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Muhammad Azam Shah
Abu'l Faaiz Qutb-ud-Din Muhammad Azam (28 June 1653 – 8 June 1707), commonly known as Azam Shah ("King Azam"), was a titular Mughal emperor, who reigned from 14 March 1707 to 8 June 1707. He was the eldest son of the sixth Mughal emperor
Mughal emperor
Aurangzeb
Aurangzeb
(also known as Alamgir) and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. Azam was appointed as the heir-apparent (Shahi Ali Jah) to his father on 12 August 1681.[2] He served as the Viceroy
Viceroy
of Berar Subah, Malwa, Bengal, Gujarat, Deccan, etc. He ascended the Mughal throne in Ahmednagar
Ahmednagar
upon the death of his father on 14 March 1707
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Kamarupa
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[3]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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Dacca
Dhaka
Dhaka
(/ˈdɑːkə/ DAH-kə or /ˈdækə/ DAK-ə; Bengali: ঢাকা, pronounced [ɖʱaka]; formerly anglicized as Dacca)[11] is the capital and largest city of Bangladesh. It is one of the world's largest cities, with a population of 18.89 million people in the Greater Dhaka Area.[12][6][13] It is also the 4th most densely populated city in the world. Dhaka
Dhaka
is the chief economic, political and cultural center of Bangladesh. It is one of the major cities of South Asia, the largest city in Eastern South Asia
South Asia
and among the Bay of Bengal countries; and one of the largest cities among OIC countries. As part of the Bengal plain, the city is bounded by the Buriganga River, Turag River, Dhaleshwari River
Dhaleshwari River
and Shitalakshya River
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Safavid Dynasty
The Safavid dynasty
Safavid dynasty
(/ˈsɑːfəvɪd/; Persian: دودمان صفوی‎ Dudmān e Safavi[24]) was one of the most significant ruling dynasties of Iran, often considered the beginning of modern Iranian history.[25] The Safavid shahs ruled over one of the Gunpowder Empires.[26] They ruled one of the greatest Iranian empires after the 7th-century Muslim conquest of Iran,[27][28][29][30] and established the Twelver
Twelver
school of Shia Islam
Shia Islam
as the official religion of the empire,[31] marking one of the most important turning points in Muslim history. The Safavid dynasty
Safavid dynasty
had its origin in the Safaviyya
Safaviyya
Sufi order, which was established in the city of Ardabil
Ardabil
in the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
region
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Iran
Iran
Iran
(Persian: ایران‎ Irān [ʔiːˈɾɒːn] ( listen)), also known as Persia[10] (/ˈpɜːrʒə/),[11] officially the Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Iran (Persian: جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎ Jomhuri-ye Eslāmi-ye Irān ( listen)),[12] is a sovereign state in Western Asia.[13][14] With over 81 million inhabitants,[6] Iran
Iran
is the world's 18th-most-populous country.[15] Comprising a land area of 1,648,195 km2 (636,372 sq mi), it is the second-largest country in the Middle East
Middle East
and the 17th-largest in the world
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Sultan Muhammad Akbar
Muhammad Akbar (11 September 1657 – 31 March 1706)[1] was a Mughal prince and the youngest son of Emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. He led a rebellion against his father and fled the Deccan after the failure of that venture. He later went into exile to Persia, where he died. He was the father of Nikusiyar, who was Mughal emperor for a few months in 1719.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 The Rajput War 3 Akbar's rebellion 4 Aftermath 5 Legacy 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Muhammad Akbar was born on 11 September 1657 in Aurangabad to Prince rajveer (later known as 'Aurangzeb' upon his accession) and his first wife and chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. His mother was a princess of the prominent Safavid dynasty of Iran (Persia) and was the daughter of Mirza Badi-uz-Zaman Safavi, the Viceroy of Gujarat. Dilras died when Akbar was only one month old
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Niccolao Manucci
Niccolao Manucci (19 April 1638–1717) was an Italian writer and traveller. He worked in the Mughal court. He worked in the service of Dara Shikoh, Shah Alam, Raja Jai Singh and Kirat Singh.Contents1 Storia do Mogor 2 Controversy 3 Works online 4 Further reading 5 See alsoStoria do Mogor[edit] Manucci is famous for his work "Storia do Mogor", an account of Mughal history and life. Manucci had first-hand knowledge of the Mughal court, and the book is considered to be the most detailed account of the Mughal court. It is an important account of the time of the later reign of Shah Jahan and of the reign of Aurangzeb. He wrote about his work: "I must add, that I have not relied on the knowledge of others; and I have spoken nothing which I have not seen or undergone..." . Controversy[edit] Manucci spent almost his entire life in India. He would then send home the manuscript for "Storia do Mogor" which was lent to the French historian François Catrou in 1707
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Zeb-un-Nissa
Zeb-un-Nissa (Persian: زیب النساء مخفی‎)[1] (15 February 1638 – 26 May 1702)[2] was a Mughal princess, the eldest child of Emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. She was also a poet, who wrote under the pseudonym of "Makhfi" (مخفی, "Hidden One"). Imprisoned by her father in the last 20 years of her life at Salimgarh Fort, Delhi, Princess Zeb-un-Nissa is remembered as a poet, and her writings were collected posthumously as Diwan-i-Makhfi.[3]Contents1 Early years1.1 Birth 1.2 Education and accomplishments2 Aurangzeb's accession2.1 Later years, imprisonment and death3 Personal life 4 Legacy 5 Sample translation 6 Works 7 Bibliography 8 References 9 External linksEarly years[edit] Birth[edit] Zeb-un-Nissa ("Ornament of Womankind"),[4] the eldest child of Prince Muhi-ud-Din (the future emperor Aurangzeb), was born on 15 February 1638 in Daulatabad, Deccan, exactly nine months after the marriage of her parents
