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Nanjing Higher Normal School
Nanjing
Nanjing
University (NJU or NU, simplified Chinese: 南京大学; traditional Chinese: 南京大學; pinyin: Nánjīng Dàxué, Nánkīng Tàhsüéh. Chinese abbr. 南大; pinyin: Nándà, Nanda), or Nanking
Nanking
University, located in Nanjing, China, is one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in China. Since its founding as the Jianye Taixue (建業太學, Jianye Imperial College) in the kingdom of Wu during the Era of Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
in CE 258 [7], it went through different stages of development through the dynasties of ancient China before becoming a modern school in 1902 in late Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
. It became a modern university in the early 1920s, during the early years of Republic of China, becoming the first Chinese modern university which combined teaching and research
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Public University
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities
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Confucianism
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
in IndonesiaKorean ConfucianismJapanese Confucianism
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Sun Xiu
Sun Xiu (235 – 3 September 264),[a] courtesy name Zilie, formally known as Emperor Jing of Wu, was the third emperor of the state of Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
during the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period.Contents1 Early life 2 Coup against Sun Chen 3 Reign 4 Family 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Sun Xiu was born in 235 to Wu's founding emperor, Sun Quan, and one of his concubines, Consort Wang. In his youth, he was praised for his studiousness. About 250, Sun Quan
Sun Quan
arranged for a marriage between Sun Xiu and Lady Zhu, the daughter of Sun Quan's daughter Sun Luyu and her husband Zhu Ju. In 252, just before Sun Quan's death, he enfeoffed Sun Xiu as the Prince of Langya, with his princedom at Hulin (虎林; in present-day Chizhou, Anhui)
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Confucian
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
in IndonesiaKorean ConfucianismJapanese Confucianism
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Six Arts
The Six Arts formed the basis of education in ancient Chinese culture.Contents1 History 2 Influence 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] During the Zhou Dynasty
Zhou Dynasty
(1122–256 BCE), students were required to master the "liù yì" (六藝) (Six Arts):Rites (禮) Music (樂) Archery
Archery
(射) Charioteering (御) Calligraphy (書) Mathematics (數)Men who excelled in these six arts were thought to have reached the state of perfection, a perfect gentleman. The Six Arts were practiced by scholars and they already existed before Confucius, but became a part of Confucian philosophy. As such, Xu Gan (170–217 CE) discusses them in the Balanced Discourses. The Six Arts were practiced by the 72 disciples of Confucius.[1] The Six Arts concept developed during the pre-imperial period. It incorporated both military and civil components
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Wei Zhao (Three Kingdoms)
Wei Zhao (204–273), courtesy name Hongsi, was an official, historian and scholar of the state of Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
during the Three Kingdoms period of China. He shared the same personal name as Sima Zhao (an ancestor of the Jin dynasty emperors) so, in order to avoid naming taboo, the historian Chen Shou
Chen Shou
changed Wei Zhao's personal name to "Yao" when he wrote Wei Zhao's biography in the Sanguozhi (the authoritative source for the history of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period). Life[edit] Wei Zhao was appointed as the first Erudite Libationer (博士祭酒; i.e. President) of the Imperial Nanking University
Imperial Nanking University
by the third Wu emperor, Sun Xiu, in 258. He was the chief editor of the Book of Wu, an official history of Wu
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Fuzimiao
Nanjing
Nanjing
Fuzimiao (Chinese: 南京夫子廟) or Fuzimiao (Chinese: 夫子廟; literally: "Confucian Temple"), is located in southern Nanjing
Nanjing
City on banks of the Qinhuai River. Within the area are cultural attractions, arts, shopping, and entertainment. History[edit] In first year of Jianwu reign of Jin Dynasty (CE 317), Nanking Imperial University was founded, initially on northern bank of Qinhuai River, and in the 3rd year of Xiankang (CE 337) the campus extended to southern bank. Temple of Confucius
Confucius
was firstly constructed in the national school in the 9th year of Taiyuan (CE 384). The place was later destroyed
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Qinhuai River
The Qinhuai River
Qinhuai River
(秦淮河) is a tributary of the Yangtze
Yangtze
