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Muhammad Ibrahim (justice)
Muhammad[n 1] (Arabic: محمد‎; pronounced [muħammad];[n 2] French: Mahomet /məˈhɒmɪt/; Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)[1] was the founder of Islam.[2][3] According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet and God's messenger, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.[3][4][5][6] He is viewed as the final prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.[n 3]
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Muhammad (name)
Muhammad
Muhammad
(Arabic: محمد‎) is the primary transliteration of the Arabic given name مُحَمَّد‬ that comes from the passive participle of the Arabic verb ḥammada (حَمَّدَ), praise, which comes from the triconsonantal root Ḥ-M-D. The word can therefore be translated as "praised, commendable, laudable".Contents1 Lexicology 2 Transliterations 3 Statistics 4 Given name4.1 Mohamad 4.2 Mohamed 4.3 Mohammad 4.4 Mohammed 4.5 Muhamad 4.6 Muhamed 4.7 Muhammad 4.8 Muhammadu 4.9 Muhammed 4.10 Muhammet5 Surname 6 Derived names 7 See also 8 ReferencesLexicology[edit] The name Muḥammad is the strictest and primary transliteration[citation needed] of the Arabic given name, محمد, that comes from the Arabic passive participle of ḥammada (حَمَّدَ), praise, and further from triconsonantal root Ḥ-M-D (praise); hence praised, or praiseworthy
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Maymunah Bint Al-Harith
Maymunah bint al-Harith al-Hilaliyah (Arabic: ميمونة بنت الحارث الهلالية‎, translit. Maymūnah bint al-Ḥārith al-Hilālīyah) was a wife of Muhammad. Her original name was Barrah, but Muhammad
Muhammad
changed it to Maymuna, meaning "the blessed", as his marriage to her marked the first time in seven years when he could enter his hometown of Mecca.[1]Contents1 Family 2 Marriage to Muhammad 3 Death 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFamily[edit] Her father was al-Harith ibn Hazn from the Hilal tribe in Mecca. Her mother was Hind bint Awf from the Himyar tribe in Yemen. Her full sister was Lubaba the Elder. Her paternal half-sisters were Layla (Lubaba the Younger), Huzayla and Azza
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Maria Al-Qibtiyya
Maria bint Sham'ûn, better known as Maria al-Qibtiyya (Arabic: مارية القبطية‎) (alternatively, "Maria Quptiyah"), or Maria the Copt, (died 637) was an Egyptian Coptic who was gifted to the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
in 628 as a slave by Muqawqis
Muqawqis
the Copt, the Christian ruler of Egypt
Egypt
at the time. She bore him a son, Ibrahim, who died almost five years later in his childhood .[1]Contents1 Year of the deputations 2 Maria in biography of Muhammad 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesYear of the deputations[edit] In the Islamic year 6 AH (627 – 628 CE), Muhammad
Muhammad
is said to have had letters written to the great rulers of the Middle East, proclaiming the new Faith and inviting the rulers to join. Texts of some of the letters are found in Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Jarir al-Tabari's History of the Prophets and Kings
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Children Of Muhammad
The Children of Muhammad
Muhammad
include the three sons and four daughters born to the Islamic Prophet Muhammad.[1] All were born to Muhammad's first wife Khadija bint Khuwaylid[2] except one son, who was born to Maria al-Qibtiyya.[3] The fact that only two of his thirteen wives bore him children has been described as "curious" by Cornell University Professor of Near Eastern Studies David S. Powers.[4] His attitude and treatment towards his children, enshrined in the hadith, is viewed by Muslims as an exemplar to be imitated.[5] All Muhammad's children, except Fatimah, died before him and it is through Fatimah that Muhammad's lineage continued in the form of the respected Sayyid
Sayyid
(meaning lord or sir) and Sharif (meaning noble).[6] His sons never reached adulthood and died as infants
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Aminah
Aminah
Aminah
bint Wahb /ˈæmɪnə/ (Arabic: آمنة بنت وهب‎ [ˈaːmina] ʼĀminah bint Wahb; died 577 AD) was the mother of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1]Contents1 Early life and marriage 2 Birth of Muhammad 3 Inconsistencies in Aminah
Aminah
bint Wahb's biography 4 Fate in the afterlife 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and marriage[edit] Aminah
Aminah
was born to Wahb ibn Abd Manaf
Wahb ibn Abd Manaf
and Barrah bint ‘Abd al ‘Uzzā ibn ‘Uthmān ibn ‘Abd al-Dār in Mecca.[2] She was a member of the Banu Zuhrah clan in the tribe of Quraysh who claimed descent from Ibrahim (Abraham) through his son Ismail (Ishmael). Her ancestor Zuhrah was the elder brother of Qusayy ibn Kilab, who was also an ancestor of 'Abd Allah ibn Abd al Muttalib. Qusayy ibn Kilab became the first Quraysh custodian of the Ka'aba
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Ahl Al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
