HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Morris William Travers
Morris William Travers (24 January 1872 – 25 August 1961) was an English chemist who worked with Sir William Ramsay
William Ramsay
in the discovery of xenon, neon and krypton.[1] His work on several of the rare gases earned him the name Rare gas Travers in scientific circles.[2] He was the founding director of the Indian Institute of Science.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Travers was born in Kensington, London, the son of William Travers MD, FRCS (1838-1906), an early pioneer of aseptic surgical techniques. His mother was Anne Pocock. Travers went to school at Ramsgate, Woking and Blundell's School. Career[edit] He then went to University College, where he began to work with Sir William Ramsay. Travers helped Ramsay to determine the properties of the newly discovered gases argon and helium. They also heated minerals and meteorites in the search for further gases, but found none
[...More...]

"Morris William Travers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fellow Of The Royal Society
Fellowship of the Royal Society
Royal Society
(FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society
Royal Society
judges to
[...More...]

"Fellow Of The Royal Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Proc. Chem. Soc.
The Proceedings of the Chemical Society
Chemical Society
was a scientific journal published at various times in the life of the Chemical Society, a scientific society in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that combined with other societies to form the Royal Society of Chemistry
Chemistry
in 1980. In 1841, the Society published Memoirs of the Chemical Society, renamed in 1842 to Proceedings of the Chemical Society. Together these were volume 1. Volumes 2 and 3 were published as Memoirs and Proceedings, Chemical Society, London between 1843 and 1848. The Proceedings of the Chemical Society, London were published from vol. 1, 1885 to vol. 30, 1914 and from 1950 to 1964
[...More...]

"Proc. Chem. Soc." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
[...More...]

"SNAC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
[...More...]

"Système Universitaire De Documentation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress Control Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Biographical Memoirs Of Fellows Of The Royal Society
The Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
is an academic journal on the history of science published annually by the Royal Society. It publishes obituaries of Fellows of the Royal Society. It was established in 1932 as Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
and obtained its current title in 1955, with volume numbering restarting at 1. Prior to 1932, obituaries were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society. The memoirs are a significant historical record and most include a full bibliography of works by the subjects. The memoirs are often written by a scientist of the next generation, often one of the subject's own former students, or a close colleague. In many cases the author is also a Fellow
[...More...]

"Biographical Memoirs Of Fellows Of The Royal Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata
Jamshedji Nusserwanji Tata (also spelled as Jamsetji) (3 March 1839 – 19 May 1904) was an Indian pioneer industrialist, who founded the Tata Group, India's biggest conglomerate company. He was born to a Parsi
Parsi
Zoroastrian
Zoroastrian
family in Navsari
Navsari
then part of the princely state of Baroda. He founded what would later become the Tata Group
Tata Group
of companies. Tata is regarded as the legendary "Father of Indian Industry".[2]"When you have to give the lead in action, in ideas – a lead which does not fit in with the very climate of opinion – that is true courage, physical or mental or spiritual, call it what you like, and it is this type of courage and vision that Jamsetji Tata showed
[...More...]

"Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
is the scientific discipline involved with compounds composed of atoms, i.e. elements, and molecules, i.e. combinations of atoms: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo during a reaction with other compounds.[1][2] Chemistry
Chemistry
addresses topics such as how atoms and molecules interact via chemical bonds to form new chemical compounds. There are four types of chemical bonds: covalent bonds, in which compounds share one or more electron(s); ionic bonds, in which a compound donates one or more electrons to another compound to produce ions: cations and anions; hydrogen bonds; and Van der Waals force
Van der Waals force
bonds
[...More...]

"Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bangalore
Bangalore
Bangalore
(/bæŋɡəˈlɔːr/), officially known as Bengaluru[15] ([ˈbeŋɡəɭuːɾu] ( listen)), is the capital of the Indian state
Indian state
of Karnataka. It has a population of over ten million,[9] making it a megacity and the third most populous city and fifth most populous urban agglomeration in India.[16] It is located in southern India
India
on the Deccan Plateau. Its elevation is over 900 m (3,000 ft) above sea level, the highest of India's major cities.[17] A succession of South Indian dynasties, the Western Gangas, the Cholas and the Hoysalas, ruled the present region of Bangalore
Bangalore
until in 1537 CE, Kempé Gowdā – a feudal ruler under the Vijayanagara Empire – established a mud fort considered to be the foundation of modern Bangalore
[...More...]

"Bangalore" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fractional Distillation
Fractional distillation
Fractional distillation
is the separation of a mixture into its component parts, or fractions. Chemical compounds are separated by heating them to a temperature at which one or more fractions of the mixture will vaporize. It uses distillation to fractionate. Generally the component parts have boiling points that differ by less than 25 °C from each other under a pressure of one atmosphere
[...More...]

"Fractional Distillation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Blundell's School
Francis (Boys)           Gorton (Girls)           North Close (Girls)           Old house (Boys)           Petergate (Boys)           School (Years 7 and 8) Westlake (U6th)          Colours red & white          Former pupils Old BlundelliansWebsite www.blundells.org Blundell's School
Blundell's School
is a co-educational day and boarding independent school located in the town of Tiverton in the county of Devon, England. It was founded in 1604 under the will of Peter Blundell, one of the richest men in England
England
at the time, and moved to its present site on the outskirts of the town in May 1882
[...More...]

"Blundell's School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.