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Monviso
Monte Viso
Monte Viso
or Monviso (Italian pronunciation: [momˈviːzo]; Occitan: Vísol; Piedmontese: Brich Monviso or Viso), is the highest mountain of the Cottian Alps. It is located in Italy
Italy
close to the French border. Monte Viso
Monte Viso
is well known for its pyramid-like shape and, because it is higher than all its neighbouring peaks by about 500 m, it can be seen from great distance, including from the Piedmontese plateau, the Langhe, the Theodulpass in the Zermatt ski area and the summits of the Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
massif
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
(/ˈtʃɔːsər/; c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature,[1] is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages. He was the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner
Poets' Corner
of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten-year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works are The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Legend of Good Women and Troilus
Troilus
and Criseyde
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Guil
The Guil
Guil
(French: le Guil) is a 51.6-kilometre (32.1 mi) long river in the Hautes-Alpes
Hautes-Alpes
département, southeastern France. Its source is several small streams which converge into the lake Lestio, at Ristolas. It flows generally west, through the Queyras. It is a left tributary of the Durance
Durance
into which it flows at Guillestre. Communes along its course[edit] This list is ordered from source to mouth: Ristolas, Abriès, Aiguilles, Château-Ville-Vieille, Arvieux, Eygliers, Guillestre Notes[edit]This article is based on the equivalent article from the French Wikipedia, consulted on 23 April 2009.References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Guil.http://www.geoportail.fr The Guil
Guil
at the Sandre databaseThis Hautes-Alpes
Hautes-Alpes
geographical article is a stub
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Western Alps
The Western Alps
Alps
are the western part of the Alpine range including the southeastern part of France
France
(i.e. Savoie), the whole of Monaco, the northwestern part of Italy
Italy
and the southwestern part of Switzerland
Switzerland
(i.e. Valais). In the southeast the range is bounded by the Italian Padan Plain. In the west, the valley of the Rhone
Rhone
river separates it from the Massif Central
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SOIUSA Code
SOIUSA
SOIUSA
code is the code used in the International Standardized Mountain
Mountain
Subdivision of the Alps
Alps
(ISMSA or SOIUSA), a proposal by Italian Alpinist, Sergio Marazzi, to re-categorize the mountains and mountain ranges of the Alps. The proposal has been aired since 2005 but has yet to receive official recognition.Contents1 SOIUSA
SOIUSA
groups' hierarchy 2 Encoding 3 Encoding example 4 References SOIUSA
SOIUSA
groups' hierarchy[edit] SOIUSA
SOIUSA
pyramid showing its groups' hierarchy. SOIUSA
SOIUSA
divides the Alps
Alps
in two main regions, the Western Alps
Alps
and Eastern Alps
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Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
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Jadeite
Jadeite
Jadeite
is a pyroxene mineral with composition NaAlSi2O6. It is monoclinic. It has a Mohs hardness
Mohs hardness
of about 6.5 to 7.0 depending on the composition. The mineral is dense, with a specific gravity of about 3.4.Contents1 Name 2 Chemistry 3 Colors 4 Stone Age use 5 Jade 6 See also 7 ReferencesName[edit] The name jadeite is derived (via French: l'ejade and Latin: ilia[5]) from the Spanish phrase "piedra de ijada" which means "stone of the side". The Latin
Latin
version of the name, lapis nephriticus, is the origin of the term nephrite, which is also a variety of jade. Chemistry[edit] Jadeite
Jadeite
forms solid solutions with other pyroxene endmembers such as augite and diopside (CaMg-rich endmembers), aegirine (NaFe endmember), and kosmochlor (NaCr endmember). Pyroxenes rich in both the jadeite and augite endmembers are known as omphacite
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Axe
An axe (British English) or ax (American English; see spelling differences) is an implement that has been used for millennia to shape, split and cut wood; to harvest timber; as a weapon; and as a ceremonial or heraldic symbol. The axe has many forms and specialised uses but generally consists of an axe head with a handle, or helve. Before the modern axe, the stone-age hand axe was used from 1.5 million years BP without a handle. It was later fastened to a wooden handle. The earliest examples of handled axes have heads of stone with some form of wooden handle attached (hafted) in a method to suit the available materials and use. Axes made of copper, bronze, iron and steel appeared as these technologies developed. Axes are usually composed of a head and a handle. The axe is an example of a simple machine, as it is a type of wedge, or dual inclined plane. This reduces the effort needed by the wood chopper. It splits the wood into two parts by the pressure concentration at the blade
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Dante
Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri
(Italian: [duˈrante deʎʎ aliˈɡjɛːri]), simply called Dante (Italian: [ˈdante], UK: /ˈdænti/, US: /ˈdɑːnteɪ/; c. 1265 – 1321), was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages/Early Renaissance. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa (modern Italian: Commedia) and later christened Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.[1][2] In the late Middle Ages, most poetry was written in Latin, accessible only to the most educated readers. In De vulgari eloquentia
De vulgari eloquentia
(On Eloquence in the Vernacular), however, Dante defended use of the vernacular in literature
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Petrarch
Francesco Petrarca (Italian: [franˈtʃesko peˈtrarka]; July 20, 1304 – July 20, 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch (/ˈpiːtrɑːrk, ˈpɛ-/), was an Italian scholar and poet in Renaissance
Renaissance
Italy, who was one of the earliest humanists. His rediscovery of Cicero's letters is often credited with initiating the 14th-century Renaissance
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Simile
A simile (/ˈsɪməli/) is a figure of speech that directly compares two things.[1][2] Although similes and metaphors are similar, similes explicitly use connecting words (such as like, as, so, than, or various verbs such as resemble),[1] though these specific words are not always necessary.[3] While similes are mainly used in forms of poetry that compare the inanimate and the living, there are also terms in which similes and personifications are used for humorous purposes and comparison.Contents1 Uses1.1 In literature 1.2 In comedy2 In languages other than English2.1 Arabic 2.2 Vietnamese3 See also 4 ReferencesUses[edit] In literature[edit]"O My Luve's like a red, red rose." "A Red, Red Rose," by Robert Burns.[1][4] John Milton, Paradise Lost, a Homeric simile:[5]As when a prowling Wolf, Whom hunger drives to seek new haunt for prey, Watching where Shepherds pen thir Flocks at eve In hurdl'd Cotes amid the field secure, Le
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Headwaters
The source or headwaters of a river or stream is the furthest place in that river or stream from its estuary or confluence with another river, as measured along the course of the river.Contents1 Definition 2 Characteristics of sources2.1 Example3 Related usages 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit]The marker indicating the source of the Po River, near Crissolo. "Here is born the Po"The United States Geological Survey
United States Geological Survey
(USGS) states that a river's "length may be considered to be the distance from the mouth to the most distant headwater source (irrespective of stream name), or from the mouth to the headwaters of the stream commonly known as the source stream". As an example of the second definition above, the USGS at times considers the Missouri River
River
as a tributary of the Mississippi River
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Inferno (Dante)
Inferno (pronounced [imˈfɛrno]; Italian for "Hell") is the first part of Dante Alighieri's 14th-century epic poem Divine Comedy. It is followed by Purgatorio
Purgatorio
and Paradiso. The Inferno tells the journey of Dante through Hell, guided by the ancient Roman poet Virgil. In the poem, Hell is depicted as nine concentric circles of torment located within the Earth; it is the "realm ..
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Montone
Montone
Montone
is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Perugia
Province of Perugia
in the Italian region Umbria, located about 35 km north of Perugia. Montone
Montone
is a walled medieval village with a small industrial and housing estate surrounding the walled town center. The town is the origin of the Fortebracci condottieri family, whose most famous member was Braccio da Montone. History[edit] Believed to be of Medieval origins, Montone
Montone
appears in the tenth century as a fiefdom of the Margravate of Colle and subsequently of the Del Monte family. By 1121 Montone, now under the direct control of Perugia, was authorized to be self-governing under its own statutes and legal officers. In 1414 it was given to Braccio da Montone. His family held it until the early 16th century, when the Vitelli acquired it
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Clerk's Tale
The Clerk's Tale
The Clerk's Tale
is the first tale of Group E (Fragment IV) in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. It is preceded by The Summoner's Tale and followed by The Merchant's Tale. The Clerk of Oxenford (modern Oxford) is a student of what would nowadays be considered philosophy or theology. He tells the tale of Griselda, a young woman whose husband tests her loyalty in a series of cruel torments that recall the Biblical book of Job.Contents1 Plot 2 Prologue 3 Sources 4 Chaucer's intentions 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 External linksPlot[edit] The Clerk's tale is about a marquis of Saluzzo
Saluzzo
in Piedmont
Piedmont
in Italy named Walter, a bachelor who is asked by his subjects to marry to provide an heir. He assents and decides he will marry a peasant, named Griselda
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