HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nanomaterials
Nanomaterials
Nanomaterials
describe, in principle, materials of which a single unit is sized (in at least one dimension) between 1 to 1000 nanometres (10−9 meter) but usually is 1 to 100 nm (the usual definition of nanoscale[1]). Nanomaterials
Nanomaterials
research takes a materials science-based approach to nanotechnology, leveraging advances in materials metrology and synthesis which have been developed in support of microfabrication research
[...More...]

"Nanomaterials" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lower Fullerenes
Lower fullerenes
Lower fullerenes
are fullerene molecules consisting of fewer than 60 carbon atoms. They are cage-like fused-ring structures made of hexagons and pentagons, with a carbon atom at the vertices of each polygon and a bond along each polygon edge.Contents1 Properties 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksProperties[edit] Any fullerene with hexagons, pentagons and no other polygons must exactly have 12 pentagons
[...More...]

"Lower Fullerenes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Self-assembled Monolayer
Self-assembled monolayers
Self-assembled monolayers
(SAM) of organic molecules are molecular assemblies formed spontaneously on surfaces by adsorption and are organized into more or less large ordered domains.[1][2] In some cases molecules that form the monolayer do not interact strongly with the substrate. This is the case for instance of the two-dimensional supramolecular networks[3] of e.g. perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on gold[4] or of e.g. porphyrins on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG).[5] In other cases the molecules possess a head group that has a strong affinity to the substrate and anchors the molecule to it.[1] Such a SAM consisting of a head group, tail and functional end group is depicted in Figure 1. Common head groups include thiols, silanes, phosphonates, etc.Figure 1
[...More...]

"Self-assembled Monolayer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Molecular Scale Electronics
Molecular scale electronics, also called single-molecule electronics, is a branch of nanotechnology that uses single molecules, or nanoscale collections of single molecules, as electronic components. Because single molecules constitute the smallest stable structures imaginable, this miniaturization is the ultimate goal for shrinking electrical circuits. The field is often termed simply as "molecular electronics", but this term is also used to refer to the distantly related field of conductive polymers and organic electronics, which uses the properties of molecules to affect the bulk properties of a material
[...More...]

"Molecular Scale Electronics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nanolithography
Nanolithography is the branch of nanotechnology concerned with the study and application of fabricating nanometer-scale structures, meaning patterns with at least one lateral dimension between 1 and 1,000 nm. Different approaches can be categorized in serial or parallel, mask or maskless/direct-write, top-down or bottom-up, beam or tip-based, resist-based or resist-less methods. As of 2015, nanolithography is a very active area of research in academia and in industry
[...More...]

"Nanolithography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atomic Force Microscopy
Atomic force microscopy
Atomic force microscopy
(AFM) or scanning force microscopy (SFM) is a very-high-resolution type of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), with demonstrated resolution on the order of fractions of a nanometer, more than 1000 times better than the optical diffraction limit.Contents1 Overview1.1 Abilities 1.2 Other microscopy technologies 1.3 Configuration1.3.1 Detector 1.3.2 Image formation1.4 History 1.5 Applications2 Principles2.1 Imaging modes2.1.1 Contact mode 2.1.2 Tapping mode 2.1.3 Non-contact mode
[...More...]

"Atomic Force Microscopy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Higher Fullerene
Higher fullerenes are fullerene molecules consisting of more than 70 carbon atoms. They adopt cage-like structures made up of the fusion of hexagons and pentagons, with a carbon atom at the vertices of each polygon and a bond along each polygon edge. They are all black solids that dissolve sparingly in organic solvents to give deeply colored solutions.Contents1 Synthesis 2 Inventory 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksSynthesis[edit] Fullerenes are extracted from the specially prepared soot using organic solvents followed by chromatography.[1] Milligram amounts of higher fullerenes can be obtained with this method in the laboratory. According to the discovery of W. Krätchmer and D. R
[...More...]

"Higher Fullerene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synthesis Of Carbon Nanotubes
Techniques have been developed to produce carbon nanotubes in sizable quantities, including arc discharge, laser ablation, high-pressure carbon monoxide disproportionation, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Most of these processes take place in a vacuum or with process gases. CVD growth of CNTs can occur in vacuum or at atmospheric pressure
[...More...]

"Synthesis Of Carbon Nanotubes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

C70 Fullerene
C70 fullerene
C70 fullerene
is the fullerene molecule consisting of 70 carbon atoms. It is a cage-like fused-ring structure which resembles a rugby ball, made of 25 hexagons and 12 pentagons, with a carbon atom at the vertices of each polygon and a bond along each polygon edge. A related fullerene molecule, named buckminsterfullerene (C60 fullerene), consists of 60 carbon atoms. It was first intentionally prepared in 1985 by Harold Kroto, James R. Heath, Sean O'Brien, Robert Curl
Robert Curl
and Richard Smalley
Richard Smalley
at Rice University
[...More...]

