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Montargis
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Floorplan of the Château de Montargis Montargis
Montargis
(French pronunciation: ​[mɔ̃taʁʒi]) is a commune in the Loiret
Loiret
department in north-central France
France
on the Loing
Loing
river. The town is located about 110 km (68 mi) south of Paris
Paris
and 70 km (43 mi) east of Orléans
Orléans
in the Gâtinais. Montargis
Montargis
is the second largest city in the Loiret, after Orléans. It is near a large forest, and contains light industry and farming, including saffron
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Subprefectures In France
In France, a subprefecture (French: sous-préfecture) is the administrative center of a departmental arrondissement that does not contain the prefecture for its department. The term also applies to the building that houses the administrative headquarters for an arrondissement. The civil servant in charge of a subprefecture is the subprefect, assisted by a general secretary
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Jean De Dunois
Jean de Dunois
Jean de Dunois
(23 November 1402 – 24 November 1468), also called John of Orléans and Jean de Duno (Jean d'Orléans), was the illegitimate son of Louis I, Duke of Orléans, by Mariette d'Enghien.[1] His nickname, the "Bastard of Orléans" (bâtard d'Orléans), was a term of respect, since it acknowledged him as a first cousin to the king and acting head of a cadet branch of the royal family during his half-brother's captivity
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Juno (mythology)
Juno (Latin: IVNO, Iūnō [ˈjuːnoː]) is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. A daughter of Saturn, she is the wife of Jupiter and the mother of Mars, Vulcan, Bellona and Juventas. She is the Roman equivalent of Hera, queen of the gods in Greek mythology; like Hera, her sacred animal was the peacock.[1] Her Etruscan counterpart was Uni, and she was said to also watch over the women of Rome.[2] As the patron goddess of Rome
Rome
and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and was a member of the Capitoline Triad
Capitoline Triad
(Juno Capitolina), centered on the Capitoline Hill
Capitoline Hill
in Rome; it consisted of her, Jupiter, and Minerva, goddess of wisdom. Juno's own warlike aspect among the Romans is apparent in her attire. She is often shown armed and wearing a goatskin cloak
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Argus Panoptes
Argus Panoptes
Argus Panoptes
(Greek: Άργος Πανόπτης) (or Argos
Argos
(Greek: Άργος)) is a many-eyed giant in Greek mythology. The figure is known for having spawned the saying "the eyes of Argus", as in to be "followed by", "trailed by", "watched by", et cetera the eyes; the saying is used to describe being subject to strict scrutiny in one's actions to an invasive, distressing degree
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Julius Caesar
Gaius Julius Caesar[a] (/ˈsiːzər/; 12 or 13 July 100 BC[1] – 15 March 44 BC),[2] usually called Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the rise of the Roman Empire. He is also known as a notable author of Latin
Latin
prose. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus
Crassus
and Pompey
Pompey
formed a political alliance that dominated Roman politics
Roman politics
for several years. Their attempts to amass power as Populares were opposed by the Optimates within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger
Cato the Younger
with the frequent support of Cicero
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Gallic Wars
300,000+ fighting men (mainly irregulars)Casualties and losses30,000+ killed, 10,000+ woundedAbout 1,000,000 according to Caesar which mainly includes civilians killed. Modern estimates are significantly lower, but still in several hundreds of thousandsv t eGallic WarsMagetobriga (63 BC) Arar (58 BC) Bibracte
Bibracte
(58 BC) Vosges (58 BC) Axona (57 BC) Sabis (57 BC) Atuatuci (57 BC) Octodurus (57–56 BC) Ambiorix's revolt
Ambiorix's revolt
(54–53 BC) Avaricum
Avaricum
(52 BC) Gergovia
Gergovia
(52 BC) Lutetia (52 BC) Alesia (52 BC) Uxellodunum (51 BC)The Gallic Wars
Gallic Wars
were a series of military campaigns waged by the Roman proconsul Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
against several Gallic tribes
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Gallo-Roman
The term Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
describes the Romanized culture of Gaul
Gaul
under the rule of the Roman Empire
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Franks
The Franks
Franks
(Latin: Franci or Latin: gens Francorum) were a collection of Germanic peoples, whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources, associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine
Middle Rhine
in the 3rd century AD, on the edge of the Roman Empire. Later the term is associated with Romanized Germanic dynasties within the collapsing Roman Empire, who eventually commanded the whole region between the rivers Loire
Loire
and Rhine, and imposed power over many other post-Roman kingdoms and Germanic peoples, later being recognized by the Catholic church as successors to the old rulers of the Western Roman Empire.[1][2][3][a] Although the Frankish name only appears in the 3rd century, at least some of the original Frankish tribes had long been known under their own names to the Romans, both as allies providing soldiers, and as enemies
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Clovis I
