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More Looms
The more looms system was a productivity strategy introduced in the Lancashire
Lancashire
cotton industry, whereby each weaver would manage a greater number of looms. It was an alternative to investing in the more productive Northrop automatic looms in the 1930s. It caused resentment, industrial action and failed to achieve any significant cost savings.Contents1 Traditional weaving 2 Depression 3 More looms
More looms
weaving 4 Implications in the weaving areas 5 World war two and weaving out 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksTraditional weaving[edit] For one hundred years the weaving sheds of Lancashire
Lancashire
had been equipped with cast iron constructed looms not dissimilar to the original Roberts loom, invented by Richard Roberts. They were driven by leather belts from line shafts. They were closely packed together in pairs with a narrow alley
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Productivity
Productivity
Productivity
describes various measures of the efficiency of production. A productivity measure is expressed as the ratio of output to inputs used in a production process, i.e. output per unit of input. Productivity
Productivity
is a crucial factor in production performance of firms and nations
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Pirn
A pirn is a rod onto which weft thread is wound for use in weaving. Unlike a bobbin, it is fixed in place, and the thread is delivered off the end of the pirn rather than from the centre. A typical pirn is made of wood or plastic and is slightly tapered for most of its length, flaring out more sharply at the base, which fits over a pin in the shuttle. Pirns are wound from the base forward in order to ensure snag-free delivery of the thread, unlike bobbins, which are wound evenly from end to end. Pirns became important with the development of the flying shuttle, though they are also used with other end delivery shuttles. Power looms which use pirns generally have automatic changing mechanisms which removes the spent pirn from the shuttle and replaces it with a fresh one, thus allowing for uninterrupted weaving. External links[edit]Examples from a hand-weaving manufacturerLook up pirn in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.This article about textiles is a stub
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Yarn
Yarn
Yarn
is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, or ropemaking.[1] Thread is a type of yarn intended for sewing by hand or machine
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Textile
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
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Satin Weave
Satin[1] is a weave that typically has a glossy surface and a dull back. The satin weave is characterized by four or more fill or weft yarns floating over a warp yarn or vice versa, four warp yarns floating over a single weft yarn. Floats are missed interfacings, where the warp yarn lies on top of the weft in a warp-faced satin and where the weft yarn lies on top of the warp yarns in weft-faced satins. These floats explain the even sheen, as unlike in other weaves, the light reflecting is not scattered as much by the fibres, which have fewer tucks
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Lampas
Lampas
Lampas
is a type of luxury fabric with a background weft (a "ground weave") typically in taffeta with supplementary wefts (the "pattern wefts") laid on top and forming a design, sometimes also with a "brocading weft". Lampas
Lampas
is typically woven in silk, and often has gold and silver thread enrichment. History[edit] Lampas
Lampas
weaves were developed around 1000 CE. Beginning late in the 17th century western lampas production began centered in Lyon, France, where an industry of providing for French and other European courts became centered. Gallery[edit] Lampas
Lampas
textile in silk and gold, Iraq, 14th century, Musée de Cluny Silk
Silk
furnishing fabric, lampas weave, Italy, late 17th-early 18th century, Honolulu Museum of ArtMan’s bizarre silk sleeved waistcoat, France, c. 1715
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Lancashire Cotton Industry
Textile
Textile
manufacture during the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
in Britain was centred in south Lancashire
Lancashire
and the towns on both sides of the Pennines. In Germany it was concentrated in the Wupper
Wupper
Valley, Ruhr Region and Upper Silesia, while in the United States
United States
it was in New England. The four key drivers of the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
were textile manufacturing, iron founding, steam power and cheap labour. Before the 18th century, the manufacture of cloth was performed by individual workers, in the premises in which they lived and goods were transported around the country by packhorses or by river navigations and contour-following canals that had been constructed in the early 18th century. In the mid-18th century, artisans were inventing ways to become more productive
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Barnoldswick
Barnoldswick
Barnoldswick
/bɑːrˈnɒldzwɪk/ (colloquially known as Barlick) is a town and civil parish in Lancashire, England. Near the county border with North Yorkshire, it is just outside the Yorkshire Dales National Park and the Forest of Bowland
Forest of Bowland
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The town is built in the shadow of Weets Hill, and Stock Beck, a tributary of the River Ribble, runs through the town
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Rolls-Royce Limited
Rolls-Royce Limited
Rolls-Royce Limited
owned a British luxury car and aero engine manufacturing business founded in 1904 by Charles Stewart Rolls
Charles Stewart Rolls
and Frederick Henry Royce. Rolls-Royce Limited
Rolls-Royce Limited
was incorporated on 15 March 1906 as a vehicle for their ownership of their Rolls-Royce business. Their business quickly developed a reputation for superior engineering quality and for manufacturing the "best car in the world", building on F H Royce's existing standing
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Rover (marque)
Rover is a British automotive marque used between 1904 and 2005. It was launched as a bicycle maker called Rover Company
Rover Company
in 1878, before manufacturing cars in 1904. The brand used the iconic Viking longship as its logo. Despite a state-controlled absorption by the Leyland Motor Corporation (LMC) in 1967 and subsequent mergers, nationalisation, and de-mergers, the Rover marque retained its identity first as an independent subsidiary division of LMC, then through variously named groups of British Leyland
British Leyland
through the 1970s and into the 1980s. The Rover marque became the primary brand of the then newly renamed Rover Group
Rover Group
in 1988 as it passed first through the hands of British Aerospace and into the ownership of BMW
BMW
Group
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Calico (textile)
Calico
Calico
(in British usage since 1505[1]) is a plain-woven textile made from unbleached and often not fully processed cotton. It may contain unseparated husk parts, for example. The fabric is far less fine than muslin, but less coarse and thick than canvas or denim, but it is still very cheap owing to its unfinished and undyed appearance. The fabric was originally from the city of Calicut
Calicut
in southwestern India. It was made by the traditional weavers called cāliyans
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Industrial Action
Industrial action
Industrial action
(Europe, India, South Africa and Australia) or job action (Canada and US) refers collectively to any measure taken by trade unions or other organised labour, most times when they are forced out of work due to contract termination and no agreement being reached, meant to reduce productivity in a workplace. Quite often it is used and interpreted as a euphemism for strike or mass strike, but the scope is much wider. Industrial action
Industrial action
may take place in the context of a labour dispute or may be meant to effect political or social change. This form of communication tends to be a workers only means to voice their concerns for safety and benefits
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Line Shaft
A line shaft is a power driven rotating shaft for power transmission that was used extensively from the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
until the early 20th century. Prior to the widespread use of electric motors small enough to be connected directly to each piece of machinery, line shafting was used to distribute power from a large central power source to machinery throughout a workshop or an industrial complex. The central power source could be a water wheel, turbine, windmill, animal power or a steam engine. Power was distributed from the shaft to the machinery by a system of belts, pulleys and gears known as millwork.[1]Contents1 Operation 2 History 3 Disadvantages and alternatives3.1 Disadvantages 3.2 Historical alternatives to line shafts4 Early examples4.1 Original systems 4.2 Reconstructed or demonstration systems5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOperation[edit]Variable speed belt drive for a lathe
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