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Mortimer His Fall
Mortimer His Fall
Mortimer His Fall
(published 1641) is an unfinished history play by Ben Jonson, about the overthrow of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, who had become de facto ruler of England in 1327 with Isabella of France after deposing and murdering Isabella's husband Edward II of England. The existing text of Mortimer His Fall, was printed in the 1640-1 edition of Jonson's complete works. The text comprises the "argument", or plot summary of the intended five acts, along with the complete first scene and part of the second. The complete scene is a soliloquy by Mortimer in which he is portrayed, "in the 'Machiavel' tradition", as a scheming villain
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Masque
The masque was a form of festive courtly entertainment that flourished in 16th- and early 17th-century Europe, though it was developed earlier in Italy, in forms including the intermedio (a public version of the masque was the pageant). A masque involved music and dancing, singing and acting, within an elaborate stage design, in which the architectural framing and costumes might be designed by a renowned architect, to present a deferential allegory flattering to the patron. Professional actors and musicians were hired for the speaking and singing parts. Often the masquers, who did not speak or sing, were courtiers: the English queen Anne of Denmark
Anne of Denmark
frequently danced with her ladies in masques between 1603 and 1611, and Henry VIII and Charles I of England
Charles I of England
performed in the masques at their courts
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Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl Of March
Roger Mortimer, 3rd Baron Mortimer, 1st Earl of March
Earl of March
(25 April 1287 – 29 November 1330), was an English nobleman and powerful Marcher lord who gained many estates in the Welsh Marches
Welsh Marches
and Ireland following his advantageous marriage to the wealthy heiress Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville. In November 1316, he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1322 for having led the Marcher lords in a revolt against King Edward II in what became known as the Despenser War. He later escaped to France, where he was joined by Edward's queen consort Isabella, whom he took as his mistress. After he and Isabella led a successful invasion and rebellion, Edward was subsequently deposed; Mortimer allegedly arranged his murder at Berkeley Castle
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Isabella Of France
Isabella of France
France
(1295 – 22 August 1358), sometimes described as the She-Wolf of France, was Queen of England as the wife of Edward II, and regent of England from 1326 until 1330. She was the youngest surviving child and only surviving daughter of Philip IV of France
France
and Joan I of Navarre. Queen Isabella was notable at the time for her beauty, diplomatic skills, and intelligence. Isabella arrived in England at the age of 12[2] during a period of growing conflict between the king and the powerful baronial factions. Her new husband was notorious for the patronage he lavished on his favourite, Piers Gaveston, but the queen supported Edward during these early years, forming a working relationship with Piers and using her relationship with the French monarchy to bolster her own authority and power
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Poetaster
Poetaster /poʊɪtæstər/, like rhymester or versifier, is a derogatory term applied to bad or inferior poets. Specifically, poetaster has implications of unwarranted pretentions to artistic value. The word was coined in Latin
Latin
by Erasmus in 1521.[1] It was first used in English by Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson
in his 1600 play Cynthia's Revels;[2] immediately afterwards Jonson chose it as the title of his 1601 play Poetaster
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Philip Henslowe
Philip Henslowe[1] (c. 1550 – 6 January 1616) was an Elizabethan theatrical entrepreneur and impresario. Henslowe's modern reputation rests on the survival of his diary, a primary source for information about the theatrical world of Renaissance London. He was portrayed by actor Geoffrey Rush
Geoffrey Rush
in the Academy Award-winning film Shakespeare in Love.Contents1 Life 2 Business interests2.1 Theatrical interests 2.2 Animal shows3 Henslowe's diary 4 The history of the diary 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Henslowe was born in Lindfield, Sussex, into a family with roots in Devon. His father, Edmund Henslowe, was appointed Master of the Game for Ashdown Forest, Sussex, from 1539 until his death in 1562. Before Edmund Henslowe’s death, his daughter Margaret had married Ralf Hogge, an ironmaster. By the 1570s, Henslowe had moved to London, becoming a member of the Dyers' Company
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William Gifford
William Gifford
William Gifford
(April 1756 – 31 December 1826) was an English critic, editor and poet, famous as a satirist and controversialist.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife[edit] Gifford was born in Ashburton, Devonshire to Edward Gifford and Elizabeth Cain. His father, a glazier and house painter, had run away as a youth with vagabond Bampfylde Moore Carew, and he remained a carouser throughout his life. He died when William was thirteen; his mother died less than a year later. He was left in the care of a godfather who treated him with little consistency. Gifford was sent in turn to work as a plough boy, a ship's boy, student, and cobbler's apprentice. Of these, Gifford cared only for the life of a student, and he continued to write verses as he learned the cobbler's trade. Gifford’s fortunes changed when his first poetical efforts came to the attention of an Ashburton surgeon, William Cookesley
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Edward III Of England
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland
Lord of Ireland
from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign
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Eastward Hoe
East
East
is one of the four cardinal directions or points of the compass. It is the opposite direction from west.Contents1 Etymology 2 Navigation 3 Cultural 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word east comes from Middle English
Middle English
est, from Old English
Old English