Clovis (Latin: Chlodovechus; reconstructed Frankish: *Hlōdowig;[1] c. 466 – 27 November 511)[2] was the first king of the Franks to unite all of the Frankish tribes under one ruler, changing the form of leadership from a group of royal chieftains to rule by a single king and ensuring that the kingship was passed down to his heirs.[3] He is considered to have been the founder of the Merovingian
Merovingian
dynasty, which ruled the Frankish kingdom for the next two centuries. Clovis was the son of Childeric I, a Merovingian
Merovingian
king of the Salian Franks, and Basina, a Thuringian princess. In 481, at the age of fifteen,[4] Clovis succeeded his father
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Hundred Years' War
House of Valois Kingdom of France Duchy of Burgundy[1] Duchy of Brittany[2] (County of Flanders)*[3] Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of Bohemia Duchy of Lorraine Republic of Genoa Crown of Castile Crown of Aragon Kingdom of Majorca Avignon Papacy[4] House of Plantagenet Kingdom of England Principality of Wales Duchy of Aquitaine English Kingdom of France[5] Duchy of Burgundy County of Flanders County of Hainaut Duchy of Brittany[6] Kingdom of Portugal Kingdom of Navarre Papal States[7]Commanders and leaders Philip VI (1337–1350) John II (1350–1364) Charles V (1364–1380) Charles VI (1380–1422) Charles VII (1422–1453) Edward III
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Richard De Beauchamp, 13th Earl Of Warwick
Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, Count of Aumale, KG (25 or 28 January 1382[1] – 30 April 1439) was an English medieval nobleman and military commander.Contents1 Early life 2 Welsh Rebellion 3 Chivalry and Pilgrimage 4 Soldier of the King 5 Responsibilities 6 Marriages and children 7 Death and Burial 8 Ancestors 9 Notes 10 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Beauchamp was born at Salwarpe
Salwarpe
Court[2] in Salwarpe, Worcestershire, the son of Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th
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Joan Of Arc
Hundred Years War Loire
Loire
Campaign:Siege of Orléans Battle
Battle
of Jargeau Battle
Battle
of Meung-sur-Loire Battle
Battle
of Beaugency Battle
Battle
of PatayMarch to Reims Siege of Paris Siege of La Charité Siege of CompiègneSignature Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
(French: Jeanne d'Arc,[5] IPA: [ʒan daʁk]; 6 January c. 1412[6] – 30 May 1431), nicknamed "The Maid of Orléans" (French: La Pucelle d'Orléans), is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years' War and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint. Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
was born to Jacques d'Arc
Jacques d'Arc
and Isabelle Romée, a peasant family, at Domrémy in north-east France
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Light Industry
Light industry
Light industry
is industry that is usually less capital-intensive than heavy industry, and is more consumer-oriented than business-oriented (i.e., most light industry products are produced for end users rather than as intermediates for use by other industries). Light industry facilities typically have less environmental impact than those associated with heavy industry, and zoning laws are more likely to permit light industry near residential areas. It is the production of small consumer goods.[1] One economic definition states that light industry is a "manufacturing activity that uses moderate amounts of partially processed materials to produce items of relatively high value per unit weight". Examples of light industries include the manufacturing of foods, beverages, personal care and home care products, cosmetics, drugs, clothes & shoes, furniture, art ware & crafts, consumer electronics and home appliances
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Charles VII Of France
Charles VII (22 February 1403 – 22 July 1461), called the Victorious (French: le Victorieux)[1] or the Well-Served (French: le Bien-Servi), was a monarch of the House of Valois
House of Valois
who ruled as King of France
King of France
from 1422 to his death in 1461. In the midst of the Hundred Years' War, Charles VII inherited the throne of France
France
under desperate circumstances. Forces of the Kingdom of England and the Duchy of Burgundy
Duchy of Burgundy
occupied Guyenne
Guyenne
and northern France, including Paris, the most populous city, and Reims, the city in which the French kings were traditionally crowned. In addition, his father Charles VI had disinherited him in 1420 and recognized Henry V of England and his heirs as the legitimate successors to the French crown instead
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Charles VIII Of France
Charles VIII, called the Affable, French: l'Affable (30 June 1470 – 7 April 1498), was a monarch of the House of Valois
House of Valois
who ruled as King of France
France
from 1483 to his death in 1498. He succeeded his father Louis XI
Louis XI
at the age of 13.[1] His elder sister Anne of France
Anne of France
acted as regent jointly with her husband Peter II, Duke of Bourbon[1][2] until 1491 when the young king turned 21 years of age. During Anne's regency, the great lords rebelled against royal centralisation efforts in a conflict known as the Mad War
Mad War
(1485-1488), which resulted in a victory for the royal government. In a remarkable stroke of audacity, Charles married Anne of Brittany in 1491 after she had already been married by proxy to the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
Maximilian I in a ceremony of questionable validity
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