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Moreby Hall
Moreby Hall
Moreby Hall
is a Grade II*-listed early 19th-century manor house and estate in Stillingfleet, North Yorkshire, England, on the River Ouse. The manor was designed by architect Anthony Salvin for Henry Preston, the Sheriff of Yorkshire, in 1828.Contents1 History 2 Current hall 3 Ownership 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Moreby Hall
Moreby Hall
and its park lies on previously populated village called Moreby or Moorby,[1] the Scandinavian word for "farmstead on the marsh."[2]Moreby Hall, 1907A 1907 profile on Moreby Hall
Moreby Hall
in Country Life magazine states that, "The township anciently contained two carucates of land held of the King in capite by knight's service and a sixpenny rent severally
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Country House
An English country house
English country house
is a large house or mansion in the English countryside. Such houses were often owned by individuals who also owned a town house. This allowed them to spend time in the country and in the city—hence, for these people, the term distinguished between town and country. However, the term also encompasses houses that were, and often still are, the full-time residence for the landed gentry that ruled rural Britain until the Reform Act 1832.[1] Frequently, the formal business of the counties was transacted in these country houses. With large numbers of indoor and outdoor staff, country houses were important as places of employment for many rural communities
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Esholt
Esholt
Esholt
is a village between Shipley and Guiseley, in the metropolitan district of the City of Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. The name "Esholt" indicates that the village was first established in a heavily wooded area of ash trees.[1]Contents1 History 2 Landmarks2.1 Esholt
Esholt
Waste Water Treatment Works3 Sport 4 Transport 5 Popular culture 6 Notable people 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] In the 12th century, the Esholt
Esholt
estate was owned by Syningthwaite Priory, and Esholt
Esholt
Priory, a Cistercian
Cistercian
nunnery dedicated to St Mary and St Leonard was established at Lower Esholt.[2][3] When the nunnery was dissolved in about 1547 the estate was granted to Henry Thompson by Edward VI.[2] In the 17th century Frances Thompson, the heiress of Henry Thompson married Walter Calverley (1629–1694)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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University Of London
The University of London
London
is a collegiate[a] and a federal research university located in London, England
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Charles Eastlake
Charles Locke Eastlake (11 March 1836 – 20 November 1906) was a British architect and furniture designer. Eastlake was born in Plymouth. Trained by the architect Philip Hardwick (1792–1870), he popularized William Morris's notions of decorative arts in the Arts and Crafts style, becoming one of the principal exponents of the revived Early English or Modern Gothic style popular during the nineteenth century. He did not make any furniture; his designs were produced by professional cabinet makers. The style of furniture named after him, Eastlake style, flourished during the later half of the nineteenth century
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Drawing Room
A drawing room is a room in a house where visitors may be entertained. The name is derived from the 16th century terms withdrawing room and withdrawing chamber, which remained in use through the 17th century, and made their first written appearance in 1642.[1] In a large 16th to early 18th century English house, a withdrawing room was a room to which the owner of the house, his wife, or a distinguished guest who was occupying one of the main apartments in the house could "withdraw" for more privacy
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Jacobethan
Jacobethan
Jacobethan
is the style designation coined in 1933 by John Betjeman[1] to describe the mixed national Renaissance revival
Renaissance revival
style that was made popular in England from the late 1820s,[2] which derived most of its inspiration and its repertory from the English Renaissance (1550–1625), with elements of Elizabethan and Jacobean. The "Jacobethan" architectural style is also called "Jacobean Revival". Betjeman's original definition of the style is as follows:The style in which the Gothic predominates may be called, inaccurately enough, Elizabethan, and the style in which the classical predominates over the Gothic, equally inaccurately, may be called Jacobean. To save the time of those who do not wish to distinguish between these periods of architectural uncertainty, I will henceforward use the term "Jacobethan".[3]The term caught on with art historians
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Coffer
A coffer (or coffering) in architecture is a series of sunken panels in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling, soffit or vault.[1] A series of these sunken panels was often used as decoration for a ceiling or a vault, also called caissons ('boxes"), or lacunaria ("spaces, openings"),[2] so that a coffered ceiling can be called a lacunar ceiling: the strength of the structure is in the framework of the coffers.Contents1 History 2 Asian architecture 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 External linksHistory[edit] The stone coffers of the ancient Greeks[3] and Romans[4] are the earliest surviving examples, but a seventh-century BC Etruscan chamber tomb in the necropolis of San Giuliano, which is cut in soft tufa-like stone reproduces a ceiling with beams and cross-beams lying on them, with flat panels filling the lacunae.[5] For centuries, it was thought that wooden coffers were first made by crossing the wooden beams of a ceiling in the
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Slate Industry In Wales
The existence of a slate industry in Wales
Wales
is attested since the Roman period, when slate was used to roof the fort at Segontium, now Caernarfon. The slate industry grew slowly until the early 18th century, then expanded rapidly until the late 19th century, at which time the most important slate producing areas were in northwest Wales, including the Penrhyn Quarry
Penrhyn Quarry
near Bethesda, the Dinorwic Quarry
Dinorwic Quarry
near Llanberis, the Nantlle Valley
Nantlle Valley
quarries, and Blaenau Ffestiniog, where the slate was mined rather than quarried
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Ashlar
Ashlar
Ashlar
is finely dressed (cut, worked) masonry, either an individual stone that has been worked until squared or the masonry built of such stone. It is the finest stone masonry unit, generally cuboid, mentioned by Vitruvius
Vitruvius
as opus isodomum, or less frequently trapezoidal. Precisely cut "on all faces adjacent to those of other stones", ashlar is capable of very thin joints between blocks, and the visible face of the stone may be quarry-faced or feature a variety of treatments: tooled, smoothly polished or rendered with another material for decorative effect.[1][2] One such decorative treatment consists of small grooves achieved by the application of a metal comb
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Nikolaus Pevsner
Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner CBE
CBE
FBA (30 January 1902 – 18 August 1983) was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, and especially that of architecture. Pevsner is best known for his 46-volume series of county-by-county guides, The Buildings of England (1951–74), often simply referred to by his surname.Contents1 Life 2 Second World War 3 Postwar 4 Death 5 Notable ideas and theories 6 Archive 7 Publications 8 Note and references 9 Further reading9.1 Papers10 External linksLife[edit] The son of a Russian-Jewish fur haulier, Nikolaus Pevsner
Nikolaus Pevsner
was born in Leipzig, Saxony
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Jacobean Architecture
The Jacobean style is the second phase of Renaissance architecture
Renaissance architecture
in England, following the Elizabethan
Elizabethan
style. It is named after King James I of England, with whose reign (1603–1625 in England) it is associated. At the start of James' reign there was little stylistic break in architecture, as Elizabethan
Elizabethan
trends continued their development. However his death in 1625 came as a decisive change towards more classical architecture, with Italian influence, was in progress, led by Inigo Jones; the style this began is sometimes called Stuart architecture, or English Baroque
English Baroque
(though the latter term may be regarded as starting later). Courtiers continued to build large prodigy houses, even though James spent less time on summer progresses round his realm than Elizabeth had
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Edward III Of England
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland
Lord of Ireland
from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign
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English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
(officially the English Heritage
English Heritage
Trust) is a registered charity that manages the National Heritage Collection.[3] This comprises over 400 of England's historic buildings, monuments and sites spanning more than 5,000 years of history. Within its portfolio are Stonehenge, Dover Castle, Tintagel Castle
Tintagel Castle
and the best preserved parts of Hadrian's Wall
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