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Monasticism
Monasticism
Monasticism
(from Greek μοναχός, monachos, derived from μόνος, monos, "alone") or monkhood is a religious way of life in which one renounces worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work. Monastic life plays an important role in many Christian
Christian
churches, especially in the Catholic and Orthodox traditions. Similar forms of religious life also exist in other faiths, most notably in Buddhism, but also in Hinduism
Hinduism
and Jainism, although the expressions differ considerably.[1] By contrast, in other religions monasticism is criticized and not practiced, as in Islam
Islam
and Zoroastrianism, or plays a marginal role, as in Judaism. Women pursuing a monastic life are generally called nuns, while monastic men are called monks. Many monks and nuns live in monasteries to stay away from the secular world
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Rule Of St Benedict
The Rule of Saint Benedict
Rule of Saint Benedict
(Latin: Regula Benedicti) is a book of precepts written by Benedict of Nursia
Benedict of Nursia
(c. AD 480–550) for monks living communally under the authority of an abbot.An 8th-century copy of the Rule of Saint BenedictThe spirit of Saint Benedict's Rule is summed up in the motto of the Benedictine
Benedictine
Confederation: pax ("peace") and the traditional ora et labora ("pray and work"). Compared to other precepts, the Rule provides a moderate path between individual zeal and formulaic institutionalism; because of this middle ground it has been widely popular
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Taoist Philosophy
Taoist philosophy
Taoist philosophy
(Chinese: 道家; pinyin: dàojiā; lit. "school or family of the Tao") also known as Taology (Chinese: 道學; pinyin: dàoxué; lit. "learning of the Tao") refers to the various philosophical currents of Taoism, a tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao
Tao
(Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào; literally: "the Way", also romanized as Dao). The Tao
Tao
is a mysterious and deep principle that is the source, pattern and substance of the entire universe.[1][2] Throughout its history, Taoist philosophy
Taoist philosophy
has emphasized concepts like wu wei (effortless action), ziran ("naturalness"), ying and yang, Ch'i ("life energy"), Wu (non-being), and personal cultivation through meditation and other spiritual practices
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Tibet
Coordinates: 31°12′N 88°48′E / 31.2°N 88.8°E / 31.2; 88.8              "Greater Tibet" as claimed by Tibetan exile groups Tibetan autonomous areas, as designated by China  Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region, within ChinaChinese-controlled, claimed by India
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
(from Greek ορθοδοξία, orthodoxía – "right opinion")[1] is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.[2] In the Christian sense the term means "conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church."[3] The first seven Ecumenical Councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim of formalizing accepted doctrines. In some English speaking countries, Jews who adhere to all the traditions and commandments as legislated in the
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White Cloud Monastery
The White Cloud Temple or the Monastery of the White Clouds (simplified Chinese: 白云观; traditional Chinese: 白雲觀; pinyin: Bái Yún Gùan; literally: "White Cloud Compound") is a Daoist temple located in Beijing, China. It is one of "The Three Great Ancestral Courts" of the Quanzhen School of Daoism, and is titled "The First Temple under Heaven".Contents1 History 2 Layout2.1 Yuhuang Hall 2.2 Laolü Hall 2.3 Qiuzu Hall 2.4 Sanqing Hall3 Ordinations 4 Festivals 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesHistory[edit] The White Cloud Temple was first founded in the mid-8th century during the Tang dynasty, and was initially called Tianchang Abbey (天長觀; Abbey of Celestial Perpetuity). During this period, the abbey was state-sponsored and staffed by an elite clergy. From 1125 to 1215 when what is now Beijing was controlled by the Jin dynasty, the abbey served as the Daoist administrative headquarters and played an important role in state ceremonies
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World (theology)
The world is the planet Earth
Earth
and all life upon it, including human civilization.[1] In a philosophical context, the "world" is the whole of the physical Universe, or an ontological world (the "world" of an individual). In a theological context, the world is the material or the profane sphere, as opposed to the celestial, spiritual, transcendent or sacred. The "end of the world" refers to scenarios of the final end of human history, often in religious contexts. History of the world
History of the world
is commonly understood as spanning the major geopolitical developments of about five millennia, from the first civilizations to the present
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Daozang
Daozang (Chinese: 道藏; pinyin: Dàozàng; Wade-Giles: Tao
Tao
Tsang), meaning "Taoist Canon", consists of around 1,400 texts that were collected c. 400 (after the Dao De Jing
Dao De Jing
and Zhuang Zi which are the core Taoist texts). They were collected by Taoist monks of the period in an attempt to bring together all of the teachings of Taoism, including all the commentaries and expositions of the various masters from the original teachings found in the Tao
Tao
Te Ching and Zhuangzi. It was split into Three Grottoes, which mirrors the Buddhist Tripitaka (three baskets) division
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Monastic Cell
A cell is a small room used by a hermit, monk, anchorite or nun to live and as a devotional space. They are often part of larger communities such as Catholic
Catholic
and Orthodox monasteries and Buddhist vihara,[1] but may also form stand-alone structures in remote locations.Hermit's cell near Moville
Moville
high cross, Ireland.Contents1 Etymology 2 In Christianity 3 Buddhism 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit]Anchorite's cell in Skipton.The word cell comes from the Old French
Old French
celle meaning a monastic cell, itself from the Latin
Latin
meaning room,[2] store room or chamber.[3] In Christianity[edit] A cell in the Christian
Christian
context is a name for the living quarters of monastics, either male or female
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Ten Precepts (Buddhism)
The Five Precepts (Pali: pañcasīlāni; Sanskrit pañcaśīlāni[1]) constitute the basic code of ethics undertaken by upāsaka and upāsikā ("lay followers") of Buddhism. The precepts in all the traditions are essentially identical and are commitments to abstain from harming living beings, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying and intoxication. A precept is a general rule intended to regulate behaviour or thought. Undertaking the five precepts is part of both lay Buddhist initiation and regular lay Buddhist devotional practices. They are not formulated as imperatives, but as training rules that lay people undertake voluntarily to facilitate practice.[2] Additionally, in the Theravada schools of Buddhism, the bhikkhuni lineage died out, and women renunciates practicing Theravadin Buddhism have developed unofficial options for their own practice, dedicating their life to religion, vowing celibacy, living an ascetic life and holding eight or ten precepts
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Pāli
Pali
Pali
(Pāli) or Magadhan is a Prakrit
Prakrit
language native to the Indian subcontinent
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Mahaprajapati
Mahāprajāpatī Gotamī (Pali; Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Mahāprajāpatī Gautamī) was the step-mother and maternal aunt (mother's sister) of Buddha. In Buddhist tradition, she was the first woman to seek ordination for women, which she did from Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
directly, and she became the first bhikkhuni (Buddhist nun).[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Ordination of the first woman 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksBiography[edit] Tradition says Maya and Mahāpajāpatī Gotamī were Koliyan princess and sisters of Suppabuddha
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Parinibbana
In Buddhism, the term parinirvana (Sanskrit: parinirvāṇa; Pali: parinibbāna) is commonly used to refer to nirvana-after-death, which occurs upon the death of the body of someone who has attained nirvana during his or her lifetime
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