ēast, which itself comes from the Proto-Germanic *aus-to- or *austra- "east, toward the sunrise", from Proto-Indo-European *aus- "to shine," or "dawn".[1] This is similar to Old High German
Old High German
*ōstar "to the east", Latin
Latin
aurora "dawn", and Greek ēōs ἠώς.[2] Ēostre, a Germanic goddess of dawn, might have been a personification of both dawn and the cardinal points. Navigation[edit] By convention, the right hand side of a map is east. This convention has developed from the use of a compass, which places north at the top
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History Play
History is one of the three main genres in Western theatre alongside tragedy and comedy, although it originated, in its modern form, thousands of years later than the other primary genres.[1] For this reason, it is often treated as a subset of tragedy.[2] A play in this genre is known as a history play and is based on a historical narrative, often set in the medieval or early modern past. History emerged as a distinct genre from tragedy in Renaissance England.[3] The best known examples of the genre are the history plays written by William Shakespeare, whose plays still serve to define the genre. History plays also appear elsewhere in British and Western literature, such as Thomas Heywood's Edward IV, Schiller's Mary Stuart or the Dutch genre Gijsbrecht van Aemstel.Contents1 Precursors 2 Early Modern Origins 3 Shakespeare 4 Restoration and Eighteenth Century 5 In Contemporary Theatre 6 ReferencesPrecursors[edit]Room 17, the Nereid Monument at the British Museum, London
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The Speeches At Prince Henry's Barriers
The Speeches at Prince Henry's Barriers, sometimes called The Lady of the Lake, is a masque or entertainment written by Ben Jonson in honour of Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, the son and heir of King James I of England. The speeches were performed on 6 January 1610 in conjunction with the ceremony known as Prince Henry's Barriers.Contents1 Barriers 2 Show 3 References 4 External linksBarriers[edit] "Barriers" was a stylized martial combat, conducted on foot with swords and pikes; it was something like a joust without horses. Though ceremonial in nature, the practice had some inherent risk (as jousting did), and the sixteen-year-old Prince Henry had to persuade his reluctant father to allow his participation. The ceremonial challenge that initiated the barriers occurred on 31 December 1609; Prince Henry then kept an "open table" at St. James's Palace, which cost £100 per day
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Oberon, The Faery Prince
Oberon, the Faery
Faery
Prince was a masque written by Ben Jonson, with costumes, sets and stage effects designed by Inigo Jones, and music by Alfonso Ferrabosco and Robert Johnson. Oberon
Oberon
saw the introduction to English Renaissance theatre
English Renaissance theatre
of scenic techniques that became standard for dramatic productions through the coming centuries. The text of the masque was first published in the initial folio collection of Jonson's works that appeared in 1616.Contents1 The show 2 Scenery 3 Costs 4 Influences 5 Modern production 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksThe show[edit] Oberon
Oberon
was performed on 1 January 1611 at Whitehall Palace, in the Banqueting Hall. Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, the son and then-heir of James I, took the title role
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The Masque Of Beauty
The Masque
Masque
of Beauty was a courtly masque composed by Ben Jonson, and performed to inaugurate the refurbished banqueting hall of Whitehall Palace on 10 January 1608. It was a sequel to the preceding Masque
Masque
of Blackness, which had been performed three years earlier, on 6 January 1605. In The Masque
Masque
of Beauty, the "daughters of Niger" of the earlier piece were shown cleansed of the black pigment they had worn on the prior occasion.Contents1 The show 2 Costs 3 Publication 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksThe show[edit] Like its earlier companion piece, The Masque
Masque
of Beauty was performed by Queen Anne and ladies of her court, and witnessed by King James. The number of court ladies included was increased from the twelve in Blackness to sixteen
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The Entertainment At Britain's Burse
The Entertainment at Britain’s Burse is a newly discovered masque (kind of play) written by Ben Jonson in 1609[1] and commissioned by Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, in celebration of the opening of the “New Exchange” (essentially a shopping mall).[2] This masque was discovered by James Knowles and published in 1997.[3] It is an unusual Johnson text because it seems to be in celebration of consumer culture while so many of his other plays and poems condemn it—though there might be some satire intended. There are essentially only three characters. Each character performs a rather lengthy monologue including two songs by the final actor. The masque begins with “The Key Keeper” who welcomes a “Maiestie” and “roiall lady” assumed to be the king (James I) and the queen to the New Exchange. The Key Keeper describes the exchange like a “newe region,” a place still foreign to himself containing many unexplored wonders
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The Hue And Cry After Cupid
The Hue and Cry After Cupid, or A Hue and Cry After Cupid, also Lord Haddington's Masque or The Masque at Lord Haddington's Marriage, or even The Masque With the Nuptial Songs at the Lord Viscount Haddington's Marriage at Court, was a masque performed on Shrove Tuesday night, 9 February 1608, in the Banqueting House at Whitehall Palace. The work was written by Ben Jonson, with costumes, sets, and stage effects designed by Inigo Jones, and with music by Alfonso Ferrabosco — the team of creators responsible for previous and subsequent masques for the Stuart Court.Contents1 The marriage 2 The show 3 The source 4 Publication 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksThe marriage[edit] The masque celebrated the marriage of John, Lord Ramsay, Viscount Haddington, to Lady Elizabeth Radclyffe,[1] the daughter of Robert Radclyffe, Earl of Sussex
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The Masque Of Queens
The Masque
Masque
of Queens, Celebrated From the House of Fame is one of the earlier works in the series of masques that Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson
composed for the House of Stuart
House of Stuart
in the early 17th century
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