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My Son, The Physicist
"My Son, the Physicist" is a science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. It was commissioned by Hoffman Electronics Corporation and appeared in February 1962 in Scientific American. It later appeared in Asimov's collection Nightfall and Other Stories (1969). Plot summary[edit] Gerard Cremona, a communications engineer with an American space agency, is trying to maintain communication that has been established with an expedition that has apparently reached the planet Pluto
Pluto
after four years in space. The difficulty lies in the significant delays for the radio signal to travel back and forth, making timely and meaningful interaction impossible. His proud mother, who happens to visit his office whilst he is wrestling with the problem, ultimately advises him to keep talking and get the expedition crew to keep talking as well
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Science Fiction
Science
Science
fiction (often shortened to SF or sci-fi) is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, spaceflight, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science
Science
fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas".[1] It usually avoids the supernatural, unlike the related genre of fantasy
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Pluto
Pluto
Pluto
(minor-planet designation: 134340 Pluto) is a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, a ring of bodies beyond Neptune. It was the first Kuiper belt
Kuiper belt
object to be discovered. Pluto
Pluto
was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh
Clyde Tombaugh
in 1930 and was originally considered to be the ninth planet from the Sun. After 1992, its status as a planet was questioned following the discovery of several objects of similar size in the Kuiper belt. In 2005, Eris, a dwarf planet in the scattered disc which is 27% more massive than Pluto, was discovered. This led the International Astronomical Union
International Astronomical Union
(IAU) to define the term "planet" formally in 2006, during their 26th General Assembly
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Short Story
A short story is a piece of prose fiction that can be read in one sitting. Emerging from earlier oral storytelling traditions in the 17th century, the short story has grown to encompass a body of work so diverse as to defy easy characterization. At its most prototypical the short story features a small cast of named characters, and focuses on a self-contained incident with the intent of evoking a "single effect" or mood.[1] In doing so, short stories make use of plot, resonance, and other dynamic components to a far greater degree than is typical of an anecdote, yet to a far lesser degree than a novel. While the short story is largely distinct from the novel, authors of both generally draw from a common pool of literary techniques. Short stories have no set length
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
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Radio
Radio
Radio
is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width.[n 1] When radio waves strike an electrical conductor, the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form. Radio
Radio
systems need a transmitter to modulate (change) some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it, for example using amplitude modulation or angle modulation (which can be frequency modulation or phase modulation). Radio
Radio
systems also need an antenna to convert electric currents into radio waves, and radio waves into an electric current. An antenna can be used for both transmitting and receiving
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Internet Speculative Fiction Database
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction.[2][3] The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing[4] and there is support within both and ISFDB for interlinking.[5] The data is reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.[6]Contents1 Purpose 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] The ISFDB database indexes authors, novels, short stories, publishers, awards, and magazines. Additionally, it supports author pseudonyms, series, awards, and cover art plus interior illustration credits which is combined into integrated author, artist, and publisher bibliographies
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Engineer
Engineers, as practitioners of engineering, are people who invent, design, analyse, build and test machines, systems, structures and materials to fulfill objectives and requirements while considering the limitations imposed by practicality, regulation, safety, and cost.[1][2] The word engineer ( Latin
Latin
ingeniator[3]) is derived from the Latin
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Scientific American
Scientific American
Scientific American
(informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 170 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).Contents1 History 2 International editions 3 First issue 4 Editors 5 Special
Special
issues 6 Scientific American
Scientific American
50 award 7 Website 8 Columns 9 Television 10 Books 11 Scientific and political debate 12 Awards 13 Top 10 Science Stories of the Year 14 Controversy 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksHistory[edit] Scientific American
Scientific American
was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845[2] as a four-page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov
(/ˈæzɪmɒv/;[b][c] c. January 2, 1920[a] – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston
Boston
University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer who wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards.[d] His books have been published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.[1] Asimov wrote hard science fiction. Along with Robert A. Heinlein
Robert A. Heinlein
and Arthur C. Clarke, Asimov was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime.[2] Asimov's most famous work is the "Foundation" series;[3] his other major series are the "Galactic Empire" series and the Robot
Robot
series
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Segregationist (short Story)
"Segregationist" is a science fiction short story by American writer Isaac Asimov. The story was written in April 1967 and was first published in December in Abbottempo, a magazine produced by Abbott Laboratories, then later included in the collections Nightfall and Other Stories (1969), The Complete Robot
The Complete Robot
(1982) and Robot Visions (1990). Plot summary[edit] The story depicts a future where robotic prosthetics for humans and artificially-created organic body-parts for robots (known as Metallos) are commonplace. Metallos have been granted equal status with 'normal' humans. A man, who has been granted the right to long life (possibly immortality) by an official Board of Mortality, meets the surgeon who is to assist in the performance of heart replacement surgery on the man. The surgeon offers him a choice between a metallic or semi-organic heart
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Eyes Do More Than See
"Eyes Do More Than See" is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov.Contents1 Background 2 Plot summary 3 Notes 4 External linksBackground[edit] In 1964, Playboy
Playboy
magazine approached several science fiction writers to create short-short stories based on a photograph of a clay head without ears. The selected stories — Arthur C. Clarke's "Playback", Frederik Pohl's "Lovemaking", and Thomas M. Disch's "Cephalatron" (later "Fun with Your New Head") — were published in the December 1966 issue.[1] Playboy
Playboy
had rejected Asimov's story, so he submitted it to the Magazine
Magazine
of Fantasy and Science Fiction, which published it in April 1965
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Nobody Here But—
"Nobody Here But—" is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. It was first published in the 1953 issue of Star Science Fiction Stories. Plot summary[edit] Mathematician Cliff Anderson and Electrical Engineer Bill Billings work at an Institute of Technology. The time is assumed to be the present, as the two men have just built a 'small' calculating machine that measures three feet high by six feet long and two feet deep — a machine which would have seemed normal by the standards of the early 1950s. Bill longs to marry his girlfriend Mary Ann, but he is too shy to get up the courage to ask her. The two friends have been working on further developing the machine, which they call 'Junior', increasing its abilities and reducing its size. But they find one day, visiting their laboratory with Mary Ann, that 'Junior' has gone into business for itself and is more advanced than they have realised
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The Machine That Won The War (short Story)
"The Machine That Won the War" is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. The story first appeared in the October 1961 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and was reprinted in the collections Nightfall and Other Stories
Nightfall and Other Stories
(1969) and Robot Dreams (1986). It was also printed in a contemporary edition of Reader's Digest, illustrated. It is one of a loosely connected series of such stories concerning a fictional computer called Multivac. Plot summary[edit] Three influential leaders of the human race meet in the aftermath of a successful war against the Denebians
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What Is This Thing Called Love? (short Story)
"What Is This Thing Called Love?" is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. The story was requested by Cele Goldsmith Lalli, editor of Amazing Stories, as a satire of a story in Playboy magazine called "Girls for the Slime God", which proposed — not too seriously — that all science fiction stories were concerned with aliens and sex. Asimov set out to write a story telling how a sex-interested alien and humans might really interact. The story appeared in the March 1961 issue of Amazing as "Playboy and the Slime God", but when Asimov included it in his 1969 collection Nightfall and Other Stories he retitled it "What Is This Thing Called Love?" Goldsmith Lalli rewrote the story's last three paragraphs, a change Asimov regarded as a great improvement, and which he kept. Plot synopsis[edit] Non-human aliens from the other end of the Galaxy visit Earth and kidnap two humans, a man and a woman
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