HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Monarchy Of The United Kingdom
The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies and its overseas territories. The current monarch and head of state, Queen Elizabeth II, ascended the throne on the death of her father, King George VI, on 6 February 1952. The monarch and his or her immediate family undertake various official, ceremonial, diplomatic and representational duties. As the monarchy is constitutional, the monarch is limited to non-partisan functions such as bestowing honours and appointing the Prime Minister. The monarch is commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces
[...More...]

"Monarchy Of The United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Executive (government)
The executive is the organ exercising authority in and holding responsibility for the governance of a state. The executive executes and enforces law. In political systems based on the principle of separation of powers, authority is distributed among several branches (executive, legislative, judicial) — an attempt to prevent the concentration of power in the hands of a small group of people. In such a system, the executive does not pass laws (the role of the legislature) or interpret them (the role of the judiciary). Instead, the executive enforces the law as written by the legislature and interpreted by the judiciary. The executive can be the source of certain types of law, such as a decree or executive order. Executive bureaucracies are commonly the source of regulations. In the Westminster political system, the principle of separation of powers is not as entrenched
[...More...]

"Executive (government)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

King-in-Council
The King-in-Council
King-in-Council
or Queen-in-Council, depending on the gender of the reigning monarch, is a constitutional term in a number of states. In a general sense, it would mean the monarch exercising executive authority, usually in the form of approving orders, in the presence of the country's executive council.Contents1 Norway 2 Sweden 3 The Commonwealth 4 See also4.1 Norway 4.2 Sweden 4.3 The Commonwealth5 FootnotesNorway[edit] Main article: Council of State (Norway) In Norway, the "King in Council" (Norwegian: Kongen i statsråd) refers to the meetings of the King and the Council of State (the Cabinet), where matters of importance and major decisions are made. The council meets at the Royal Palace and is normally held every Friday. It is chaired by the King or, if he is ill or abroad, the Crown Prince
[...More...]

"King-in-Council" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Norman Fowler, Baron Fowler
Peter Norman Fowler, Baron Fowler, PC (born 2 February 1938) is a British politician who was a member of Margaret Thatcher's ministry. He is currently the Lord Speaker, having assumed office at the beginning of September 2016. After serving as Shadow Minister of Transport, he was appointed Minister of Transport in 1979, being responsible for making seat belts compulsory. Later, as Secretary of State for Health
Secretary of State for Health
and Social Services, he drew public attention to the dangers of AIDS. He resigned from the cabinet as Employment Secretary, and was knighted in 1990. He was Chairman of the Conservative Party
Chairman of the Conservative Party
from 1992 to 1994, Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Transport and the Regions in 1997–98 and Shadow Home Secretary
Shadow Home Secretary
in 1998–99. In 2001, he was made a Conservative life peer
[...More...]

"Norman Fowler, Baron Fowler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Second May Ministry
The second May ministry was formed on 11 June 2017 after Elizabeth II invited Theresa May
Theresa May
to form a government following the June 2017 snap general election. The election resulted in a hung parliament with the Conservative Party losing its majority in the House of Commons
[...More...]

"Second May Ministry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Bercow
John Simon Bercow MP (/ˈbɜːrkoʊ/; born 19 January 1963) is a British politician who has been the Speaker of the House of Commons since June 2009. Prior to his election to Speaker, he was a member of the Conservative Party. A former hardline right-winger who changed his views after becoming an MP and at one time was rumoured to be likely to defect to the Labour Party, Bercow's election to the Speaker's chair depended heavily on the backing of other parties, and was deeply unpopular with many of his former colleagues.[2] He served as a councillor from 1986 to 1990 and unsuccessfully contested parliamentary seats in the 1987 and 1992 general elections. In the 1997 general election, Bercow was elected the MP for Buckingham and promoted to the shadow cabinet in 2001. He held posts in the shadow cabinets of Iain Duncan Smith
Iain Duncan Smith
and Michael Howard
[...More...]

"John Bercow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Succession To The British Throne
Succession to the British throne
Succession to the British throne
is determined by descent, gender (for people born before October 2011), legitimacy, and religion. Under common law, the Crown is inherited by a sovereign's children or by a childless sovereign's nearest collateral line. The Bill of Rights 1689 and the Act of Settlement 1701, restrict succession to the throne to the legitimate Protestant descendants of Sophia of Hanover
Sophia of Hanover
that are in "communion with the Church of England".[1] Spouses of Roman Catholics were disqualified from 1689 until the law was amended in 2015. Protestant descendants of those excluded for being Roman Catholics
Roman Catholics
are eligible.[2] Queen Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
is the sovereign, and her heir apparent is her eldest son, Charles, Prince of Wales. Next in line after him is Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, the Prince of Wales's elder son
[...More...]

