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Nagamaki
The nagamaki (長巻, "long wrapping") is a type of traditionally made Japanese sword
Japanese sword
(nihontō)[1][2] with an extra long handle, used by the samurai class of feudal Japan.[3]Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Use 4 In fiction 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] It is possible that nagamaki were first produced during the Heian period (794 to 1185) but there are no known examples dating from before the mid
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The Fellowship Of The Ring
The Fellowship of the Ring
The Fellowship of the Ring
is the first of three volumes of the epic[2] novel The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. It is followed by The Two Towers
The Two Towers
and The Return of the King. It takes place in the fictional universe of Middle-earth. It was originally published on 29 July 1954 in the United Kingdom
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The Lord Of The Rings
The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
is an epic high fantasy novel written by English author and scholar J. R. R. Tolkien. The story began as a sequel to Tolkien's 1937 fantasy novel The Hobbit, but eventually developed into a much larger work. Written in stages between 1937 and 1949, The Lord of the Rings is one of the best-selling novels ever written, with over 150 million copies sold.[1] The title of the novel refers to the story's main antagonist, the Dark Lord Sauron,[note 1] who had in an earlier age created the One Ring
One Ring
to rule the other Rings of Power
Rings of Power
as the ultimate weapon in his campaign to conquer and rule all of Middle-earth
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Seppuku
Seppuku
Seppuku
(切腹, "cutting [the] belly"), sometimes referred to as harakiri (腹切り, "abdomen/belly cutting", a native Japanese kun reading), is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. It was originally reserved for samurai, but was also practiced by other Japanese people later on to restore honor for themselves or for their family. A samurai practice, seppuku was used either voluntarily by samurai to die with honor rather than fall into the hands of their enemies (and likely suffer torture) or as a form of capital punishment for samurai who had committed serious offenses, or performed because they had brought shame to themselves
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Dark Souls II
Dark Souls
Dark Souls
II[a] is an action role-playing video game developed by FromSoftware
FromSoftware
and published by Bandai Namco Games. The third game in the Souls series, it was released for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. Although both are set in the same universe, there is no direct story connection between the first Dark Souls
Dark Souls
and the sequel.[4] The game uses dedicated multiplayer servers.[4] Taking place in the kingdom of Drangleic, the game features both player versus environment (PvE) and player versus player (PvP) gameplay, in addition to having some co-op components
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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Bamboo
The bamboos /bæmˈbuː/ ( listen) are evergreen perennial flowering plants in the subfamily Bambusoideae of the grass family Poaceae. In bamboo, as in other grasses, the internodal regions of the stem are usually hollow and the vascular bundles in the cross section are scattered throughout the stem instead of in a cylindrical arrangement. The dicotyledonous woody xylem is also absent. The absence of secondary growth wood causes the stems of monocots, including the palms and large bamboos, to be columnar rather than tapering.[3] Bamboos include some of the fastest-growing plants in the world,[4] due to a unique rhizome-dependent system. Certain species of bamboo can grow 91 cm (36 in) within a 24-hour period, at a rate of almost 4 cm (1.6 in) an hour (a growth around 1 mm every 90 seconds, or 1 inch every 40 minutes).[5] Giant bamboos are the largest members of the grass family
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Araki-ryū
Araki-ryū (荒木流?) is a Japanese koryū martial art founded in the during the Sengoku jidai
Sengoku jidai
by the bushi Araki Mujinsai Minamoto no Hidenawa (荒木夢仁斎源秀縄). Araki-ryu is a comprehensive system that specializes in the use and application of many traditional Japanese weapons such as spear, glaive, long and short sword, staff, rope, chain and sickle, jujutsu (torite), grappling in armor with weapons (kogusoku), ETC.Contents1 Introduction 2 The founder: Araki Mujinsai Minamoto no Hidenawa 荒木夢仁斎源秀縄 3 Esoteric teachings 4 Modern times 5 References 6 External linksIntroduction[edit] Araki Ryu was founded in the Tensho period, approximately 1573. Its creation is attributed to Araki Mujinsai (or Muninsai) Minamoto no Hidenawa. The torite-kogusoku (grappling with weaponry in armor) techniques are the central focus of the ryuha
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The Two Towers
The Two Towers
The Two Towers
is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkien's high fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. It is preceded by The Fellowship of the Ring and followed by The Return of the King.Contents1 Title 2 Plot summary2.1 Book III: The Treason of Isengard 2.2 Book IV: The Ring Goes East3 Critical reception 4 Adaptations 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTitle[edit] The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
is composed of six "books", aside from an introduction, a prologue and six appendices
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Shaku (unit)
The shaku (Japanese: 尺) or Japanese foot[1][2] is a Japanese unit of length derived (but varying) from the Chinese chi, originally based upon the distance measured by a human hand from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the forefinger[3] (compare span)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Glossary Of Japanese Swords
A glossary, also known as a vocabulary or clavis, is an alphabetical list of terms in a particular domain of knowledge with the definitions for those terms. Traditionally, a glossary appears at the end of a book and includes terms within that book that are either newly introduced, uncommon, or specialized. While glossaries are most commonly associated with non-fiction books, in some cases, fiction novels may come with a glossary for unfamiliar terms. A bilingual glossary is a list of terms in one language defined in a second language or glossed by synonyms (or at least near-synonyms) in another language. In a general sense, a glossary contains explanations of concepts relevant to a certain field of study or action. In this sense, the term is related to the notion of ontology
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Echigo Province
Echigo Province
Echigo Province
(越後国, Echigo no kuni) was an old province in north-central Japan, on the shores of the Sea of Japan. It bordered on Uzen, Iwashiro, Kōzuke, Shinano, and Etchū Provinces.[1] It corresponds today to Niigata Prefecture, minus the island of Sado. Its abbreviated form name was Esshū (越州), with Echizen and Etchū Provinces
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Daimyō
The daimyō (大名, IPA: [daimʲoː] ( listen)) were powerful Japanese feudal lords[1] who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings. In the term, dai (大) means "large", and myō stands for myōden (名田), meaning private land.[2] Subordinate only to the shōgun, daimyōs were the most powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. From the Shugo of the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
through the Sengoku to the daimyōs of the Edo
Edo
period, the rank had a long and varied history
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Uesugi Kenshin
Uesugi Kenshin
Uesugi Kenshin
(上杉 謙信, February 18, 1530 – April 19, 1578) was a daimyō who was born as Nagao Kagetora,[1] and after the adoption into the Uesugi clan, ruled Echigo Province
Echigo Province
in the Sengoku period of Japan.[2] He was one of the most powerful daimyōs of the Sengoku period. While chiefly remembered for his prowess on the battlefield, Kenshin is also regarded as an extremely skillful administrator who fostered the growth of local industries and trade; his rule saw a marked rise in the standard of living of Echigo.[citation needed] Kenshin is famed for his honourable conduct, his military expertise, a long-standing rivalry with Takeda Shingen, his numerous campaigns to restore order in the Kantō region
Kantō region
as the Kanto Kanrei, and his belief in the Buddhist god of war—Bishamonten
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