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Munster (cheese)
Muenster (French pronunciation: ​[mœ̃stɛʁ]), Muenster-géromé, or (Alsatian) Menschterkaas, is a strong smelling, soft cheese with a subtle taste, made mainly from milk from the Vosges, between Alsace, Lorraine
Lorraine
and Franche-Comté
Franche-Comté
in France. Muenster is derived from the Alsace
Alsace
town of Muenster, where, among Vosgian abbeys and monasteries, the cheese was conserved and matured in monks' cellars.Contents1 History of the cheese 2 Making and affinage 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory of the cheese[edit] This cheese originated in the Admodiation, an area on the top of the Vosgian mountains of France, named "Chaumes" or "Les grandes Chaumes" (comitatus Calvomontensis)
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Chaource Cheese
Chaource
Chaource
is a French cheese, originally manufactured in the village of Chaource
Chaource
in the Champagne-Ardenne
Champagne-Ardenne
region. Chaource
Chaource
is a cow's milk cheese, cylindrical in shape at around 10 cm in diameter and 6 cm in height, weighing either 250 or 450 g. The central pâte is soft, creamy in colour, and slightly crumbly, and is surrounded by a white Penicillium candidum
Penicillium candidum
rind.Contents1 History 2 Manufacture 3 Style 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The cheese has been made in its namesake village since at least the Middle Ages. Cheese
Cheese
is still manufactured there, ranging from small cheese makers to industrial-scale production further away
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Banon Cheese
Banon is a French cheese made in the region around the town of Banon in Provence, south-east France. Also known as Banon à la feuille, it is an unpasteurized cheese made from goat's milk and is circular in shape, around 7 cm (2.8 in) in diameter and 2.5 cm (0.98 in) in height, and weighing around 100 g. This pungent uncooked, unpressed cheese consists of a fine soft white pâte that is wrapped in chestnut leaves and tied with raffia prior to shipping. The Provençal specialty fromage fort du Mont Ventoux
Mont Ventoux
is made by placing a young banon in an earthenware jar. The cheese is then seasoned with salt and pepper, doused in vinegar and eau-de-vie and left in a cool cellar to ferment
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Cellophane
Cellophane
Cellophane
is a thin, transparent sheet made of regenerated cellulose. Its low permeability to air, oils, greases, bacteria, and water makes it useful for food packaging. "Cellophane" is a generic term in some countries, while in other countries it is a registered trade mark.Contents1 Production 2 History 3 Present day 4 Material properties 5 Branding 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksProduction[edit] Cellulose
Cellulose
is treated with alkali and carbon disulfide to yield viscose. Cellulose
Cellulose
from wood, cotton, hemp, or other sources is dissolved in alkali and carbon disulfide to make a solution called viscose, which is then extruded through a slit into a bath of dilute sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to reconvert the viscose into cellulose
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Vosges Mountains
Gneiss, granite and vulcanite stratigraphic units: about 419–252 mya Bunter sandstone
Bunter sandstone
stratigraphic unit: 252–243 myaType of rock Gneiss, granite, vulcanite, sandstoneTypical landscape of the Vosges
Vosges
(Chajoux valley, La Bresse, France)Waterfall in the eastern VosgesLac de Schiessrothried, a glacial lake in the VosgesThe Vosges
Vosges
(French pronunciation: ​[voʒ] or [voːʒ]; German: Vogesen [voˈɡeːzn̩]), also called the Vosges
Vosges
Mountains, are a range of low mountains in eastern France, near its border with Germany. Together with the Palatine Forest
Palatine Forest
to the north on the German side of the border, they form a single geomorphological unit and low mountain range of around 8,000 km2 (3,100 sq mi) in area
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Lapoutroie
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Lapoutroie
Lapoutroie
(German: Schnierlach; Welche: Lè Peutraille) is a commune in the Haut-Rhin
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Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines
Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines
(German: Markirch) is a commune in the Haut-Rhin
Haut-Rhin
department and Grand Est
Grand Est
region of north-eastern France.Contents1 Geography 2 Localities within the commune 3 Saint Marie-aux-Mines's coats of arms 4 History 5 People 6 Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines
Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines
Mineral Show 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksGeography[edit] Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines
Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines
is located in the massif of the Vosges Mountains, where it occupies the V-shaped valley of the Lièpvrette River (fr)
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Villé
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Villé
Villé
(German: Weiler) is a commune in the Bas-Rhin
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Brined Cheese
Brined cheese, also sometimes referred to as pickled cheese for some varieties, is cheese that is matured in a solution of brine in an airtight or semi-permeable container
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List Of Cheeses
This is a list of cheeses by place of origin. Types of cheese
Types of cheese
are included; brand names are only included if they apply to a distinct variety of cheese. Cheese
Cheese
is a milk-based food that is produced in wide-ranging flavors, textures, and forms. Hundreds of types of cheese from various countries are produced. Their styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal's diet), whether they have been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the bacteria and mold, the processing, and aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses, such as Red Leicester, is normally formed from adding annatto
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Appellation D'origine Contrôlée
The appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC; French pronunciation: ​[a.pɛ.la.sjɔ̃ dɔ.ʁi.ʒin kɔ̃.tʁo.le]; "protected designation of origin") is the French certification granted to certain French geographical indications for wines, cheeses, butters, and other agricultural products, all under the auspices of the government bureau Institut national des appellations d'origine, now called Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité
Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité
(INAO). It is based on the concept of terroir.Contents1 History 2 Enforcement 3 Wine 4 Cheese 5 Meat 6 Lavender 7 Lentils 8 Honey 9 Butter 10 Spirits 11 Other countries11.1 Europe 11.2 Switzerland 11.3 United States 11.4 Canada 11.5 International trade issues12 See also 13 Notes 14 References 15 External linksHistory[edit] The origins of AOC date to the year 1411, when Roquefort was regulated by a parliamentary decree
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Abondance Cheese
Abondance is a semi-hard, fragrant, raw-milk cheese made in the Haute-Savoie
Haute-Savoie
department of France. Its name comes from a small commune also called Abondance. A round of Abondance weighs approximately 10 kg (22 lb), and its aroma is similar to that of Beaufort, also from France. Abondance is made exclusively from milk produced by the Abondance, montbéliarde, and tarine breeds of cattle
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Beaufort Cheese
Beaufort (French pronunciation: ​[bo.fɔʁ]) is a firm, raw cow's milk cheese associated with the gruyère family. An Alpine cheese, it is produced in Beaufortain, Tarentaise valley and Maurienne, which are located in the Savoie
Savoie
region of the French Alps.[1]Contents1 History 2 Varieties 3 AOC Status 4 Preparation and production 5 Taste and texture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]This section is empty. You can help by adding to it
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Bleu D'Auvergne
Bleu d' Auvergne
Auvergne
(French: [blø dovɛʁɲ]) is a French blue cheese, named for its place of origin in the Auvergne
Auvergne
region of south-central France. It is made from cow's milk, and is one of the cheeses granted the Appellation d'origine contrôlée
Appellation d'origine contrôlée
from the French government. Bleu d' Auvergne
Auvergne
is of relatively recent origin, developed in the mid-1850s by a French cheesemaker named Antoine Roussel. Roussel noted that the occurrence of blue molds on his curd resulted in an agreeable taste, and conducted experiments to determine how veins of such mold could be induced. After several failed tests, Roussel discovered that the application of rye bread mold created the veining, and that pricking the curd with a needle provided increased aeration
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Bleu Des Causses
Bleu des Causses
Bleu des Causses
is a French blue cheese made from cow's milk. It is considered a mild variant of Roquefort. The cheese has a fat content of 45% and is aged for 3–6 months in Gorges du Tarn's natural limestone caves
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