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Mongo Santamaria
Ramón "Mongo" Santamaría Rodríguez (April 7, 1917 – February 1, 2003) was a rumba quinto master and an Afro-Cuban
Afro-Cuban
Latin jazz percussionist. He is most famous for being the composer of the jazz standard "Afro Blue", recorded by John Coltrane
John Coltrane
among others. In 1950 he moved to New York City
New York City
where he played with Perez Prado, Tito Puente, Cal Tjader, Fania All Stars, etc. He was an integral figure in the fusion of Afro-Cuban
Afro-Cuban
rhythms with R&B and soul, paving the way for the boogaloo era of the late 1960s. His 1963 hit rendition of Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man" (recorded on December 17, 1962) was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998. Mongo Santamaría
Mongo Santamaría
was one of a handful of Cuban congueros ("conga players") who came to the United States in the 1940s and 1950s
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Havana
Havana
Havana
(/həˈvænə/; Spanish: La Habana, [la aˈβana] ( listen)) is the capital city, largest city, province, major port, and leading commercial center of Cuba.[3] The city has a population of 2.1 million inhabitants,[2][3] and it spans a total of 728.26 km2 (281.18 sq mi) – making it the largest city by area, the most populous city, and the fourth largest metropolitan area in the Caribbean
Caribbean
region.[2][4] The city extends mostly westward and southward from the bay, which is entered through a narrow inlet and which divides into three main harbors: Marimelena, Guanabacoa
Guanabacoa
and Atarés
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Merceditas Valdés
Mercedes Valdés Granit (September 24, 1922 – June 13, 1996), better known as Merceditas Valdés, was a Cuban singer who specialized in Afro-Cuban traditional music. Under the aegis of ethnomusicologists Fernando Ortiz and Obdulio Morales, Valdés helped popularize Afro-Cuban music throughout Latin America. In 1949, she became one of the first female Santería
Santería
singers to be recorded. Her debut album was released at the start of the 1960s, when the Cuban government nationalized over the record industry. She then went on hiatus before making a comeback in the 1980s with a series of albums entitled Aché, in collaboration with artists such as Frank Emilio Flynn and rumba ensemble Yoruba Andabo
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Grammy Hall Of Fame
The Grammy Hall of Fame is a hall of fame to honor musical recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance. Inductees are selected annually by a special member committee of eminent and knowledgeable professionals from all branches of the recording arts. It is compiled by The Recording Academy
The Recording Academy
in the United States, and was established in 1973. Recordings (singles and albums) in all genres are eligible for selection, and must be at least 25 years old to be considered
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Justo Betancourt
Justo Betancourt (born December 6, 1940) is a Cuban singer famous for his interpretation of Pa' bravo yo. He was born in Matanzas, but has lived a significant amount of time in Puerto Rico
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Chano Pozo
Luciano Pozo González, better known as Chano Pozo (January 7, 1915 in Havana
Havana
– December 3, 1948 in New York City) was a Cuban jazz percussionist, singer, dancer and composer. Despite only living to age 33, he played a major role in the founding of Latin jazz. He was also a key influence on trumpet legend Dizzy Gillespie, co-writing some of Gillespie's Latin-flavored compositions including "Manteca" and "Tin Tin Deo", and serving as the first Latin percussionist in Gillespie's band.Contents1 Early life1.1 Santería2 Carnival 3 Career in Cuba 4 New York 5 Death 6 Discography 7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Luciano "Chano" Pozo González was born in Havana
Havana
to Cecelio González and Carnación Pozo. Chano grew up with three sisters and a brother, as well as his older half brother, Félix Chappottín, who would later become one of the great Cuban soneros
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Miami
Miami
Miami
(/maɪˈæmi/; Spanish pronunciation: [miˈami]) is a major port city on the Atlantic coast of south Florida
Florida
in the southeastern United States. As the seat of Miami-Dade County, the municipality is the principal, central, and the most populous city of the Miami metropolitan area and part of the second-most populous metropolis in the southeastern United States.[8] According to the U.S
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Julito Collazo
Julio "Julito" Collazo (1925 – March 5, 2004) was a master percussionist. Collazo was born in Havana, Cuba. He began playing the ritual music of Santería
Santería
on the batá drums at the age of fifteen. He moved to United States in the fifties to join in a world tour with the Afroamerican dancer Katherine Dunham
Katherine Dunham
and her Dance Company. Julito Collazo is one of a handful of Cuban percussionists who came to the United States in the 1940s and 1950s. Other notable Cuban percussionists who came to the U.S. during that time include Luciano "Chano" Pozo, Mongo Santamaría, Armando Peraza, Francisco Aguabella, Carlos Vidal Bolado and Modesto Durán. In the United States Collazo rose to prominence recording and performing with Tito Puente, Mongo Santamaría, Silvestre Méndez, Dizzy Gillespie
