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Multi Media Interface
The Multi Media Interface
Multi Media Interface
(MMI) system is an in-car user interface media system developed by Audi, and was launched at the 2001 Frankfurt Motor Show on the Audi
Audi
Avantissimo concept car.[1] Production MMI was introduced in the second generation Audi A8
Audi A8
D3 in late 2002 and implemented in majority of its latest series of automobiles.Contents1 Concept 2 Functions 3 Generations 4 Cars 5 Criticism 6 Software updates6.1 Version history7 Modular Infotainment Matrix 8 Pseudo-MMI 9 Competing technologies 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksConcept[edit] MMI consists of a single integrated interface, which controls a variety of devices and functions of the car. The system consists of the MMI terminal and the MMI display screen. The central element of the MMI terminal is the control dial
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Audi Tablet
A tablet computer, commonly shortened to tablet, is a portable personal computer, typically with a mobile operating system and LCD touchscreen display processing circuitry, and a rechargeable battery in a single thin, flat package. Tablets, being computers, do what other personal computers do, but lack some I/O capabilities that others have. Modern tablets largely resemble modern smartphones, the only differences being that tablets are relatively larger than smartphones, with screens 7 inches (18 cm) or larger, measured diagonally,[1][2][3][4] and may not support access to a cellular network. The touchscreen display is operated by gestures executed by finger or stylus instead of the mouse, trackpad, and keyboard of larger computers. Portable computers can be classified according to the presence and appearance of physical keyboards
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AES Encryption
Attacks have been published that are computationally faster than a full brute-force attack, though none as of 2013 are computationally feasible.[3] For AES-128, the key can be recovered with a computational complexity of 2126.1 using the biclique attack. For biclique attacks on AES-192 and AES-256, the computational complexities of 2189.7 and 2254.4 respectively apply. Related-key attacks can break AES-192 and AES-256 with complexities 2176 and 299.5 in both time and data, respectively.[4]The Advanced Encryption
Encryption
Standard (AES), also known by its original name Rijndael (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈrɛindaːl]),[5][6] is a specification for the encryption of electronic data established by the U.S
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Tire Pressure Monitoring System
A tire-pressure monitoring system (TPMS) is an electronic system designed to monitor the air pressure inside the pneumatic tires on various types of vehicles. TPMS report real-time tire-pressure information to the driver of the vehicle, either via a gauge, a pictogram display, or a simple low-pressure warning light. TPMS can be divided into two different types – direct (dTPMS) and indirect (iTPMS). TPMS are provided both at an OEM (factory) level as well as an aftermarket solution. The target of a TPMS is avoiding traffic accidents, poor fuel economy, and increased tire wear due to under-inflated tires through early recognition of a hazardous state of the tires.Contents1 History1.1 Initial adoption 1.2 Firestone recall and legal mandates 1.3 Run-flat tires2 Direct vs
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Apple CarPlay
CarPlay
CarPlay
is an Apple standard that enables a car radio or head unit to be a display and also act as a controller for an iPhone
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Android Auto
Android Auto
Android Auto
is a mobile app developed by Google
Google
to mirror features from an Android device (e.g., smartphone) to a car's compatible in-dash information and entertainment head unit. Once an Android device is paired with the head unit, the system mirrors qualified apps from the device to the vehicle's display, with a simple, driver-friendly user interface. Supported apps, include GPS mapping/navigation, music playback, SMS, telephony, and web search. The system supports both touchscreen and button-controlled head unit displays, although hands-free operation through voice commands is encouraged to minimize driving distraction. Android Auto
Android Auto
debuted at Google
Google
I/O 2014, and the app was released on 19 March 2015
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Touchpad
A touchpad or trackpad is a pointing device featuring a tactile sensor, a specialized surface that can translate the motion and position of a user's fingers to a relative position on the operating system that is made output to the screen. Touchpads are a common feature of laptop computers, and are also used as a substitute for a mouse where desk space is scarce. Because they vary in size, they can also be found on personal digital assistants (PDAs) and some portable media players. Wireless touchpads are also available as detached accessories.Contents1 Operation and function 2 History 3 Use in devices 4 Theory of operation 5 Manufacturing 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOperation and function[edit] Touchpads operate in one of several ways, including capacitive sensing and resistive touchscreen
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Driving
Driving
Driving
is the controlled operation and movement of a motorized vehicle with wheels, such as a car, motorcycle, truck, or bus by either a human or computer controller.Contents1 Etymology1.1 Introduction of the automobile2 Colloquialism 3 Driving
Driving
skills3.1 Driving
Driving
as a physical skill 3.2 Driving
Driving
as a mental skill4 Driveability 5 Driving
Driving
laws 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEtymology[edit] Further information: Coachman
