōjunji UTC+08:00Oct. 1, 1937 – Sep. 20, 1945 Central Standard Time 中央標準時 Chūō Hyōjunji UTC+09:00Sep. 21, 1945 – Oct. 25, 1945 Western Standard Time 西部標準時 Seibu Hyōjunji UTC+08:00Oct
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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