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Murom
Murom
Murom
(Russian: Муром, IPA: [ˈmurəm]; Old Norse: Moramar) is a historical city in Vladimir Oblast, Russia, which sprawls along the left bank of the Oka River. Population: 116,075 (2010 Census);[7] 126,901 (2002 Census);[10] 124,229 (1989 Census).[11]Contents1 History 2 Administrative and municipal status 3 Sights 4 International relations4.1 Twin towns — Sister cities5 Notable people 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 SourcesHistory[edit] In the 9th century CE, the city marked the easternmost settlement of the East Slavs
East Slavs
in the land of the Finno-Ugric people called Muromians. The Primary Chronicle
Primary Chronicle
mentions it as early as 862.[12] It is thus one of the oldest cities in Russia
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Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky
Sergey Mikhaylovich Prokudin-Gorsky (Russian: Серге́й Миха́йлович Проку́дин-Го́рский,  listen (help·info); August 30 [O.S. August 18] 1863 – September 27, 1944) was a Russian chemist and photographer. He is best known for his pioneering work in color photography of early 20th-century Russia.[1]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Marriage and career in photography 1.3 Later life and death2 Photography
Photography
technique2.1 Three-color principle 2.2 Early practitioners 2.3 Equipment 2.4 Exposures 2.5 Other processes3 Documentary of the Russian Empire 4 Digital color rendering 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Prokudin-Gorsky was born in the ancestral estate of Funikova Gora, in what is now Kirzhachsky District, Vladimir Oblast
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Oleg I Of Chernigov
Oleg Svyatoslavich (Russian: Олег Святославич; c. 1052 – August 1115) was a Rurikid
Rurikid
prince whose equivocal adventures ignited political unrest in Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
at the turn of th
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Types Of Inhabited Localities In Russia
The classification system of the types of inhabited localities in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and some other post-Soviet states has certain peculiarities compared with the classification systems in other countries.[citation needed]Contents1 Modern classification in Russia1.1 Urban localities 1.2 Rural localities2 Historical terms 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksModern classification in Russia[edit] During the Soviet time, each of the republics of the Soviet Union, including the Russian SFSR, had its own legislative documents dealing with classification of inhabited localities.[1] After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the task of developing and maintaining such classification in Russia
Russia
was delegated to the federal subjects.[2] While currently there are certain peculiarities to classifications used in many federal subjects, they are all still largely based on the system used in the RSFSR
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Volga Bulgaria
Volga Bulgaria
Bulgaria
(Tatar: Идел буе Болгар дәүләте, İdel buye Bolğar däwläte, Chuvash: Атӑлҫи Пӑлхар Atălśi Pălhar), or Volga–Kama Bulghar, was a historic Bulgar[1][2][3] state that existed between the 7th and 13th centuries around the confluence of the Volga and Kama rivers, in what is now European Russia.Contents1 History1.1 Origin and creation of the state 1.2 Conversion to Islam
Islam
and further statehood 1.3 Decline2 Demographics 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Origin and creation of the state[edit] Information from first-hand sources on Volga Bulgaria
Bulgaria
is rather sparse
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Baltic Sea
The Baltic Sea
Sea
is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Scandinavia, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, Poland, Germany
Germany
and the North and Central European Plain. The sea stretches from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 10°E to 30°E longitude. A mediterranean sea of the Atlantic, with limited water exchange between the two bodies, the Baltic Sea
Sea
drains through the Danish islands into the Kattegat
Kattegat
by way of the straits of Øresund, the Great Belt, and the Little Belt
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Opera
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov[a 1] (18 March [O.S. 6 March] 1844 – 21 June [O.S. 8 June] 1908)[a 2] was a Russian composer, and a member of the group of composers known as The Five.[a 3] He was a master of orchestration. His best-known orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the symphonic suite Scheherazade—are staples of the classical music repertoire, along with suites and excerpts from some of his 15 operas. Scheherazade
Scheherazade
is an example of his frequent use of fairy tale and folk subjects. Rimsky-Korsakov believed, as did fellow composer Mily Balakirev
Mily Balakirev
and critic Vladimir Stasov, in developing a nationalistic, "Moscalski" style of classical music
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Epic Poetry
An epic poem, epic, epos, or epopee is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.[1] The ancient Indian Mahabharata
Mahabharata
