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Musōyama
Musōyama Masashi
Musōyama Masashi
(born February 14, 1972 as Takehito Oso) is a former sumo wrestler from Mito, Ibaraki, Japan. A former amateur champion, he turned professional in January 1993, and he won promotion to the top makuuchi division in just four tournaments. He won thirteen special prizes and spent a total of 31 tournaments at komusubi and sekiwake before finally reaching the second highest rank of ōzeki in 2000, shortly after winning his only top division tournament championship or yūshō. He retired in 2004
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Heya (sumo)
In sumo wrestling, a heya (部屋, lit. "room"; usually translated into English as stable or training quarters[1]) is an organization of sumo wrestlers where they train and live. It can also be termed sumo-beya. All wrestlers in professional sumo must belong to one. There are currently 44 heya (as of 2016),[2] all of which belong to one of six ichimon (groupings of heya). They vary in size, with the largest heya having over thirty wrestlers and smallest just two. Most heya are based in and around the Ryōgoku
Ryōgoku
district of Tokyo, sumo's traditional heartland, although the high price of land has led to some newer heya being built in other parts of Tokyo
Tokyo
or its suburbs. Most heya have a network of scouts, who may be former wrestlers themselves, friends of the head coach, or supporters of the heya, who keep a look out for any powerful or athletic young men and follow the results of local sumo (and judo) competitions
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1996 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 1996.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 March 2.3 May 2.4 July 2.5 September 2.6 November3 Deaths 4 See alsoTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 7 January – 21 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 10 March – 24 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 12 May – 26 May Nagoya
Nagoya
basho, Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, Nagoya, 7 July – 21 July Aki basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 8 September – 22 September Kyushu
Kyushu
basho, Fukuoka International Centre, Kyushu, 9 November – 23 NovemberNews[edit] January[edit] Ozeki
Ozeki
Takanonami
Takanonami
wins his first top division yusho, defeating his yokozuna stablemate Takanohana
Takanohana
in a playoff after both record 14–1 scores
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Kimarite
Kimarite
Kimarite
(決まり手, kimari-te) are winning techniques in a sumo bout. For each bout in a Grand Sumo
Sumo
tournament (or honbasho), a sumo referee, or gyōji, will decide and announce the type of kimarite used by the winner. It is possible (although rare) for the judges to modify this decision later. Records of the kimarite are kept and statistical information on the preferred techniques of different wrestlers can be deduced easily. For example, a pie chart of the kimarite used by each sekitori in the past year can be found on the Japan Sumo
Sumo
Association webpage. Currently the Japan Sumo
Sumo
Association recognises eighty-two types of kimarite, but only about a dozen are used regularly. For example, yorikiri, oshidashi and hatakikomi are frequent methods used to win bouts
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Mawashi
In sumo, a mawashi (廻し) is the belt (loincloth) that the rikishi (or sumo wrestler) wears during training or in competition. Upper ranked professional wrestlers wear a keshō-mawashi (see below) as part of the ring entry ceremony or dohyō-iri.Contents1 Mawashi 2 Keshō-mawashi 3 See also 4 ReferencesMawashi[edit]Hakuhō in silk mawashi worn by sekitori during tournamentsFor top ranked professional rikishi, it is made of silk and comes in a variety of colours. It is approximately 30 feet (9.1 m) in length when unwrapped, about two feet wide and weighs about 8 to 11 lb (3.6 to 5.0 kg). It is wrapped several times around the rikishi and fastened in the back by a large knot. A series of matching colour, stiffened silk fronds, called sagari are inserted into the front of the mawashi. Their number varies from 13 to 25, and is always an odd number
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List Of Years In Sumo
The following is a list of year in sumo articles listed in chronological order from the most recent. Each gives an overview of the happenings in sumo for each year listed
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Tokyo
Tokyo
Tokyo
(/ˈtoʊkioʊ/, Japanese: [toːkʲoː] ( listen)), officially Tokyo Metropolis,[6] is the capital city of Japan
Japan
and one of its 47 prefectures.[7] The Greater Tokyo Area
Greater Tokyo Area
is the most populous metropolitan area in the world.[8] It is the seat of the Emperor of Japan
Japan
and the Japanese government. Tokyo
Tokyo
is in the Kantō region
Kantō region
on the southeastern side of the main island Honshu
Honshu
and includes the Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands.[9] Formerly known as Edo, it has been the de facto seat of government since 1603 when Shōgun
Shōgun
Tokugawa Ieyasu made the city his headquarters
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Osaka
Osaka
Osaka
(大阪市, Ōsaka-shi) (Japanese pronunciation: [oːsaka];  listen (help·info)) is a designated city in the Kansai region of Japan. It is the capital city of Osaka Prefecture
Osaka Prefecture
and the largest component of the Keihanshin
Keihanshin
Metropolitan Area, the second largest metropolitan area in Japan
Japan
and among the largest in the world with over 19 million inhabitants
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Nagoya
Nagoya
Nagoya
(名古屋) is the largest city in the Chūbu region
Chūbu region
of Japan. It is Japan's third-largest incorporated city and the fourth-most-populous urban area. It is located on the Pacific
Pacific
coast on central Honshu. It is the capital of Aichi Prefecture
Aichi Prefecture
and is one of Japan's major ports along with those of Tokyo, Osaka, Kobe, Yokohama, Chiba, and Kitakyushu. It is also the center of Japan's third-largest metropolitan region, known as the Chūkyō Metropolitan Area