Dizzy Gillespie
and Machito, among others
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Riverside Records
Riverside Records was an American jazz record company and label. Founded by Orrin Keepnews
Orrin Keepnews
and Bill Grauer under his firm Bill Grauer Productions in 1953, the label played an important role in the jazz record industry for a decade.[1] Riverside headquarters were located in New York City, at 553 West 51st Street.[2]Contents1 History 2 Living Legends 3 Riverside Wonderland 4 End 5 Discography 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Initially the company was dedicated to reissuing early jazz material licensed from the Chicago-based Paramount Records
Paramount Records
label and Gennett Records. Reissued artists included Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Ma Rainey, and James P. Johnson, but the label began issuing its own contemporary jazz recordings in April 1954, beginning with pianist Randy Weston
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Religion
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Boogaloo
Boogaloo or bugalú (also: shing-a-ling, Latin boogaloo, Latin R&B) is a genre of Latin music and dance which was popular in the United States
United States
in the 1960s. Boogaloo originated in New York City mainly among teenage Puerto Ricans. The style was a fusion of popular African American rhythm and blues (R&B) and soul music with mambo and son montuno, with songs in both English and Spanish
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Bongos
Bongos (Spanish: bongó) are an Afro-Cuban
Afro-Cuban
percussion instrument consisting of a pair of small open bottomed drums of different sizes. In Spanish the larger drum is called the hembra (female) and the smaller the macho (male). Together with the conga or tumbadora, and to a lesser extent the batá drum, bongos are the most widespread Cuban hand drums, being commonly played in genres such as son cubano, salsa and Afro-Cuban
Afro-Cuban
jazz.[1] A bongo drummer is known as a bongosero.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Evolution and popularization 1.3 In the United States2 Technique 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The origin of the bongo is largely unclear
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Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicis
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Caballero Rivero Woodlawn Park North Cemetery And Mausoleum
Caballero Rivero Woodlawn North Park Cemetery
Cemetery
and Mausoleum
Mausoleum
is one of the oldest cemeteries in Miami, Florida. Woodlawn Park Cemetery
Cemetery
– North was established in 1913 by three pioneers in Miami’s early history – Thomas O. Wilson, William N. Urmey and Clifton D. Benson. The Woodlawn group of cemeteries grew throughout the years, and funeral homes were added as well. They invested thousands of dollars importing rare tropical trees and shrubs, including the first schefflera (umbrella trees) and mahogany trees, to this country.Contents1 History 2 Notable burials 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Woodlawn Park in 1926 commissioned a noted mausoleum architect, McDonald Lovell, to design a mausoleum for the park
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Hemiola
In music, hemiola (also hemiolia) is the ratio 3:2. The equivalent Latin term is sesquialtera. In pitch, hemiola refers to the interval of a perfect fifth. In rhythm, hemiola refers to three beats of equal value in the time normally occupied by two beats.Contents1 Etymology 2 Pitch2.1 The perfect fifth 2.2 Other intervals3 Rhythm3.1 Vertical hemiola: sesquialtera 3.2 Sub-Saharan African music 3.3 In European music 3.4 Horizontal hemiola4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingEtymology[edit] The word hemiola comes from the Greek adjective ἡμιόλιος, hemiolios, meaning "containing one and a half," "half as much again," "in the ratio of one and a half to one (3:2), as in musical sounds."[1] The words "hemiola" and "sesquialtera" both signify the ratio 3:2, and in music were first used to describe relations of pitch. Dividing the string of a monochord in this ratio produces the interval of a perfect fifth
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Ostinato
In music, an ostinato [ostiˈnaːto] (derived from Italian: stubborn, compare English, from Latin: 'obstinate') is a motif or phrase that persistently repeats in the same musical voice, frequently at the same pitch. Well-known ostinato-based pieces include both classical compositions such as Ravel's Boléro
Boléro
and popular songs such as Donna Summer and Giorgio Moroder's "I Feel Love" (1977), Henry Mancini's theme from Peter Gunn (1959), and The Verve's "Bitter Sweet Symphony" (1997).[1][2] The repeating idea may be a rhythmic pattern, part of a tune, or a complete melody in itself.[3] Both ostinatos and ostinati are accepted English plural forms, the latter reflecting the word's Italian etymology
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