Coachman
and Chauffeur The origin of the term driver, as recorded from the 15th century, refers to the occupation of driving working animals, especially pack horses or draft horses. The verb ' to drive ' in origin means "to force to move, to impel by physical force"
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Car Dealership
A car dealership or vehicle local distribution is a business that sells new or used cars at the retail level, based on a dealership contract with an automaker or its sales subsidiary. It employs automobile salespeople to sell their automotive vehicles. It may also provide maintenance services for cars, and employ automotive technicians to stock and sell spare automobile parts and process warranty claims.Contents1 History of car dealerships 2 Multibrand car dealers 3 Auto transport 4 See also4.1 Organizations5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory of car dealerships[edit] The early cars were sold by automakers to customers directly, or through a variety of channels that included mail order, department stores, and traveling representatives. The first dealership in the United States was established in 1898 by William E. Metzger. Direct sales by an automaker to consumers are now limited by most states in the U.S
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2G
2G (or 2-G) is short for second-generation cellular technology. Second-generation 2G cellular networks were commercially launched on the GSM
GSM
standard in Finland
Finland
by Radiolinja (now part of Elisa Oyj) in 1991.[1] Three primary benefits of 2G networks over their predecessors were that phone conversations were digitally encrypted; 2G systems were significantly more efficient on the spectrum enabling far greater wireless penetration levels; and 2G introduced data services for mobile, starting with SMS text messages. 2G technologies enabled the various networks to provide the services such as text messages, picture messages, and MMS (multimedia messages). All text messages sent over 2G are digitally encrypted, allowing the transfer of data in such a way that only the intended receiver can receive and read it. After 2G was launched, the previous mobile wireless network systems were retroactively dubbed 1G
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Firmware
In electronic systems and computing, firmware[a] is a computer program that provides the low-level control for the device's specific hardware. Firmware
Firmware
can either provide a standardized operating environment for the device's more complex software (allowing more hardware-independence), or, for less complex devices, act as the device's complete operating system, performing all control, monitoring and data manipulation functions. Typical examples of devices containing firmware are embedded systems, consumer appliances, computers, computer peripherals, and others. Almost all electronic devices beyond the simplest contain some firmware. Firmware
Firmware
is held in non-volatile memory devices such as ROM, EPROM, or flash memory. Changing the firmware of a device may rarely or never be done during its lifetime; some firmware memory devices are permanently installed and cannot be changed after manufacture
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Flash Memory
Flash memory
Flash memory
is an electronic (solid-state) non-volatile computer storage medium that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed. Toshiba
Toshiba
developed flash memory from E EPROM
EPROM
(electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) in the early 1980s and introduced it to the market in 1984. The two main types of flash memory are named after the NAND and NOR logic gates. The individual flash memory cells exhibit internal characteristics similar to those of the corresponding gates. While EPROMs had to be completely erased before being rewritten, NAND-type flash memory may be written and read in blocks (or pages) which are generally much smaller than the entire device
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Sunroof
An automotive sunroof is a movable (typically glass) panel that is operable to uncover an opening in an automobile roof, which allows light and/or fresh air to enter the passenger compartment. Sunroofs are either manually operated or motor driven, and are available in many shapes, sizes and styles. While the term sunroof is now used generically to describe any glass panel in the roof, the term "moonroof" was historically used to describe stationary glass panes rigidly mounted in the roof panel over the passenger compartment.A sliding sunroof on a Porsche 911 Carrera (Type 991)A sliding glass sunroof on an Acura IntegraHistory[edit] Sunroofs, by historical definition are opaque
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Tegra
Tegra
Tegra
is a system on a chip (SoC) series developed by Nvidia
Nvidia
for mobile devices such as smartphones, personal digital assistants, and mobile Internet devices
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NVidia
Coordinates: 37°22′14.62″N 121°57′49.46″W / 37.3707278°N 121.9637389°W / 37.3707278; -121.9637389 Nvidia
Nvidia
CorporationHeadquarters at Santa Clara in 2008TypePublicTraded asNASDAQ: NVDA NASDAQ-100
NASDAQ-100
Component S&P 500 ComponentIndustrySemiconductors Video games Consumer electronicsFounded April 1993; 25 years ago (1993-04)FounderJensen Huang Chris Malachowsky Curtis PriemHeadquarters Santa Clara, California, U.S.Area servedWorldwideKey people Jensen Huang
Jensen Huang
(President & CEO) Colette M
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Tegra 2
Tegra
Tegra
is a system on a chip (SoC) series developed by Nvidia
Nvidia
for mobile devices such as smartphones, personal digital assistants, and mobile Internet devices
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