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Muirne
Muirne or Muireann Muncháem ("beautiful neck") was the mother of Fionn mac Cumhail
Fionn mac Cumhail
in the Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
of Irish mythology. She had many suitors, but her father, the druid Tadg mac Nuadat, had foreseen that her marriage would lead to the loss of his home on the hill of Almu, so he refused them all. But one of them, Cumhal, leader of the fianna, abducted her. Tadg appealed to the High King, Conn of the Hundred Battles, who outlawed and pursued Cumhal. Cumhal was killed in the Battle of Cnucha, but Muirne was already pregnant, so her father rejected her and told his followers to burn her. Conn prevented this, and sent Muirne into the protection of Fiacal mac Conchinn and his wife, the druidess Bodhmall, who was Cumhal's sister
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Fianna
Fianna
Fianna
(singular fiann) were small, semi-independent warrior bands in Irish mythology. They are featured in the stories of the Fenian Cycle, where they are led by Fionn mac Cumhaill
Fionn mac Cumhaill
(Finn MacCool). They are based on historical bands of aristocratic landless young men in early medieval Ireland.Contents1 Historicity 2 Legendary depiction2.1 War cry and mottos 2.2 Notable fénnid3 Modern use of the term 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistoricity[edit] The historical institution of the fiann is known from references in early medieval Irish law tracts
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Druid
A druid (Welsh: derwydd; Old Irish: druí; Scottish Gaelic: draoidh) was a member of the high-ranking professional class in ancient Celtic cultures. While perhaps best remembered as religious leaders, they were also legal authorities, adjudicators, lorekeepers, medical professionals and political advisors. While the druids are reported to have been literate, they are believed to have been prevented by doctrine from recording their knowledge in written form, thus they left no written accounts of themselves. They are however attested in some detail by their contemporaries from other cultures, such as the Romans and the Greeks. The earliest known references to the druids date to the fourth century BCE and the oldest detailed description comes from Julius Caesar's Commentarii de Bello Gallico
Commentarii de Bello Gallico
(50s BCE)
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High King Of Ireland
The High Kings of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Ard- na hÉireann Irish pronunciation: [ˈa:ɾˠd̪ˠˌɾˠiː n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland. Medieval and early modern Irish literature portrays an almost unbroken sequence of High Kings, ruling from the Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
over a hierarchy of lesser kings, stretching back thousands of years
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Tom Peete Cross
Tom Peete Cross (December 8, 1879 – December 25, 1951) was an American Celticist and folklorist.[1]Contents1 Education and career 2 Works 3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEducation and career[edit] Cross did his undergraduate education at Hampden–Sydney College, receiving his B.A. in 1899. He went on to Harvard University
Harvard University
to pursue an M.A. (1906) and Ph.D. (1909).[2] After receiving his Ph.D., he spent a year studying in Dublin, Ireland, then returned to the United States in 1910 to take up a position as an instructor at Harvard. In 1911 he became the head of the English department at Sweet Briar College.[3] Following that, he spent his next year at the University of North Carolina, and in 1913 became the chair of the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Irish Mythology
The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland
Ireland
did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity. However, much of it was preserved in medieval Irish literature, though it was shorn of its religious meanings. This literature represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. Although many of the manuscripts have not survived and much more material was probably never committed to writing, there is enough remaining to enable the identification of distinct, if overlapping, cycles: the Mythological Cycle, the Ulster
Ulster
Cycle, the Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
and the Historical Cycle. There are also a number of extant mythological texts that do not fit into any of the cycles
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Liath Luachra
Liath Luachra, the "Gray of Luachair", is the name of two characters in the Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
of Irish mythology. Both appear in The Boyhood Deeds of Fionn, which details the young life and adventures of the hero Fionn mac Cumhaill. The first Liath Luachra is one of Fionn's foster mothers who raise him after the death of his father Cumhal at the hands of Goll mac Morna. She is a great warrior and a companion of Fionn's aunt, the druidess Bodhmall; together they raise the boy in secret in the forest of Sliabh Bladhma. Eventually Fionn's ever-spreading fame threatens to bring his father's killers to him, and his caretakers send him to find his own way. By this point they have taught him enough that he can survive on his own, and he goes into the king of Bantry's service. The second Liath Luachra is a tall, hideous warrior and a member of the Fianna
