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Namibia
Coordinates: 22°S 17°E / 22°S 17°E / -22; 17 Republic
Republic
of Namibia8 National language namesRepubliek van Namibië  (Afrikaans)[1] Republik Namibia  (German)[2] Namibiab Republiki dib  (Nama)[3] Republika yaNamibia  (Herero)[4] Orepublika yaNamibia  (Kwanyama)[5] Republika zaNamibia  (Kwangali)[6] Repaboleki ya Namibia  (Tswana)[7] Namibia
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Ethnic Groups
An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, society, culture or nation.[1][2] Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art, and physical appearance. Ethnic groups, derived from the same historical founder population, often continue to speak related languages and share a similar gene pool
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Republic
A republic (Latin: res publica) is a form of government in which the country is considered a "public matter", not the private concern or property of the rulers. The primary positions of power within a republic are not inherited. It is a form of government under which the head of state is not a monarch.[1][2][3] In American English, the definition of a republic refers specifically to a form of government in which elected individuals represent the citizen body[2] and exercise power according to the rule of law under a constitution, including separation of powers with an elected head of state, referred to as a constitutional republic[4][5][6][7] or representative democracy. [8] As of 2017[update], 159 of the world's 206 sovereign states use the word "republic" as part of their official names – not all of these are republics in the sense of having elected governments, nor is the word "republic" used in the names of all nations with elected governments
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Upper House
An upper house, sometimes called a senate, is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature (or one of three chambers of a tricameral legislature), the other chamber being the lower house.[1] The house formally designated as the upper house is usually smaller and often has more restricted power than the lower house
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Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place.[1] It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously gentilic was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary.[2][3][4] Examples of demonyms include Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast and Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
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Unitary State
A unitary state is a state governed as a single power in which the central government is ultimately supreme and any administrative divisions (sub-national units) exercise only the powers that the central government chooses to delegate. The majority of states in the world have a unitary system of government. Of the 193 UN member states, 165 are governed as unitary states. In a unitary state, sub-national units are created and abolished (an example being the 22 mainland regions of France
France
being merged into 13), and their powers may be broadened and narrowed, by the central government. Although political power may be delegated through devolution to local governments by statute, the central government remains supreme; it may abrogate the acts of devolved governments or curtail their powers. The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is an example of a unitary state
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Lozi People
The Lozi people
Lozi people
are an ethnic group primarily of western Zambia, inhabiting the region of Barotseland. They number approximately 575,000 in Zambia
Zambia
out of a population of 10 million. Lozi are also found in Namibia
Namibia
(Caprivi Strip), Angola, Botswana, Mozambique (50,000), and Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
(8,000). The Lozi are also known as the Malozi, Silozi, Kololo, Barotose, Rotse, Rozi, Rutse, or Tozvi. The Lozi speak Silozi, a central Bantu language.[1]Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Culture 4 Language 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksName[edit] The word Lozi means 'plain' in the Makololo language, in reference to the Barotse Floodplain
Barotse Floodplain
of the Zambezi on and around which most Lozi live. It may also be spelt Lotse or Rotse, the spelling Lozi having originated with German missionaries in what is now Namibia
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Semi-presidential System
A semi-presidential system is a system of government in which a president exists alongside a prime minister and a cabinet, with the latter two being responsible to the legislature of a state
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Dominant-party System
A dominant-party system or one-party dominant system is a system where there is "a category of parties/political organisations that have successively won election victories and whose future defeat cannot be envisaged or is unlikely for the foreseeable future".[1] Many are de facto one-party systems, and often devolve into de jure one-party systems
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African Union
The African Union
African Union
(AU) is a continental union consisting of all 55 countries on the African continent, extending slightly into Asia via the Sinai Peninsula
Sinai Peninsula
in Egypt. It was established on 26 May 2001 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and launched on 9 July 2002 in South Africa,[6] with the aim of replacing the Organisation of African Unity
Organisation of African Unity
(OAU) established on 25 May 1963 in Addis Ababa, with 32 signatory governments. The most important decisions of the AU are made by the Assembly of the African Union, a semi-annual meeting of the heads of state and government of its member states
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Coloured
Coloureds
Coloureds
(Afrikaans: Kleurlinge) are a multiracial ethnic group native to Southern Africa
Southern Africa
who have ancestry from various populations inhabiting the region, including Khoisan, Bantu speakers, Afrikaners, and sometimes also Austronesians and South Asians. Because of the combination of ethnicities, different families and individuals have a variety of different physical features.[7][8] There were numerous relationships and unions among first, the Europeans and Africans, and later among either of those groups and persons from Asia. In the Western Cape, a distinctive Cape Coloured and affiliated Cape Malay
Cape Malay
culture developed. In other parts of Southern Africa, people classified as Coloured were usually the descendants of individuals from two distinct ethnicities
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Tswana People
The Tswana (Tswana: Batswana, singular Motswana) are a Bantu-speaking ethnic group who are native to Southern Africa. The Tswana language belongs to the Bantu group. Ethnic Tswana made up approximately 79% of the population of Botswana
Botswana
in 2011.[1] In the nineteenth century, a common spelling and pronunciation of Batswana was Bechuana. Europeans therefore referred to the area inhabited by the Tswana as Bechuanaland. In the Tswana language, however, Botswana
Botswana
is the name for the country of the Tswana.Contents1 Dynasties and tribes1.1 Botswana 1.2 South Africa 1.3 Elsewhere2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDynasties and tribes[edit] Botswana[edit] The republic of Botswana
Botswana
(formerly the British protectorate of Bechuanaland) is named for the Tswana people. The country's eight major tribes speak Tswana, which is also called Setswana
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Gciriku Language
Gciriku or Dciriku (Diriku) or Dirico (in Angola), also known as Manyo or Rumanyo, is a Bantu language
Bantu language
spoken by 305,000 people along the Okavango River
Okavango River
in Namibia, Botswana
Botswana
and Angola. It was first known in the west via the Vagciriku, who had migrated from the main Vamanyo area and spoke Rugciriku, a dialect of Rumanyo. The name Gciriku (Dciriku, Diriku) remains common in the literature, but within Namibia the name Rumanyo has been revived.[4] The Mbogedu dialect is extinct; Maho (2009) lists it as a distinct language, and notes that the names 'Manyo' and 'Rumanyo' are inappropriate for it. It is one of several Bantu languages
Bantu languages
of the Okavango which have click consonants, as in [ ǀɛ́ǀˀà] "bed", [mùǀûkò] "flower", and [kàǀûrù] "tortoise"
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Kwangali Language
Kwangali, or RuKwangali, is a Bantu language
Bantu language
spoken by 85,000 people along the Okavango River
Okavango River
in Namibia, where it is a national language, and in Angola. It is one of several Bantu languages
Bantu languages
of the Okavango which have click consonants; these are the dental clicks c and gc, along with prenasalization and aspiration. It also has a nasal glottal approximant. Maho (2009) includes Mbundza as a dialect, but excludes Sambyu, which he includes in Manyo. References[edit]^ Kwangali at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Kwangali". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.  ^ Jouni Filip Maho, 2009. New Updated Guthrie List OnlineDammann, Ernst (1957). Studien zum Kwangali: Grammatik, Texte, Glossar
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