(Arabic: أهل البيت‎, Persian: اهلِ بیت‎), also Āl al-Bayt, is a phrase meaning, literally, "People of the House" or "Family of the House". Within the Islamic tradition, the term refers to the family of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1] In Shia Islam
Shia Islam
the Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
are central to Islam
Islam
and interpreters of the Quran
Quran
and Sunnah. Shias believe they are successors of Muhammad and consist of Muhammad, Fatimah, Ali, Hasan, and Husayn (known collectively as the Ahl al-Kisa, "people of the mantle") and the Imams the Fourteen Infallibles
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Arabic Name
Arabic
Arabic
names were historically based on a long naming system; most Arabs did not have given/middle/family names, but a full chain of names. This system was mainly in use throughout Arab
Arab
World.Contents1 Name Structure1.1 Ism 1.2 Laqab 1.3 Nasab 1.4 Nisbah 1.5 Kunya2 Muslim Naming Practices 3 Arabophone-Christian Naming Practices 4 Dynastic, or Family, "Al"4.1 Sample Name5 Westernization of Arabic
Arabic
naming practices and names5.1 Common mistakes6 Arab
Arab
family naming convention 7 Arabic
Arabic
names and their biblical equivalent 8 Indexing 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksName Structure[edit] Ism[edit] The ism (اسم), is the given name, first name, or personal name; e.g. "Ahmad" or "Fatimah"
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Ism (name)
Arabic
Arabic
names were historically based on a long naming system; most Arabs did not have given/middle/family names, but a full chain of names. This system was mainly in use throughout Arab
Arab
World.Contents1 Name Structure1.1 Ism 1.2 Laqab 1.3 Nasab 1.4 Nisbah 1.5 Kunya2 Muslim Naming Practices 3 Arabophone-Christian Naming Practices 4 Dynastic, or Family, "Al"4.1 Sample Name5 Westernization of Arabic
Arabic
naming practices and names5.1 Common mistakes6 Arab
Arab
family naming convention 7 Arabic
Arabic
names and their biblical equivalent 8 Indexing 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksName Structure[edit] Ism[edit] The ism (اسم), is the given name, first name, or personal name; e.g. "Ahmad" or "Fatimah"
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Nasab
Arabic
Arabic
names were historically based on a long naming system; most Arabs did not have given/middle/family names, but a full chain of names. This system was mainly in use throughout Arab
Arab
World.Contents1 Name Structure1.1 Ism 1.2 Laqab 1.3 Nasab 1.4 Nisbah 1.5 Kunya2 Muslim Naming Practices 3 Arabophone-Christian Naming Practices 4 Dynastic, or Family, "Al"4.1 Sample Name5 Westernization of Arabic
Arabic
naming practices and names5.1 Common mistakes6 Arab
Arab
family naming convention 7 Arabic
Arabic
names and their biblical equivalent 8 Indexing 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksName Structure[edit] Ism[edit] The ism (اسم), is the given name, first name, or personal name; e.g. "Ahmad" or "Fatimah"
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Hashim Ibn Abd Manaf
Hashim
Hashim
(Arabic: هاشم‎) is a common male Arabic given name, which signifies "Destroyer of Evil” The title Hashim
Hashim
was given to 'Amr al-ʻUlā ibn 'Abd Manaf, as he was generous in providing bread to poor people and travelers going to Mecca
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Rayhana Bint Zayd
Rayhāna bint Zayd (Arabic: ريحانة بنت زيد‎) was a Jewish
Jewish
woman from the Banu Nadir
Banu Nadir
tribe, who is revered by Muslims as one of the Ummahaatu'l-Mu'mineen, or Mothers of the Faithful - the Wives of Muhammad. Rayhana was originally a member of the Banu Nadir
Banu Nadir
tribe who married a man from the Banu Qurayza. After the Banu Qurayza were defeated by the armies of Muhammad in the Siege of the Banu Qurayza neighborhood, Rayhana was among those enslaved, while the men were executed. According to Ibn Ishaq, Muhammad took her as a slave and proposed to her for marriage. She refused telling Muhammad to leave her in his power as it will be easier for both of them. Muhammad then left her and put her aside. She showed repugnance towards Islam
Islam
and clung to Judaism
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Abd Manaf Ibn Qusai
‘Abd Manāf al-Mughirah ibn Quṣai (Arabic: عبد مناف المغيرة بن قصي‎) was a Quraishi and great-great-grandfather of Islamic prophet
Islamic prophet
Muhammad. His father was Quṣai ibn Kilāb.Contents1 Biography 2 History 3 Family 4 Burial 5 Notable descendants 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Abd Manaf was already honoured in his father's lifetime however Qusai preferred his first-born 'Abd ad-Dar and invested him with all his rights, powers, and transferred the ownership of the House of Assembly shortly before his death.[1] After Quṣayy's death Abd Manaf and his brother 'Abd ad-Dar apparently quarreled, and the effects of this conflict continued among their descendants and affected the internal Makkah
Makkah
right up to Muhammad's time. 'Abd ad-Dar was supported by their cousins Makhzum, Sahm, Jumah, their uncle Adi and their families
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