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Muirenn
Muirenn, Gaelic-Irish female given name. Bearers of the name[edit]Muirne, mother of Fionn mac Cumhail Muirenn bean Ragallaig, died 643. Muirenn ingen Cellach Cualann, Queen of Brega, died 748. Muirenn ingen Cellaig, Abbess
Abbess
of Kildare, died 831. Muirenn ingen Suairt, Abbess
Abbess
of Kildare, fl. 909, died 916. Muirenn ingen mic Colmáin, Abbess
Abbess
of Kildare, died 962. Muirenn ingen Congalaig, Abbess
Abbess
of Kildare, died 979.External links[edit]http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Muirenn.shtmlThis page or section lists people that share the same given name
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Bodhmall
Bodhmall or Bodmall is one of Fionn mac Cumhaill's childhood caretakers in the Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
of Irish mythology. She is a druidess and the sister of Fionn's father Cumhal, and both she and her associate Liath Luachra are known as great warriors. Bodhmall's story appears in The Boyhood Deeds of Fionn. When Cumhal is slain by Goll mac Morna, his wife Muirne fears for their son's safety. Bodhmall and Liath Luachra come to her, and take the boy to be raised in the forest of Sliabh Bladhma. There they teach him to hunt, and accompany him on some of his early adventures. When he grows up and news of his exploits spreads, the warrior women fear he will attract the attention of Goll's men. They send him out to find his own way, having taught him all they know. References[edit]MacKillop, James James MacKillop (1998). Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Oxford
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Fenian Cycle
The Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
(/ˈfiːniən/) or the Fiannaíocht (Irish: an Fhiannaíocht[1] ), also referred to as the Ossianic Cycle /ˌɒʃiˈænɪk/ after its narrator Oisín, is a body of prose and verse centring on the exploits of the mythical hero Fionn mac Cumhaill (Old, Middle, Modern Irish: Find, Finn, Fionn) and his warriors the Fianna. These stories tell of tests accomplished by Finn and the Fianna. It is one of the four major cycles of Irish mythology
Irish mythology
along with the Mythological Cycle, the Ulster Cycle, and the Historical Cycle. Put in chronological order, the Fenian cycle is the third cycle, between the Ulster and Historical cycles
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Tadg Mac Nuadat
Tadg, son of Nuada, was a druid and the maternal grandfather of Fionn mac Cumhail in the Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
of Irish mythology. It is unclear whether his father was the short-lived High King Nuada Necht, the god Nuada Airgetlam of the Tuatha Dé Danann, or another figure of a similar name. Nuada Airgetlam is usually the father of Tadg with a mortal woman. He lived on the hill of Almu. Tadg had a daughter, Muirne, who was sought after by many suitors, including Cumhal, leader of the fianna, but he refused them all, having foreseen that his daughter's marriage would result in the loss of his ancestral seat. But Cumhal abducted Muirne, so Tadg appealed to the High King, Conn of the Hundred Battles, who outlawed and pursued him. Cumhal was killed in the Battle of Cnucha at the hand of Goll mac Morna, who took over leadership of the fianna, but Muirne was already pregnant
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Cumhal
Cumhall (earlier Cumall, pronounced roughly "Coo-al" or "Cool") son of Trénmór ("strong-great") is a figure in the Fenian Cycle
Fenian Cycle
of Irish mythology, a leader of the fianna and the father of Fionn mac Cumhaill. Cumhall was a suitor for the hand of Muirne, daughter of the druid Tadg mac Nuadat, future mother of Fionn mac Cumhaill, but Tadg refused him, so he and Muirne eloped. Tadg appealed to the High King, Conn of the Hundred Battles, who made war against Cumhall. Cumhall was killed in the Battle of Cnucha, as recounted in the Middle Irish tale Cath Cnucha, by Goll mac Morna, who took over leadership of the fian, but Muirne was already pregnant with his son, Fionn
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Fionn Mac Cumhail
Fionn mac Cumhaill
Fionn mac Cumhaill
(/ˈfɪn məˈkuːl/ fin mə-KOOL; Irish pronunciation: [ˈfʲin̪ˠ mˠakˠ ˈkuw̃əlːʲ]; Northern Irish: [ˈfʲin̪ˠ mˠakˠ ˈkuw̃əlːʲ]; Western Irish: [ˈfʲiːn̪ˠ mˠakˠ ˈkuw̃əlʲ]; Southern Irish: [ˈfʲuːn̪ˠ mˠakˠ ˈkuːlʲ]; Old Irish language and Middle Irish Find or Finn [1][2] mac Cumail or Umaill, sometimes transcribed in English as MacCool or MacCoul) was a mythical hunter-warrior of Irish mythology, occurring also in the mythologies of Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
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