is the longest epic written[2][3]. The Mahabharat is comprised of 100,000 śloka or over 200,000 verse lines (each shloka is a couplet), as well as long prose passages. At about 1.8 million words in total, the Mahābhārata is roughly ten times the length of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey
Odyssey
combined, or about four times the length of the Rāmāyaṇa[4]. Another type of epic poetry is epyllion (plural: epyllia), which is a brief narrative poem with a romantic or mythological theme. The term, which means "little epic", came into use in the nineteenth century
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Administrative Center
An administrative centre is a seat of regional administration or local government, or a county town, or the place where the central administration of a commune is located. In countries which have French as one of their administrative languages (such as Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland or many African countries) and in some other countries (such as Italy, cf. cognate capoluogo), a chef-lieu (French pronunciation: ​[ʃɛfljø], plural form chefs-lieux (literally "chief place" or "head place"), is a town or city that is pre-eminent from an administrative perspective. The ‘f’ in chef-lieu is pronounced, in contrast to chef-d'oeuvre where it is mute.Contents1 Algeria 2 Belgium 3 Luxembourg 4 France 5 Jordan 6 New Caledonia 7 Francophone West Africa 8 Russia 9 Switzerland 10 Tunisia 11 United Kingdom 12 Popular culture 13 See also 14 ReferencesAlgeria[edit] The capital of an Algerian Province is called a chef-lieu
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Monastery
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
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Vladimir II Monomakh
Vladimir II Monomakh
Vladimir II Monomakh
(Old East Slavic: Володимѣръ Мономахъ, Volodimer Monomakh; Christian name: Vasiliy, or Basileios) (1053 – 19 May 1125) reigned as Grand Prince
Grand Prince
of Kievan Rus' from 1113 to 1125.Contents1 Family 2 Reign 3 Marriages and children 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 Further reading 8 External linksFamily[edit] He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) by a relative of Byzantine emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, from whom Vladimir obtained his surname.[1] Contemporary Byzantine naming practice allowed the adoption of a maternal surname if the mother's family was perceived to be of a more exalted origin than that of the father.[2] Reign[edit]The Testament of Vladimir Monomakh to Children, 1125
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Soviet Census (1989)
The 1989 Soviet census (Russian: Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989, "1989 All-Union Census"), conducted between 12-19 January of that year, was the last one that took place in the former USSR. The census found the total population to be 286,730,819 inhabitants.[1] In 1989, the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
ranked as the third most populous in the world, above the United States
United States
(with 248,709,873 inhabitants according to the 1 April 1990 census), although it was well behind China
China
and India.Contents1 Statistics 2 SSR Rankings 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksStatistics[edit] In 1989, about half of the Soviet Union's total population lived in the Russian SFSR, and approximately one-sixth (18%) of them in Ukraine
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Conquest Of Kazan
The Siege of Kazan
Kazan
in 1552 was the final battle of the Russo-Kazan Wars and led to the fall of the Khanate of Kazan. Conflict continued after the fall of Kazan, however, as rebel governments formed in Çalım and Mişätamaq, and a new khan was invited from the Nogais. This guerrilla war lingered until 1556.Contents1 The siege 2 Cultural resonance 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References and notesThe siege[edit] The Russian forces included streltsy as well as Moscow and Qasim irregular feudal cavalry, but the Muscovite artillery and sappers, both Russian and foreigners, played a vital role
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List Of Twin Towns And Sister Cities In Russia
This is a list of places in Russia having standing links to local communities in other countries. In most cases, the association, especially when formalised by local government, is known as "town twinning" (though other terms, such as "partner towns" or "sister cities" are sometimes used instead), and while most of the places included are towns, the list also comprises villages, cities, districts, counties, etc. with similar links
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Twin Towns And Sister Cities
Twin towns or sister cities are a form of legal or social agreement between towns, cities, counties, oblasts, prefectures, provinces, regions, states, and even countries in geographically and politically distinct areas to promote cultural and commercial ties.[1] The modern concept of town twinning, conceived after the Second World War
Second World War
in 1947, was intended to foster friendship and understanding between different cultures and between former foes as an act of peace and reconciliation,[2][3] and to encourage trade and tourism.[1] By the 2000s, town twinning became increasingly used to form strategic in
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