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Zinat-un-Nissa
Zeenat-un-Nissa (5 October 1643 – 7 May 1721) was a Mughal princess, the second daughter of Emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum. Her father conferred upon her the honorable title of Padshah Begum.[1] Princess Zeenat-un-Nissa is known by historians for her piety and extensive charity.[2]:14,318Contents1 Life 2 Death 3 See also 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Zeenat-un-Nissa ("Jewel among Women") was born on 5 October 1643, probably in Aurangabad to Dilras Banu Begum, Aurangzeb's first wife and chief consort
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Zubdat-un-Nissa
Shahzadi Zubdat-un-Nissa Begum (2 September 1651 – 17 February 1707) was a Mughal princess and the third daughter of Emperor Aurangzeb and his Empress consort Dilras Banu Begum. She married her first cousin, Prince Sipihr Shikoh on 30 January, 1673, he was the third son of her paternal uncle, Crown Prince Dara Shikoh and her aunt Nadira Banu Begum.[1] In 1676, Zubdat gave birth to a son, Shahzada Ali Tabar, who died within six months of his birth.[2] References[edit]^ Sir Jadunath Sarkar (1981). Volume 3 of History of Aurangzib: Mainly Based on Persian Sources. South Asian Publishers. p. 39.  ^ Hansen, Waldemar (1972). The Peacock Throne : The Drama of Mogul India (1. Indian ed., repr. ed.). Motilal Banarsidass. p. 393
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Betrothed
An engagement, betrothal, or fiancer is a promise to wed, and also the period of time between a marriage proposal and a marriage. During this period, a couple is said to be betrothed, intended, affianced, engaged to be married, or simply engaged. Future brides and grooms may be called the betrothed, a wife-to-be or husband-to-be, fiancée or fiancé (from the French word of the same form), respectively. The duration of the courtship varies vastly, and is largely dependent on cultural norms or upon the agreement of the parties involved. Long engagements were once common in formal arranged marriages, and it was not uncommon for parents betrothing children to arrange marriages many years before the engaged couple were old enough
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Shaista Khan
1664 – 1688 as Bengal 1658–1669 as Khandesh(Deccan)Predecessor Mir JumlaSuccessor Ibrahim KhanIssue Bujurg Umid Khan[1] Iran Dukht Rahmat Banu (Bibi Pari)[2]Father Asaf Khan IVMirza Abu Talib, (?–1694) better known as Shaista Khan
Shaista Khan
(Bengali: শায়েস্তা খান) was a subahdar and a general in the Mughal army. A maternal uncle to Emperor Aurangzeb,[3] he served as the Mughal governor of Bengal
Bengal
from 1664 to 1688, and was a key figure during the rule of his nephew. Under Shaista Khan's authority, the city of Dhaka
Dhaka
and Mughal power in the province attained its greatest heights. One of this notable achievements was the Mughal conquest of Chittagong. In the year 1660, he was sent to participate in the struggle against the Maratha
Maratha
king Shivaji. However, he was defeated in a surprise attack and lost one of his sons
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Ahom Kingdom
Assam, Nagaland, Tripura, Manipur, Arunachal Pradesh
Arunachal Pradesh
part of IndiaAhom dynasty1 Sukaphaa 1228–12682 Suteuphaa 1268–12813 Subinphaa 1281–12934 Sukhaangphaa 1293–13325 Sukhrangpha 1332–1364Interregnum 1364–13696 Sutuphaa 1369–1376Interregnum 1376–13807 Tyao Khamti 1380–1389Interregnum 1389–13978 Sudangphaa 1397–14079 Sujangphaa 1407–142210 Suphakphaa 1422–143911 Susenphaa 1439–148812 Suhenphaa
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Peacock Throne
The Peacock Throne was a famous jeweled throne that was the seat of the Mughal emperors of India. It was commissioned in the early 17th century by emperor Shah Jahan and was located in the Diwan-i-Khas (Hall of Private Audiences) in the Red Fort of Delhi. The original throne was subsequently captured and taken as a war trophy in 1739 by the Persian emperor Nadir Shah, and has been lost since
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Sutamla
Sutamla (1648–1663) (Jayadhwaj Singha) (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ জয়ধ্বজ সিংহ) was the 20th king of the Ahom kingdom. During his reign the Mughal viceroy at Bengal Mir Jumla II invaded and occupied his capital Garhgaon as a result of which he had to retreat to the Namrup area, and because of this flight he is also known as the Bhagania Roja in the Buranjis.Contents1 Accession 2 Mir Jumla's invasion 3 Notes 4 ReferencesAccession[edit] Sutamla became the king after his father, the erstwhile king Sutingphaa, was deposed by the Burhagohain.[1] Mir Jumla's invasion[edit] Main article: Mir Jumla's invasion of Assam After the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan fell sick in 1658, the vassal ruler of Koch Bihar, Pran Narayan, threw off the Mughal yoke and took possession of Kamrup and Hajo. The Ahoms, taking advantage of the confusion, pushed west and took control of the region up to the Sankosh river
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First Cousin
Commonly, "cousin" refers to a "first cousin" or equivalently "full cousin", people whose most recent common ancestor is a grandparent.[1] A first cousin used to be known as a cousin-german, though this term is rarely used today.[2] More generally, cousin is a type of familial relationship in which people with a known common ancestor are both two or more generations away from their most recent common ancestor
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