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Mythopoeic Award
The Mythopoeic Awards for literature and literary studies are given by the Mythopoeic Society
Mythopoeic Society
to authors of outstanding works in the fields of myth, fantasy, and the scholarly study of these areas.[1] From 1971 to 1991 there were two awards, annual but not always awarded before 1981, recognizing Mythopoeic Fantasy and Mythopoeic Scholarship ( Inklings
Inklings
Studies)
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Carol Kendall
Carol Seeger "Siggy" Kendall (September 13, 1917 – July 28, 2012) was an American writer of children's books.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Marriage and family 3 Writing career 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Carol Kendall was born in Bucyrus, Ohio, and was a graduate of Ohio University.[1] Some of her first books were directed at adults such as "The Black Seven" (1946) and "The Baby Snatcher" (1952). It was her travels across the world that inspired her folk tale stories. She even gathered old folk tales from other countries and translated them into English for children. Despite her love for traveling, she always loved returning to her home on Holiday Drive and to Kansas.[2] Marriage and family[edit] Carol Kendall married Paul Murray Kendall. He was an English professor, historian, and a biographer
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Unfinished Tales
Unfinished Tales
Unfinished Tales
of Númenor
Númenor
and Middle-earth
Middle-earth
is a collection of stories and essays by J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien
that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. Unlike The Silmarillion, for which the narrative fragments were modified to connect into a consistent and coherent work, the Unfinished Tales
Unfinished Tales
are presented as Tolkien
Tolkien
left them, with little more than names changed (the author having had a confusing habit of trying out different names for a character while writing a draft). Thus some of these are incomplete stories, while others are collections of information about Middle-earth
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Peter S. Beagle
Hugo Award 2006 Nebula Award 2007 World Fantasy
Fantasy
Award for Life Achievement 2011 Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award 2018Peter Soyer Beagle (born April 20, 1939) is an American novelist and screenwriter, especially fantasy fiction.[1] His best-known work is The Last Unicorn
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A. S. Byatt
Dame Antonia Susan Duffy DBE HonFBA (née Drabble; born 24 August 1936), known professionally as A. S. Byatt
A. S. Byatt
(/ˈbaɪ.ət/ BY-ət),[1] is an English novelist, poet and Booker Prize
Booker Prize
winner. In 2008, The Times newspaper named her on its list of the 50 greatest British writers since 1945.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Writing career 3 Memberships 4 Prizes and awards 5 Works5.1 Fiction 5.2 Short story collections 5.3 Essays and biographies 5.4 Texts edited6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Byatt was born in Sheffield
Sheffield
as Antonia Susan Drabble, the eldest child of John Drabble, QC, and Kathleen Bloor, a scholar of Browning.[3] Her sisters are the novelist Margaret Drabble
Margaret Drabble
and the art historian Helen Langdon
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Jane Yolen
Jane Hyatt Yolen (born February 11, 1939) is an American writer of fantasy, science fiction, and children's books. She is the author or editor of more than 365 books, of which the best known is The Devil's Arithmetic, a Holocaust novella.[1] Her other works include the Nebula Award-winning short story Sister Emily's Lightship, the novelette Lost Girls, Owl Moon, The Emperor and the Kite, the Commander Toad
Commander Toad
series and How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight.[2] She gave the lecture for the 1989 Alice G. Smith Lecture, the inaugural year for the series
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Something Rich And Strange
The following is a list of episodes of the Australian television series SeaChange
SeaChange
which ran from 1998 to 2000 on ABC TV.Contents1 Season 1: 1998 2 Season 2: 1999 3 Season 3: 2000 4 External linksSeason 1: 1998[edit]# Title Director Author Original air date1 "Something Rich and Strange" Michael Carson Andrew Knight 10 May 1998 (1998-05-10).In just 24 hours, corporate lawyer Laura Gibson's life is decimated. She is passed up for partnership, her son is expelled and she almost kills the family cat before discovering her husband has been arrested for fraud, squandering their life savings in the process...not to mention sleeping with her sister. Desperate to escape her life, Laura accepts a job as magistrate of a small coastal town she has fond - ten-year-old - memories of. Packing her kids in the station wagon, Laura heads to Pearl Bay only to find a half collapsed connecting bridge and laconic local, Diver Dan
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Robin McKinley
Jennifer Carolyn Robin McKinley
Robin McKinley
(born November 16, 1952), known as Robin McKinley, is an American author of fantasy and children's books. Her 1984 novel The Hero and the Crown
The Hero and the Crown
won the Newbery Medal
Newbery Medal
as the year's best new American children's book. As of 2015[update] McKinley has written or contributed to twenty books
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Little, Big
Little, Big: or, The Fairies' Parliament is a modern fantasy novel by John Crowley, published in 1981. It won the World Fantasy
Fantasy
Award in 1982.[1][2][3]Contents1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Literary significance 4 Awards and nominations 5 Release details 6 Notes 7 External linksPlot[edit] Turn-of-the-century architect John Drinkwater begins to suspect that within this world there lies another (and beyond that, another and another ad infinitum, each larger than the world that contains it). Towards the centre is the realm of Faerie. Every time a generation or epoch moves deeper within these realms, another follows behind them, entering the realm they have vacated. Drinkwater gathered his thoughts into an ever evolving series of books entitled “The Architecture of Country Houses”, although few readers grasped the point he was trying to convey. Somewhere around the start of the 20th century, Drinkwater designed and built a house called Edgewood