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Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Fukuoka
(福岡市, Fukuoka-shi, Japanese: [ɸɯ̥kɯꜜoka]) is the capital city of Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Prefecture, situated on the northern shore of Japanese island Kyushu. It is the most populous city on the island, followed by Kitakyushu. It is the largest city and metropolitan area west of Keihanshin. The city was designated on April 1, 1972, by government ordinance. Greater Fukuoka, with a population of 2.5 million people (2005 census), is part of the heavily industrialized Fukuoka– Kitakyushu
Kitakyushu
zone as well as Northern Kyushu. As of 2015[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
is Japan’s sixth largest city, having passed the population of Kobe.[1] As of July 2011[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
passed the population of Kyoto
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1995 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 1995.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 March 2.3 May 2.4 July 2.5 September 2.6 November3 Deaths 4 See alsoTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 8–22 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 12–26 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 7–21 May Nagoya
Nagoya
basho, Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, Nagoya, 2–16 July Aki basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 10–24 September Kyushu
Kyushu
basho, Fukuoka International Centre, Kyushu, 9–23 NovemberNews[edit] January[edit]In his debut tournament as a yokozuna, Takanohana
Takanohana
wins his eighth makuuchi division championship in a playoff with ozeki Musashimaru after both finish on 13–2. Kaio wins the Outstanding Performance prize in his sekiwake debut
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1997 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 1997.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 March 2.3 May 2.4 June 2.5 July 2.6 September 2.7 November3 Deaths 4 See alsoTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 12 January – 26 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 9 March – 23 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 11 May – 25 May Nagoya
Nagoya
basho, Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, Nagoya, 6 July – 20 July Aki basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 7 September – 21 September Kyushu
Kyushu
basho, Fukuoka International Centre, Kyushu, 9 November – 23 NovemberNews[edit] January[edit]At the Hatsu basho, ozeki Wakanohana wins his third makuuchi division championship with a 14–1 score. His brother, Yokozuna Takanohana returns from a back injury and is runner-up on 13–2
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Kotomitsuki Keiji
Kotomitsuki Keiji
Kotomitsuki Keiji
(born April 11, 1976 as Keiji Tamiya) is a former sumo wrestler from Okazaki City, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. A former amateur champion, he turned professional in 1999. He reached the top makuuchi division in November 2000 and won one yūshō or tournament championship, in September 2001. He was a runner-up in eight other tournaments, and earned thirteen sanshō or special prizes. He is one of five wrestlers in the history of sumo to receive all three sanshō in the same tournament, accomplishing the feat in the November 2000 honbasho. After a record 22 tournaments at sekiwake, he achieved promotion to sumo's second highest rank of ōzeki in July 2007 upon winning 35 out of 45 bouts in three consecutive tournaments. This made him at 31 the oldest man to reach ōzeki in the modern era. He wrestled for Sadogatake stable
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1998 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo in 1998.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 May 2.5 July 2.6 September 2.7 November3 Deaths 4 See alsoTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, January 11 – January 25 Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, March 8 – March 22 Natsu basho, Tokyo, May 10 – May 24 Nagoya
Nagoya
basho, Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, July 5 – July 19 Aki basho, Tokyo, September 13 – September 27 Kyushu
Kyushu
basho, Fukuoka International Center, November 8 – November 22News[edit] January[edit]At the Hatsu tournament in Tokyo, Ozeki
Ozeki
Musashimaru
Musashimaru
wins his third top division championship or yusho, his first since November 1996, with a 12–3 record. He finishes one win ahead of sekiwake Tochiazuma who wins the Outstanding Performance Prize
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1999 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 1999.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 May 2.5 July 2.6 September 2.7 November3 Deaths 4 See alsoTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 10 January – 24 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 14 March – 28 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 9 May – 23 May Nagoya
Nagoya
basho, Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, Nagoya, 9 July – 23 July Aki basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 12 September – 26 September Kyushu
Kyushu
basho, Fukuoka International Centre, Kyushu, 7 November – 21 NovemberNews[edit] January[edit]At the Hatsu basho,the yusho or tournament championship is decided in a final day showdown between Wakanohana, still searching for his first yusho as a yokozuna, and sekiwake Chiyotaikai, who is one win behind him on 12–2
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2000 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2000.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 July 2.7 August 2.8 September 2.9 November3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 9 – 23 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 12 – 26 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 7 – 21 May
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