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Montacute Castle
Montacute
Montacute
Castle
Castle
was a castle built on a hill overlooking the village of Montacute, Somerset, England.


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Castle Neroche
Castle
Castle
Neroche is a Norman motte-and-bailey castle on the site of an earlier hill fort in the parish of Curland, near Staple Fitzpaine, Somerset, England. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.[1]Contents1 Location 2 History2.1 Iron Age 2.2 Norman castle3 Air disaster 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingLocation[edit]Map of the castle siteThe hill rises to 260 metres (850 ft) on the northern escarpment of the Blackdown Hills. The area is part of a 35 square miles (91 km2) site covered by a landscape partnership, known as the Neroche Scheme which is establishing trails and a public forest
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Castles In Great Britain And Ireland
Castles have played an important military, economic and social role in Great Britain and Ireland since their introduction following the Norman invasion of England
Norman invasion of England
in 1066. Although a small number of castles had been built in England in the 1050s, the Normans
Normans
began to build motte and bailey and ringworks castles in large numbers to control their newly occupied territories in England and the Welsh Marches. During the 12th century the Normans
Normans
began to build more castles in stone – with characteristic square keeps – that played both military and political roles. Royal castles were used to control key towns and the economically important forests, while baronial castles were used by the Norman lords to control their widespread estates
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English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
(officially the English Heritage
English Heritage
Trust) is a registered charity that manages the National Heritage Collection.[3] This comprises over 400 of England's historic buildings, monuments and sites spanning more than 5,000 years of history. Within its portfolio are Stonehenge, Dover Castle, Tintagel Castle
Tintagel Castle
and the best preserved parts of Hadrian's Wall
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Folly
In architecture, a folly is a building constructed primarily for decoration, but suggesting through its appearance some other purpose, or of such extravagant appearance that it transcends the range of garden ornaments usually associated with the class of buildings to which it belongs. Eighteenth-century English gardens
English gardens
and French landscape gardening often featured mock Roman temples, symbolising classical virtues. Other 18th-century garden follies represented Chinese temples, Egyptian pyramids, ruined abbeys, or Tatar tents, to represent different continents or historical eras
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Scheduled Monument
In the United Kingdom, a scheduled monument is a "nationally important" archaeological site or historic building, given protection against unauthorised change. The various pieces of legislation used for legally protecting heritage assets from damage and destruction are grouped under the term ‘designation’
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John Leland (antiquary)
Leland may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Other uses 4 See alsoPlaces[edit]NorwayLeland, NorwayUnited StatesLeland, Illinois Leland, Iowa Leland, Michigan Leland, Mississippi Leland, North Carolina Leland, Washington Leland, Wisconsin Leland Castle, a building in New Rochelle, New York Leland Grove, Illinois Leland Township, Michigan Leland High School (San Jose, California) Leland River, MichiganPeople[edit] Leland (composer) (born 1991), American singer, songwriter, record producer, and composerGiven nameYung L.A., birth name Leland Austin, rapper Leland Bardwell, author Leland Chapman, bounty hunter Leland D
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Antiquarian
An antiquarian or antiquary (from the Latin: antiquarius, meaning pertaining to ancient times) is an aficionado or student of antiquities or things of the past. More specifically, the term is used for those who study history with particular attention to ancient artifacts, archaeological and historic sites, or historic archives and manuscripts
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Saint Michael
Michael (Hebrew pronunciation: [mixaˈʔel]; Hebrew: מִיכָאֵל‎, translit. Mîkhā'ēl, lit. 'Who is like God?'; Greek: Μιχαήλ, translit. Mikhaḗl; Latin: Michahel;Coptic: ⲙⲓⲭⲁⲏⲗ, Arabic: ميخائيل‎, translit. Mīkhā'īl) is an archangel in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran traditions, he is called " Saint
Saint
Michael the Archangel" and "Saint Michael". In the Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
and Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
traditions, he is called " Taxiarch Archangel
Archangel
Michael" or simply " Archangel
Archangel
Michael". Michael is mentioned three times in the Book of Daniel
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Castle Chapel
Castle
Castle
chapels (German: Burgkapellen) in European architecture are chapels that were built within a castle. They fulfil the religious requirements of the castle lord and his retinue, sometimes also served as a burial site. Because the construction of such church edifices was expensive for the lord of the castle, separate chapels are not found at every seat of the nobility. Often, a secondary room furnished with an altar had to suffice. According to historian Sarah Speight, "The religious role of chapels was as normal, as routine, and arguably, as integral to castles as any concern for symbolism and/or military strength."[1] Castle
Castle
chapels were usually consecrated to saints; especially those associated with knighthood, such as Saint
Saint
George or Saint
Saint
Gereon
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Montacute Priory
Montacute
Montacute
Priory was a Cluniac priory of the Benedictine
Benedictine
order in Montacute, Somerset, England.Contents1 History 2 Remains 3 See also 4 References 5 External References 6 External linksHistory[edit] It was founded between 1078[1] and 1102[2] by William, Count of Mortain, in face of a threat that if he did not do so, the King would take the land from him.[3] It was the only Somerset
Somerset
dependency of Cluny Abbey
Cluny Abbey
until 1407, when it gained independence from France. It was dissolved in 1539,[1] though there was a short restoration under the Catholic Queen Mary.[4] At its height in 1262 there were 25 monks.[5] In 1539 there were a Prior and 16 monks. At the time of the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
in 1086 there were five manors in Mudford
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Cluny Abbey
Cluny
Cluny
Abbey (formerly also Cluni, or Clugny, French pronunciation: ​[klyni]) is a former Benedictine monastery in Cluny, Saône-et-Loire, France. It was dedicated to St Peter. The abbey was constructed in the Romanesque architectural style, with three churches built in succession from the 4th to the early 12th centuries. The earliest basilica was the world's largest church until the St. Peter's Basilica
Basilica
construction began in Rome.[1] Cluny
Cluny
was founded by William I, Duke of Aquitaine
William I, Duke of Aquitaine
in 910. He nominated Berno as the first Abbot
Abbot
of Cluny, subject only to Pope
Pope
Sergius III. The abbey was notable for its stricter adherence to the Rule of St. Benedict, whereby Cluny
Cluny
became acknowledged as the leader of western monasticism
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Bishop Of Coutances
The Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Diocese
Diocese
of Coutances
Coutances
(–Avranches) (Latin: Dioecesis Constantiensis (–Abrincensis); French: Diocèse de Coutances
Coutances
(–Avranches)) is a diocese of the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church in France. Its mother church is the Cathedral
Cathedral
of Coutance in the commune of Coutances
Coutances
in France. The diocese is suffragan of the Archbishop of Rouen
Rouen
and comprises the entire department of Manche
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Geoffrey De Montbray
Geoffrey de Montbray
Montbray
(Montbrai, Mowbray) (died 1093), bishop of Coutances (Latin: Constantiensis), also known as Geoffrey of Coutances, a Norman nobleman, trusted adviser of William the Conqueror and a great secular prelate, warrior and administrator.Contents1 Career 2 His character 3 Notes 4 References 5 Additional referencesCareer[edit] Geoffrey, from his name, was apparently from Montbrai, Manche, in the arrondissement of
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Somerset
Somerset
Somerset
(/ˈsʌmərsɛt/ ( listen)) (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England
England
which borders Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and Bristol
Bristol
to the north, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the east, Dorset
Dorset
to the south-east and Devon
Devon
to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
and the Bristol
Bristol
Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales
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