with a total length of 110 km. It flows through central Nanjing
Nanjing
and is called "Nanjing's mother river". It is the "life blood" of the city. The Qinhuai River
Qinhuai River
is divided into inner and outer rivers. Today, the scenic belt along the Qinhuai River
Qinhuai River
develops with the Confucius Temple at the center and the river serving as a bond
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Shang Xiang
Shang Xiang (Chinese: 上庠; pinyin: shàng xiáng; Wade–Giles: Shang Hsiang), was a school founded in the Yu Shun (虞舜) era in China. Shun (2257 BCE–2208 BCE), the Emperor of the Kingdom of Yu (虞, or 有虞/Youyu), founded two schools. One was Shang Xiang (shang (上), means up, high), and the other one was Xia Xiang (下庠, xia (下) means down, low).[1][2] Shang Xiang was a place to educate noble youth. Teachers at Shang Xiang were generally erudite, elder and noble persons. The original meaning of Xiang (庠) is provide for (養), and Xiang, including Shang Xiang and Xia Xiang, were initially places to provide for the aged persons, and then became places for aged persons with their knowledge and experiences to teach youth. Shang Xiang is classified as a kind of Guo Xue (國學), meaning the National School in capital city, which is the imperial central school, the nation's supreme school in China, in contrast with regional schools
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Yu The Great
Yu the Great
Yu the Great
(c. 2200 – 2100 BC)[1] was a legendary ruler in ancient China famed for his introduction of flood control, inaugurating dynastic rule in China by establishing the Xia Dynasty, and for his upright moral character.[2][3] The dates proposed for Yu's reign predate the oldest known written records in China, the oracle bones of the late Shang dynasty, by nearly a millennium.[4] No inscriptions on artifacts from the proposed era of Yu, nor the later oracle bones, make any mention of Yu; he does not appear in inscriptions until vessels dating to the Western Zhou period (c. 1045–771 BC). The lack of anything remotely close to contemporary documentary evidence has led to some controversy over the historicity of Yu
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Han Dynasty
Coordinates: 34°09′21″N 108°56′47″E / 34.15583°N 108.94639°E / 34.15583; 108.94639Han dynasty漢朝206 BC–220 ADA map of the Western Han
Western Han
Dynasty in 2 AD: 1) the territory shaded in dark blue represents the principalities and centrally-administered commanderies of the Han Empire; 2) the light blue area shows the extent of the Tarim Basin
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Former Song Dynasty
 MyanmarHistory of ChinaANCIENTNeolithic c. 8500 – c. 2070 BCE Xia dynasty
Xia dynasty
c. 2070 – c. 1600 BCE Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
c. 1600 – c. 1046 BCE Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
c
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Xuan Study
Xuanxue (simplified Chinese: 玄学; traditional Chinese: 玄學; pinyin: Xuánxué; Wade–Giles: Hsüan-hsüeh; literally: "mysterious learning"), Neo-Taoism, or Neo-Daoism was the focal school of thought in Chinese philosophy
Chinese philosophy
from the third to sixth century CE. Xuanxue philosophers combined elements of Confucianism
Confucianism
and Taoism
Taoism
to reinterpret the Yijing, Daodejing, and Zhuangzi.[citation needed] The name compounds xuan 玄 "black, dark; mysterious, profound, abstruse, arcane," occurs in the first chapter of the Lao-tzu
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Taixue
Taixue (Tai-hsueh; simplified Chinese: 太学; traditional Chinese: 太學; literally: "Greatest Study or Learning"), or sometimes called the "Imperial Academy", "Imperial School", "Imperial University"[1][2][3][4] or "Imperial Central University", was the highest rank of educational establishment in Ancient China between the Han Dynasty
Han Dynasty
and Sui Dynasty. The university held 30,000 students and administration during the 2nd century. This provided the Han Dynasty with well-educated bureaucrats
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School Of Naturalists
The School of Naturalists
School of Naturalists
or the School of Yin-yang (陰陽家/阴阳家; Yīnyángjiā; Yin-yang-chia; "School of Yin-Yang") was a Warring States
Warring States
era philosophy that synthesized the concepts of yin-yang and the Five Elements. Overview[edit] Zou Yan is considered the founder of this school.[1] His theory attempted to explain the universe in terms of basic forces in nature: the complementary agents of yin (dark, cold, female, negative) and yang (light, hot, male, positive) and the Five Elements or Five Phases (water, fire, wood, metal, and earth). In its early days, this theory was most strongly associated with the states of Yan and Qi. In later periods, these epistemological theories came to hold significance in both philosophy and popular belief
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