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Music Of Angola
The music of Angola
Angola
has been shaped both by wider musical trends and by the political history of the country.[1] while Angolan music has also influenced the music of the other Lusophone countries. In turn, the music of Angola
Angola
was instrumental in creating and reinforcing angolanidade, the Angolan national identity.[2] The capital and largest city of Angola
Angola
Luanda
Luanda
— is home to a diverse group of styles including merengue, kilapanda, zouk, semba, kizomba and kuduro. Just off the coast of Luanda
Luanda
is Ilha do Cabo, home to an accordion and harmonica-based style of music called rebita. In the 20th century, Angola
Angola
was wracked by violence and political instability
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Xylophone
The xylophone (from the Greek words ξύλον—xylon, "wood"[1] + φωνή—phōnē, "sound, voice",[2] meaning "wooden sound") is a musical instrument in the percussion family that consists of wooden bars struck by mallets. Each bar is an idiophone tuned to a pitch of a musical scale, whether pentatonic or heptatonic in the case of many African and Asian instruments, diatonic in many western children's instruments, or chromatic for orchestral use. The term xylophone may be used generally, to include all such instruments such as the marimba, balafon and even the semantron. However, in the orchestra, the term xylophone refers specifically to a chromatic instrument of somewhat higher pitch range and drier timbre than the marimba, and these two instruments should not be confused. The term is also popularly used to refer to similar instruments of the lithophone and metallophone types
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Funeral
A funeral is a ceremony connected with the burial, cremation, etc. of the body of a dead person, or the burial (or equivalent) with the attendant observances.[1] Funerary customs comprise the complex of beliefs and practices used by a culture to remember and respect the dead, from interment itself, to various monuments, prayers, and rituals undertaken in their honor. Customs vary widely both between cultures and between religious groups and denominations within cultures. Common secular motivations for funerals include mourning the deceased, celebrating their life, and offering support and sympathy to the bereaved
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Harmonica
The harmonica, also known as a French harp or mouth organ, is a free reed wind instrument used worldwide in many musical genres, notably in blues, American folk music, classical music, jazz, country, and rock and roll. There are many types of harmonica, including diatonic, chromatic, tremolo, octave, orchestral, and bass versions. A harmonica is played by using the mouth (lips and tongue) to direct air into or out of one or more holes along a mouthpiece. Behind each hole is a chamber containing at least one reed. A harmonica reed is a flat elongated spring typically made of brass, stainless steel, or bronze, which is secured at one end over a slot that serves as an airway. When the free end is made to vibrate by the player's air, it alternately blocks and unblocks the airway to produce sound. Reeds are pre-tuned to individual pitches. Tuning may involve changing a reeds length, the weight near its free end, or the stiffness near its fixed end
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Titica
Titica is an Angolan singer and dancer, who performs a local form of rap-techno music called "kuduro". She was named "best kuduro artist of 2011".[1] Life[edit] Born Teca Miguel Garcia in Luanda, Titica began her career as a backing dancer with acts such as Noite e Dia, Propria Lixa and Puto Portugues.[1][2] She released her first track as a vocalist in October 2011, "Chão", which soon became a big hit both in Angola and the Angolan diaspora.[1] In 2013, she was named a goodwill ambassador for UNAIDS.[3] Titica performed in Brazil
Brazil
in 2017. where she released her song, "Capim Guiné" with the band Baina System in Rio de Janeiro.[4][5] Present 2011–2012: "O Chão..." and "Olha o Boneco" song[edit] On 15 December 2011, Titica announced her first work called O Chão. With the gorgeous single "Olha o Boneco" featuring the African-Portuguese Ary. The song joins a few kuduro moving and 'créu'
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Trumpet
BrassWind Brass Aerophone Hornbostel–Sachs classification 423.233 (Valved aerophone sounded by lip movement)Playing rangeWritten range:Related instrumentsFlugelhorn, cornet, cornett, Flumpet, bugle, natural trumpet, bass trumpet, post horn, Roman tuba, buccina, cornu, lituus, shofar, dord, dung chen, sringa, shankha, lur, didgeridoo, Alphorn, Russian horns, serpent, ophicleide, piccolo trumpet, horn, alto horn, baritone horn, pocket trumpetPart of a series onMusical instrumentsWoodwindsPiccolo Flute Oboe Cor anglais Clarinet Saxophone Bassoon Contrabassoon Bagpipes RecorderGarklein in C6 (c‴) Sopranino in F5 (f″) Soprano in C5 (c″) Alto in F4 (f′)
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Panflute
The pan flutes (also known as panpipes or syrinx) are a group of musical instruments based on the principle of the closed tube, consisting of multiple pipes of gradually increasing length (and occasionally girth). Multiple varieties of pan flutes have long been popular as folk instruments. The pipes are typically made from bamboo, giant cane, or local reeds. Other materials include wood, plastic, metal and ivory.Contents1 Etymology 2 Structure2.1 Acoustics3 Playing 4 Variations4.1 Types5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The pan flute is named after Pan, the Greek god of nature and shepherds often depicted with such an instrument.Pan and Daphnis – 1st century BC Roman replica of 2nd century BC Greek originalIn Greek mythology, Syrinx (Σύριγξ) was a forest Nymph. In her attempt to escape the affection of god Pan (a creature half he-goat and half man), she was transformed in water-reed or calamos (cane-reed)
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Africa
Africa
Africa
is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent (the first being Asia
Asia
in both categories). At about 30.3 million km2 (11.7 million square miles) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth's total surface area and 20% of its total land area.[3] With 1.2 billion[1] people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the north, both the Suez Canal and the Red Sea
Red Sea
along the Sinai Peninsula
Sinai Peninsula