"C70 Fullerene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scanning Tunneling Microscope
A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is an instrument for imaging surfaces at the atomic level. Its development in 1981 earned its inventors, Gerd Binnig
Gerd Binnig
and Heinrich Rohrer (at IBM
IBM
Zürich), the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1986.[1][2] For a STM, good resolution is considered to be 0.1 nm lateral resolution and 0.01 nm (10 pm) depth resolution.[3] With this resolution, individual atoms within materials are routinely imaged and manipulated. The STM can be used not only in ultra-high vacuum but also in air, water, and various other liquid or gas ambients, and at temperatures ranging from near zero kelvin to over 1000 °C.[4][5] STM is based on the concept of quantum tunneling. When a conducting tip is brought very near to the surface to be examined, a bias (voltage difference) applied between the two can allow electrons to tunnel through the vacuum between them
[...More...]

"Scanning Tunneling Microscope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electron Microscope
An electron microscope is a microscope that uses a beam of accelerated electrons as a source of illumination. As the wavelength of an electron can be up to 100,000 times shorter than that of visible light photons, electron microscopes have a higher resolving power than light microscopes and can reveal the structure of smaller objects
[...More...]

"Electron Microscope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Super Resolution Microscopy
Super-resolution microscopy
Super-resolution microscopy
is a form of light microscopy. Due to the diffraction of light, the resolution of conventional light microscopy is limited, as stated by Ernst Abbe
Ernst Abbe
in 1873.[1] A good approximation of the resolution attainable is the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function, and a diffraction-limited microscope with numerical aperture N.A. and light with wavelength λ reaches a resolution of λ/(2 N.A.). So for example, an oil immersion objective with N.A
[...More...]

"Super Resolution Microscopy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Optical Properties Of Carbon Nanotubes
Within materials science, the optical properties of carbon nanotubes refer specifically to the absorption, photoluminescence (fluorescence), and Raman spectroscopy
Raman spectroscopy
of carbon nanotubes. Spectroscopic methods offer the possibility of quick and non-destructive characterization of relatively large amounts of carbon nanotubes. There is a strong demand for such characterization from the industrial point of view: numerous parameters of the nanotube synthesis can be changed, intentionally or unintentionally, to alter the nanotube quality. As shown below, optical absorption, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies allow quick and reliable characterization of this "nanotube quality" in terms of non-tubular carbon content, structure (chirality) of the produced nanotubes, and structural defects
[...More...]

"Optical Properties Of Carbon Nanotubes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mechanical Properties Of Carbon Nanotubes
The mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes reveal them as one of the strongest materials in nature. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are long hollow cylinders of graphene. Although graphene sheets have 2D symmetry, carbon nanotubes by geometry have different properties in axial and radial directions. It has been shown that CNTs are very strong in the axial direction.[1] Young's modulus
Young's modulus
on the order of 270 - 950 GPa and tensile strength of 11 - 63 GPa were obtained.[1]Contents1 Strength1.1 Radial elasticity2 Hardness 3 Wettability 4 Kinetic properties 5 Defects 6 ReferencesStrength[edit] Carbon nanotubes are the strongest and stiffest materials yet discovered in terms of tensile strength and elastic modulus respectively. This strength results from the covalent sp2 bonds formed between the individual carbon atoms. In 2000, a multi-walled carbon nanotube was tested to have a tensile strength of 63 gigapascals (9,100,000 psi)
[...More...]

"Mechanical Properties Of Carbon Nanotubes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carbon Nanotube Chemistry
Carbon nanotube
Carbon nanotube
chemistry involves chemical reactions, which are used to modify the properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). CNTs can be functionalized to attain desired properties that can be used in a wide variety of applications. The two main methods of CNT functionalization are covalent and non-covalent modifications.[1] Because of their hydrophobic nature, CNTs tend to agglomerate hindering their dispersion in solvents or viscous polymer melts. The resulting nanotube bundles or aggregates reduce the mechanical performance of the final composite
[...More...]

"Carbon Nanotube Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Supramolecular Assembly
A supramolecular assembly or "supermolecule" is a well defined complex of molecules held together by noncovalent bonds. While a supramolecular assembly can be simply composed of two molecules (e.g., a DNA
DNA
double helix or an inclusion compound), it is more often used to denote larger complexes of molecules that form sphere-, rod-, or sheet-like species. Micelles, liposomes and biological membranes are examples of supramolecular assemblies.[3] The dimensions of supramolecular assemblies can range from nanometers to micrometers. Thus they allow access to nanoscale objects using a bottom-up approach in far fewer steps than a single molecule of similar dimensions. The process by which a supramolecular assembly forms is called molecular self-assembly. Some try to distinguish self-assembly as the process by which individual molecules form the defined aggregate. Self-organization, then, is the process by which those aggregates create higher-order structures
[...More...]

"Supramolecular Assembly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.