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J. R. R. Tolkien
First World WarBattle of the SommeJohn Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE FRSL (/ˈtɒlkiːn/;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis—they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings
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Poul Anderson
Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926 – July 31, 2001)[2] was an American science fiction author who began his career in the 1940s and continued to write into the 21st century. Anderson authored several works of fantasy, historical novels, and short stories. His awards include seven Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Political, moral and literary themes2.1 Space and liberty 2.2 World government 2.3 Libertarianism 2.4 Fairness to the adversaries 2.5 Underestimating "primitives" as a costly mistake 2.6 Tragic conflicts3 Awards 4 Bibliography 5 Fictional appearances 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Poul Anderson
Poul Anderson
was born on November 25, 1926, in Bristol, Pennsylvania, of Scandinavian parents.[4] Shortly after his birth, his father, Anton Anderson, an engineer, moved the family to Texas, where they lived for over ten years
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Orson Scott Card
Orson Scott Card
Orson Scott Card
(born August 24, 1951) is an American novelist, critic, public speaker, essayist, and columnist. He writes in several genres but is known best for science fiction. His novel Ender's Game (1985) and its sequel Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
(1986) both won Hugo[2][3] and Nebula Awards,[2][4] making Card the only author to win both science fiction's top U.S. prizes in consecutive years.[5][6] A feature film adaptation of Ender's Game, which Card co-produced, was released in 2013.[7] Card is a professor of English at Southern Virginia University,[8] has written two books on creative writing, hosts writing bootcamps and workshops, and serves as a judge in the Writers of the Future contest.[9] A great-great-grandson of Brigham Young, Card is a practicing member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church)
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The Hollow Hills
The Hollow Hills
The Hollow Hills
is a novel by Mary Stewart. It is the second in a quintet of novels covering the Arthurian Legends. This book is preceded by The Crystal Cave
The Crystal Cave
and succeeded by The Last Enchantment. The Hollow Hills
The Hollow Hills
was written in 1970 and published in 1973. Plot summary[edit] The protagonist and narrator is Merlin, who supervises the birth and raising of King Arthur. (In this version, Merlin's father is Aurelius Ambrosius, so he is Arthur's cousin.) The Duchess Ygraine is said to have conspired with him to herself bear Arthur to Uther Pendragon; whereafter Merlin
Merlin
goes into hiding, to evade accusations, and learns that Uther wishes the child to be hidden, until another (legitimate) son is born
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Inklings
The Inklings
Inklings
were an informal literary discussion group associated with the University of Oxford, England, for nearly two decades between the early 1930s and late 1949.[1] The Inklings
Inklings
were literary enthusiasts who praised the value of narrative in fiction and encouraged the writing of fantasy.Contents1 Members 2 Meetings 3 Legacy 4 The Inklings
Inklings
in fiction 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksMembers[edit] The Eagle and Child
The Eagle and Child
pub (commonly known as the Bird and Baby or simply just the Bird) in Oxford
Oxford
where the Inklings
Inklings
met informally on Tuesday mornings during term.The more regular members of the Inklings, many of them academics at the University, included:Owen Barfield J. A. W. Bennett Lord David Cecil Nevill Coghill Hugo Dyson Adam Fox Roger Lancelyn Green Robert Havard C. S
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A Woman Of The Iron People
A Woman of the Iron People
A Woman of the Iron People
is an anthropological science fiction novel by Eleanor Arnason, originally published in 1991. It is a first contact story between peoples from a future Earth and an intelligent, furred race of people who live on an unnamed planet far from Earth. Along with White Queen, A Woman of the Iron People
A Woman of the Iron People
won the inaugural James Tiptree Jr. Award in 1991. The later paperback edition consisted of two separate volumes, In the Light of Sigma Draconis and Changing Women, split at the natural dividing point of the novel. Plot[edit] A Woman of the Iron People
A Woman of the Iron People
is divided into two parts. The first primarily deals with Lixia's growing understanding and involvement with life on the planet
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Mary Stewart (novelist)
Mary, Lady Stewart (born Mary Florence Elinor Rainbow; 17 September 1916 – 9 May 2014), was a British novelist who developed the romantic mystery genre, featuring smart, adventurous heroines who could hold their own in dangerous situations. She also wrote children's books and poetry, but may be best known for her Merlin series, which straddles the boundary between the historical novel and fantasy.Contents1 Biography1.1 Personal life 1.2 Writing career2 Bibliography2.1 Romantic suspense novels 2.2 The Merlin Trilogy 2.3 The Novel of Mordred 2.4 Children's novels 2.5 Poetry3 References3.1 Bibliography4 External linksBiography[edit] Personal life[edit] Mary Stewart was born on 17 September 1916 in Sunderland, County Durham, England, UK, daughter of Mary Edith Matthews, from New Zealand, and Frederick Rainbow, a vicar.[1][2] She graduated from Durham University
Durham University
in 1938 with first-class honours in English
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