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Myanmar Police Force
The Myanmar
Myanmar
Police Force, formally known as The People's Police Force (Burmese: ပြည်သူ့ရဲတပ်ဖွဲ့; MLCTS: Pyi Thu Yae Tup Pwe), was established in 1964 as an independent department under the Ministry of Home Affairs. It was reorganised on 1 October 1995 and informally became part of the Tatmadaw
Tatmadaw
(Armed Forces of Myanmar).Contents1 History1.1 British rule in Myanmar 1.2 Post-independence (1948-present)2 Organisation2.1 State and Division Police Forces 2.2 Special
Special
Departments 2.3 Others Major
Major
Departments 2.4 Training Centres2.4.1 No. 1 Police Training Depot 2.4.2 No
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Indian Imperial Police
The Indian Imperial Police, referred to variously as the Indian (Imperial) Police or simply the Indian Police or, by 1905,[1] Imperial Police, was part of the Indian Police Services, the uniform system of police administration in British India, as established by India
India
Act 5 of 1861. Its members ruled more than 300 million people in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh
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Pegu
Bago (formerly spelt Pegu;[1] Burmese: ပဲခူးမြို့; MLCTS: pai: khu: mrui., IPA: [bəɡó mjo̰]; Mon: ဗဂေါ, [həkɜ̀]), formerly known as Hanthawaddy (Burmese: ဟံသာဝတီ; Mon: ဟံသာဝတဳ Hongsawatoi; Pali: Haṃsāvatī; meaning "She Who Has Swans"), is a city and the capital of the Bago Region
Bago Region
in Myanmar. It is located 91 kilometres (57 mi) north-east of Yangon.Contents1 History 2 Places of interest 3 Sports 4 Health care 5 Education 6 Notes 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further readingHistory[edit]The 177 ft (54 m) Shwethalyaung Buddha, constructed in 994 A.D
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Non-commissioned Officer
A non-commissioned officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO, colloquially non-com or noncom) is a military officer who has not earned a commission.[1][2][3] Such is also called sub-officer in some countries. Non-commissioned officers, in the English-speaking world, usually obtain their position of authority by promotion through the enlisted ranks.[4] In contrast, commissioned officers hold higher ranks than NCOs, have more legal responsibilities, are paid more, and often have more non-military training such as a university diploma. Commissioned officers
Commissioned officers
usually earn their commissions without having risen through the enlisted ranks
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Highway Patrol
A highway patrol is either a police unit created primarily for the purpose of overseeing and enforcing traffic safety compliance on roads and highways, or a detail within an existing local or regional police agency that is primarily concerned with such duties
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Security Guard
A security guard (also known as a security officer or protective agent) is a person employed by a public or private party to protect the employing party’s assets (property, people, equipment, money, etc.) from a variety of hazards (such as waste, damaged property, unsafe worker behavior, criminal activity such as theft, etc.) by enforcing preventative measures
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Battalion
A battalion is a military unit. The use of the term "battalion" varies by nationality and branch of service. Typically a battalion consists of 300 to 800 soldiers and is divided into a number of companies. A battalion is typically commanded by a lieutenant colonel. In some countries the word "battalion" is associated with the infantry. The term was first used in Italian as battaglione no later than the 16th century
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Commandant
Commandant (/ˌkɒmənˈdɑːnt/ or /ˌkɒmənˈdænt/) is a title often given to the officer in charge of a military (or other uniformed service) training establishment or academy. This usage is common in English-speaking nations. In some countries it may be a military or police rank. It is also often used to refer to the commander of a military prison or prison camp (including concentration camps and prisoner of war camps).Contents1 France 2 India 3 Ireland 4 South Africa 5 New Zealand 6 Sri Lanka 7 United Kingdom 8 United States 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksFrance[edit] In the French Army
French Army
and French Air Force, the term commandant is used as a rank equivalent to major (NATO rank code OF-3)
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Diplomat