to the northeast, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west. The continent includes Madagascar
Madagascar
and various archipelagos
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Slavery In Brazil
Slavery
Slavery
in Brazil
Brazil
began long before the first Portuguese settlement was established in 1532, as members of one tribe would enslave captured members of another.[1] Later, colonists were heavily dependent on indigenous labor during the initial phases of settlement to maintain the subsistence economy, and natives were often captured by expeditions called bandeiras. The importation of African slaves began midway through the 16th century, but the enslavement of indigenous peoples continued well into the 17th and 18th centuries. During the Atlantic slave trade
Atlantic slave trade
era, Brazil
Brazil
imported more African slaves than any other country
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Cautionary Tale
A cautionary tale is a tale told in folklore, to warn its listener of a danger. There are three essential parts to a cautionary tale, though they can be introduced in a large variety of ways. First, a taboo or prohibition is stated: some act, location, or thing is said to be dangerous. Then, the narrative itself is told: someone disregarded the warning and performed the forbidden act. Finally, the violator comes to an unpleasant fate, which is frequently related in expansive and grisly detail.Contents1 Cautionary tales and conformity 2 Reactions to cautionary tales 3 References 4 See alsoCautionary tales and conformity[edit] Cautionary tales are ubiquitous in popular culture; many urban legends are framed as cautionary tales: from the lover's lane haunted by a hook-handed murderer to the tale of a man who shot a cactus for fun only to die when the plant toppled onto him. Like horror fiction, generally the cautionary tale exhibits an ambivalent attitude towards social taboos
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Parties
A party is a gathering of people who have been invited by a host for the purposes of socializing, conversation, recreation, or as part of a festival or other commemoration of a special occasion. A party will typically feature food and beverages, and often music and dancing or other forms of entertainment
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Saxophone
Military band
Military band
family:Sopranino saxophone Soprano saxophone Alto saxophone Tenor saxophone Baritone saxophone Bass saxophone Contrabass saxophone Subcontrabass saxophoneOrchestral family:C soprano saxophone Mezzo-soprano saxophone C melody saxophoneOther saxophones: Sopranissimo saxophone
Sopranissimo saxophone
('Soprillo') TubaxMusiciansList of saxophonistsAdolphe Sax, the inventor of the saxophoneThe saxophone (also referred to as the sax) is a family of woodwind instruments. Saxophones are usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece similar to that of the clarinet.[2] Like the clarinet, saxophones have holes in the instrument which the player closes using a system of key mechanisms
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Line Dancing
A line dance is a choreographed dance with a repeated sequence of steps in which a group of people dance in one or more lines or rows, all facing either each other[citation needed] or in the same direction, and executing the steps at the same time. Unlike circle dancing, line dancers are not in physical contact with each other.Line dancing is a form of dance that takes place with a group of people. Participants line up in rows and execute the same movements in a synchronized manner.[1]Everyone dances alone, side by side, facing the same direction in lines or rows. .... Each dance consists of a sequence of steps that are repeated throughout the music. Although a variety of music may be used, the major emphasis is on country-and-western music.[2]Line dancing involves people standing in lines and performing dance movements together. It consists of patterned foot movements that are usually performed to a number of counts per sequence, and then the sequence is repeated
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Carnival
Carnival
Carnival
(see other spellings and names) is a Western Christian and Greek Orthodox
Greek Orthodox
festive season that occurs before the liturgical season of Lent.[2] The main events typically occur during February or early March, during the period historically known as Shrovetide (or Pre-Lent). Carnival
Carnival
typically involves a public celebration or parade combining some elements of a circus, masks, and a public street party. People wear masks and costumes during many such celebrations, allowing them to lose their everyday individuality and experience a heightened sense of social unity.[3] Excessive consumption of alcohol,[4] meat, and other foods proscribed during Lent
Lent
is extremely common
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Bonga (musician)
José Adelino Barceló de Carvalho (born 5 September 1942 in Kipiri, Angola), better known as Bonga, is a folk and semba singer and songwriter from Angola.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Awards 3 Albums 4 Compilations 5 Live 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] José Adelino Barceló de Carvalho was born in the province of Bengo, and left Angola when he was 23 years old to become an athlete, becoming the Portuguese record holder for the 400 metres (Angola was at the time one of Portugal's five African colonies). He had already begun his singing career at the age of 15. Carvalho abandoned athletics in 1972, concentrating solely on his music, and immediately became famous in his native Angola, as well as in Portugal. After the Carnation Revolution in April 1974, he would become a hit both with immigrants from the ex-Portuguese colonies, and Portuguese of both African and European descent
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World Music
World music
World music
(also called global music or international music[1]) is a musical category encompassing many different styles of music from around the globe, which includes many genres including some forms of Western music represented by folk music, as well as selected forms of ethnic music, indigenous music, neotraditional music, and music where more than one cultural tradition, such as ethnic music and Western popular music, intermingle. World music's inclusive nature and elasticity as a musical category may pose for some obstacles to a universal definition, but its ethic of inter
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