HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Municipalities Of Finland
The municipalities (Finnish: kunta; Swedish: kommun) represent the local level of administration in Finland and act as the fundamental, self-governing administrative units of the country. The entire country is incorporated into municipalities and legally, all municipalities are equal, although certain municipalities are called cities or towns (Finnish: kaupunki; Swedish: stad). Municipalities have the right to levy a flat percentual income tax, which is between 16 and 22 percent, and they provide two thirds of public services. Municipalities control many community services, such as schools, health care and the water supply, and local streets. They do not maintain highways, set laws or keep police forces, which are responsibilities of the central government. Municipalities have council-manager government: they are governed by an elected council (kunnanvaltuusto, kommunfullmäktige), which is legally autonomous and answers only to the voters
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Administrative Divisions Of Finland
As of 2017, Finland is divided into: Municipalities (which may also call themselves towns or cities) account for half of public spending. Spending is financed by municipal income tax, state subsidies, and other revenue. As of 2017, there are 311 municipalities, and most were under 5,000 residents. In Finland, state has started the Municipality and Service Structure Reform Program to reform the complex and expensive municipal system, but initiatives have encountered much opposition from local bureaucrats and interest groups. People often identify with their municipality. Government's local administrative duties are performed by the Regional State Administrative Agencies. In addition to municipalities, there are complex other arrangements. Municipalities co-operate in seventy-four sub-regions and twenty regions. These are governed by the member municipalities. The Åland region has a permanent, democratically elected regional council, as a part of the autonomy
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



2012 Finnish Presidential Election

Tarja Halonen
Social Democratic

Elected President
Sauli Niinistö
National Coalition
Presidential elections were held in Finland in January and February 2012. The first round took place on 22 January 2012 with advance voting between 11 and 17 January. Since no candidate received a majority of the vote, a second round was held on 5 February, with advance voting between 25 and 31 January. Sauli Niinistö was elected the President of Finland for a term from 1 March 2012 until 2018.[1][2] All eight political parties represented in Parliament nominated a candidate during the latter half of 2011
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



2015 Finnish Parliamentary Election

Alexander Stubb
National Coalition Elected Prime Minister
Juha Sipilä
Centre Parliamentary elections were held in Finland on 19 April 2015,[1] with advance voting taking place from 8 to 14 April.[2] The 200 members of eduskunta were elected with the proportional D'Hondt method. There were 4,463,333 people entitled to vote in Finland and abroad.[3]

Previous government coalition

The incumbent government was formed by a four party coalition, composed of the National Coalition Party, Social Democratic Party, Swedish People's Party and the Christian Democrats as well as the MP for Åland
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

List Of Political Parties In Finland
This article is a list of political parties in Finland, which includes Finland's national-level political parties and excludes local and provincial parties (such as the parties of Åland). A party is defined as a political association whose existence is recorded in the Ministry of Justice's party register.[1] Finland has a multi-party system. Coalition governments which comprise a majority of seats in the Parliament of Finland are the norm. Those parties which are not in government are called the opposition. Due to the lack of an electoral threshold, many parties are usually represented in Parliament. As a result, it is all but impossible for one party to win a majority. Additionally, the socialist and non-socialist blocs usually cannot win enough seats between them to form a governing coalition on their own
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Supreme Administrative Court Of Finland
The Supreme Administrative Court of Finland (Finnish: korkein hallinto-oikeus, Swedish: högsta förvaltningsdomstolen) is the highest court in the Finnish administrative court system, parallel to the Supreme Court of Finland. Its jurisdiction covers the legality of the decisions of government officials, and its decisions are final. Appeals are made to the Supreme Administrative Court from the decisions of the administrative courts of Helsinki, Turku, Hämeenlinna, Kouvola, Kuopio, Vaasa, Oulu, Rovaniemi and Åland Islands, the Market Court, and the Council of State. In most issues, it is possible to appeal to the Supreme Administrative Court of Finland from the judgment of the administrative court. However, in some case areas of administrative law, an appeal requires a leave of appeal from the Supreme Administrative Court. The most important such area are insurance cases
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Social Democratic Party Of Finland
The Social Democratic Party of Finland (SDP,
Finnish: Suomen sosialidemokraattinen puolue; Swedish: Finlands socialdemokratiska parti), founded as the Finnish Labour Party (Finnish: Suomen työväenpuolue; Swedish: Finska arbetarpartiet), shortened to the Social Democrats (Finnish: Sosiaalidemokraatit; Swedish: Socialdemokrater) and commonly known in Finnish as Demarit (Swedish: Socialdemokraterna),[7] is a social-democratic political party in Finland.[3] The party is currently the largest party in Finland's parliament with 40 seats. Founded in 1899, the SDP is Finland's oldest active political party. The SDP has a close relationship with SAK, the largest trade union confederation
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]