A diplomat is a person appointed by a state to conduct diplomacy with one or more other states or international organizations. The main functions of diplomats are: representation and protection of the interests and nationals of the sending state; initiation and facilitation of strategic agreements; treaties and conventions; promotion of information; trade and commerce; technology; and friendly relations. Seasoned diplomats of international repute are used in international organisations (e.g. United Nations) as well as multinational companies for their experience in management and negotiating skills. Diplomats are members of foreign services and diplomatic corps of various nations of the world. Diplomats are the oldest form of any of the foreign policy institutions of the state, predating by centuries foreign ministers and ministerial offices
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Yangon
Yangon
Yangon
(Burmese: ရန်ကုန်မြို့, MLCTS rankun mrui, pronounced [jàɴɡòʊɴ mjo̰]; formerly known as Rangoon, literally: "End of Strife") is the capital of the Yangon Region of Myanmar, also known as Burma
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Sagaing
Sagaing
Sagaing
(Burmese: စစ်ကိုင်းမြို့; MLCTS: cac kuing: mrui) is the capital of Sagaing Region
Sagaing Region
(formerly Sagaing Division). Located on the Irrawaddy River, 20 km to the south-west of Mandalay
Mandalay
on the opposite bank of the river, Sagaing, with numerous Buddhist
Buddhist
monasteries is an important religious and monastic centre. The pagodas and monasteries crowd the numerous hills along the ridge running parallel to the river
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Mon State
Mon State
Mon State
(Burmese: မွန်ပြည်နယ်, pronounced [mʊ̀ɴ pjìnɛ̀]; Mon: တွဵုရးဍုၚ်မန်၊ ရးမညဒေသ) is an administrative division of Myanmar. It lies between Kayin State
Kayin State
to the east, the Andaman Sea
Andaman Sea
to the west, Bago Region
Bago Region
to the north and Tanintharyi Region
Tanintharyi Region
to the south, also having a short border with Thailand's Kanchanaburi Province
Kanchanaburi Province
at its south-eastern tip. The land area is 12,155 km2. The Dawna Range, running along the eastern side of the state in a NNW–SSE direction, forms a natural border with Kayin State. Mon State
Mon State
includes some small islands, such as Kalegauk, Wa Kyun
Wa Kyun
and Kyungyi Island, along its 566 km of coastline
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Light Infantry
Light infantry
Light infantry
is a designation applied to certain types of foot soldiers (infantry) throughout history, typically having lighter equipment or armament or a more mobile or fluid function than other types of infantry, such as heavy infantry or line infantry. Historically, light infantry often fought as skirmishers — soldiers who fight in a loose formation ahead of the main army to harass, delay and generally "soften up" an enemy before the main battle
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Brigadier General
Brigadier
Brigadier
general (Brig. Gen.) is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000 troops (four battalions). In some countries a brigadier general is informally designated as a one-star general (OF-6). In some countries, this rank is given the name of brigadier, which is often considered not to be a general-officer rank, but is usually equivalent to brigadier general in the armies of nations that use the rank. The rank can be traced back to the militaries of Europe where a brigadier general, or simply a brigadier, would command a brigade in the field
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Major General
Major
Major
general (abbreviated MG,[1] Maj. Gen. and similar) is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a lieutenant general outranks a major general. (Although a major outranks a lieutenant, a lieutenant outranks a sergeant-major). In the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
and the United States, it is a division commander's rank subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general
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Brigadier General
Brigadier
Brigadier
general (Brig. Gen.) is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000 troops (four battalions). In some countries a brigadier general is informally designated as a one-star general (OF-6). In some countries, this rank is given the name of brigadier, which is often considered not to be a general-officer rank, but is usually equivalent to brigadier general in the armies of nations that use the rank. The rank can be traced back to the militaries of Europe where a brigadier general, or simply a brigadier, would command a brigade in the field
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