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Mount Meakan
Mount Meakan
Mount Meakan
(雌阿寒岳, Meakan-dake) is an active stratovolcano located in Akan National Park
Akan National Park
in Hokkaidō, Japan. It is the tallest mountain in the Akan Volcanic Complex.[1] The volcano consists of nine overlapping cones that grew out of the Akan caldera, on the shores of Lake Akan. Mount Meakan
Mount Meakan
has a triple crater at its summit. According to its name and local legend, Mount Meakan
Mount Meakan
is the female counterpart to Mount Oakan
Mount Oakan
on the other side of Lake Akan.[1]Akan Caldera Me-Akan (bottom left) O-Akan (center right) Mount Meakan
Mount Meakan
erupting in March 2006Geography[edit] There are two ponds in the crater, 赤沼 (Sekinuma, Red Pond) and 青沼 (Aonuma, Blue Pond). Notes[edit]^ a b Hunt, Paul (1988). "32: Climbing an Active Volcano: Meakan-dake (雌阿寒岳)"
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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List Of Mountain Lists
Perhaps the first of what would become many notable mountain lists around the world was Sir Hugh Munro’s catalog of the Munros, the peaks above 3,000’ in Scotland).[1] Once defined the list became a popular target for what became known as peak bagging, where the adventurous attempted to summit all of the peaks on the list.[2] Over time the peaks on such lists grew more challenging
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National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan
Japan
(国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Types Of Volcanic Eruptions
Several types of volcanic eruptions—during which lava, tephra (ash, lapilli, volcanic bombs and volcanic blocks), and assorted gases are expelled from a volcanic vent or fissure—have been distinguished by volcanologists. These are often named after famous volcanoes where that type of behavior has been observed. Some volcanoes may exhibit only one characteristic type of eruption during a period of activity, while others may display an entire sequence of types all in one eruptive series. There are three different types of eruptions. The most well-observed are magmatic eruptions, which involve the decompression of gas within magma that propels it forward
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Volcanic Belt
A volcanic belt is a large volcanically active region. Other terms are used for smaller areas of activity, such as volcanic fields. Volcanic belts are found above zones of unusually high temperature (700-1400 °C) where magma is created by partial melting of solid material in the Earth's crust and upper mantle. These areas usually form along tectonic plate boundaries at depths of 10–50 km
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Volcanic Arc
A volcanic arc is a chain of volcanoes formed above a subducting plate,[1] positioned in an arc shape as seen from above. Offshore volcanoes form islands, resulting in a volcanic island arc. Generally, volcanic arcs result from the subduction of an oceanic tectonic plate under another tectonic plate, and often parallel an oceanic trench. The oceanic plate is saturated with water, and volatiles such as water drastically lower the melting point of the mantle. As the oceanic plate is subducted, it is subjected to greater and greater pressures with increasing depth. This pressure squeezes water out of the plate and introduces it to the mantle. Here the mantle melts and forms magma at depth under the overriding plate
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Stratovolcano
A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano,[1] is a conical volcano built up by many layers (strata) of hardened lava, tephra, pumice, and volcanic ash. Unlike shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes are characterized by a steep profile and periodic explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions, although some have collapsed craters called calderas. The lava flowing from stratovolcanoes typically cools and hardens before spreading far due to high viscosity. The magma forming this lava is often felsic, having high-to-intermediate levels of silica (as in rhyolite, dacite, or andesite), with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma. Extensive felsic lava flows are uncommon, but have travelled as far as 15 km (9.3 mi).[2] Stratovolcanoes are sometimes called "composite volcanoes" because of their composite layered structure built up from sequential outpourings of eruptive materials
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List Of Mountain Types
Mountains and hills can be characterized in several ways. Some mountains are volcanoes and can be characterized by the type of lava and eruptive history. Other mountains are shaped by glacial processes and can be characterized by their shape
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Holocene
The Holocene
Holocene
( /ˈhɒləˌsiːn, ˈhoʊ-/)[2][3] is the current geological epoch. It began after the Pleistocene[4], approximately 11,650 cal years before present.[5] The Holocene
Holocene
is part of the Quaternary
Quaternary
period. Its name comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
words ὅλος (holos, whole or entire) and καινός (kainos, new), meaning "entirely recent".[6] It has been identified with the current warm period, known as MIS 1, and is considered by some to be an interglacial period. The Holocene
Holocene
encompasses the growth and impacts of the human species worldwide, including all its written history, development of major civilizations, and overall significant transition toward urban living in the present
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Late Pleistocene
The Late Pleistocene
Pleistocene
is a geochronological age of the Pleistocene Epoch and is associated with Upper Pleistocene
Pleistocene
or Tarantian stage Pleistocene
Pleistocene
series rocks. The beginning of the stage is defined by the base of the Eemian interglacial
Eemian interglacial
phase before the final glacial episode of the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
126,000 ± 5,000 years ago. Its end is defined at the end of the Younger Dryas, some 11,700 years ago.[2][3] The age represents the end of the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
epoch and is followed by the Holocene
Holocene
epoch. Much of the Late Pleistocene
Pleistocene
age was dominated by glaciation (the Wisconsin glaciation
Wisconsin glaciation
in North America
North America
and corresponding glacial periods in Eurasia)
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Geologic Time Scale
The geologic time scale (GTS) is a system of chronological dating that relates geological strata (stratigraphy) to time. It is used by geologists, paleontologists, and other Earth
Earth
scientists to describe the timing and relationships of events that have occurred during Earth's history
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Geographical Survey Institute
The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan
Japan
(国土地理院, Kokudo Chiri-in), or GSI, is the national institution responsible for surveying and mapping the national land of Japan. The former name of the organization from 1949 until March 2010 was Geographical Survey Institute.[1] It is an organization attached to the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. Its main offices are situated in Tsukuba
Tsukuba
City of Ibaraki Prefecture. It also runs a museum, situated in Tsukuba, the Science Museum of Map and Survey.Contents1 Earthquake Precursor Prediction Research 2 The GSI in fiction 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEarthquake Precursor Prediction Research[edit] Stationary MT monitoring systems have been installed in Japan
Japan
since April 1996, providing a continuous recording of MT signals at the Mizusawa Geodetic Observatory and the Esashi Station of the GSI
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Topographic Map
In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map
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