"Succession To The British Throne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Crown
The Crown
The Crown
is the state in all its aspects within the jurisprudence of the Commonwealth realms and their sub-divisions (such as Crown dependencies, provinces, or states). The term is a metonym for both the state[1] and the reigning monarch.[2] A corporation sole, the Crown is the legal embodiment of executive, legislative, and judicial governance in the monarchy of each country. These monarchies are united by the personal union of their monarch, but they are independent states. The concept of the Crown developed first in England as a separation of the literal crown and property of the nation state from the person and personal property of the monarch. It spread through English and later British colonisation and is now rooted in the legal lexicon of the United Kingdom, its Crown dependencies, and the other 15 independent realms
[...More...]

"The Crown" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Non-departmental Public Body
In the United Kingdom, non-departmental public body (NDPB) is a classification applied by the Cabinet Office, Treasury, the Scottish Government and the Northern Ireland Executive
Northern Ireland Executive
to quangos (quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations)
[...More...]

"Non-departmental Public Body" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Erskine May
May
May
is the fifth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the third of seven months to have a length of 31 days. May
May
is a month of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and autumn in the Southern Hemisphere. Therefore, May
May
in the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
is the seasonal equivalent of November
November
in the Northern Hemisphere and vice versa
[...More...]

"Erskine May" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Legislature
A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation. Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators
[...More...]

"Legislature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jeremy Corbyn
Leader of the Labour Party Corbyn
Corbyn
leadership Corbynmania Constitutional Convention Bill Economic Advisory Committee Chakrabarti Inquiry Traingate Leadership challenge, 2016 ConferenceExiting the European Union European Union
European Union
beliefs EU referendum Labour In for Britain Invocation of Article 50 Aftermath of Brexit Brexit
Brexit
negotiationsElections2016 UK local elections 2016 London
London
Assembly election 2016 Police and Crime Commissioner elections 2017 UK local elections 2017 UK general electionCultural depictionsCorbyn: The Strange Rebirth of Radical Politics Comrade Corbyn: A Very Unlikely Coup Jeremy Corbyn: Accidental HeroPersonal life Honours and awardsv t eJeremy Bernard Corbyn
Corbyn
(/ˈkɔːrbɪn/; born 26 May 1949)[3] is a British politician serving as Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition since 2015
[...More...]

"Jeremy Corbyn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Statutory Instrument (UK)
Instrument may refer to:Contents1 Science and technology 2 Music 3 Other uses 4 See alsoScience and technology[edit]Flight instruments, the devices used to measure the speed, altitude, and pertinent flight angles of various kinds of aircraft Laboratory equipment, the measuring tools used in a scientific laboratory, often electronic in nature Mathematical instrument, devices used in geometric construction or measurements in astronomy, surveying and navigation Measuring instrument, a device used to measure or compare physical properties Medical instrument, a device used to diagnose or treat diseases Optical instrument, relies on the properties of light Quantum instrument, a mathematical object in quantum theory combining the concepts of measurement and quantum operation Scientific instrument, a device used to collect scienti
[...More...]

"Statutory Instrument (UK)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

56th Parliament Of The United Kingdom
In modern politics and history, a parliament is a legislative, elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate, making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. The term is similar to the idea of a senate, synod or congress, and is commonly used in countries that are current or former monarchies, a form of government with a monarch as the head. Some contexts restrict the use of the word parliament to parliamentary systems, although it is also used to describe the legislature in some presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g
[...More...]

"56th Parliament Of The United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hereditary
Heredity
Heredity
is the passing on of traits from parents to their offspring, either through asexual reproduction or sexual reproduction, the offspring cells or organisms acquire the genetic information of their parents. Through heredity, variations between individuals can accumulate and cause species to evolve by natural selection. The study of heredity in biology is genetics.Contents1 Overview 2 Relation to theory of evolution 3 History3.1 Gregor Mendel: father of genetics 3.2 Modern development of genetics and heredity 3.3 Common genetic disorders4 Types4.1 Dominant and recessive alleles5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Heredity
Heredity
of phenotypic traits: Father
Father
and son with prominent ears and crowns. DNA
DNA
structure
[...More...]

"Hereditary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

List Of British Royal Residences
This is a list of residences occupied by the British royal family, noting the seasons of the year they are traditionally occupied. Members of the royal family inhabit their range of residences across the United Kingdom. Some are royal palaces, owned by the Crown and held in trust by the monarch; others are privately owned. Balmoral Castle and Sandringham House
Sandringham House
have been inherited as private property for several generations. Other royal palaces are no longer residences (e.g., the Palace of Westminster, the Palace of Whitehall). Some remain in irregular use for royal occasions (such as Hillsborough Castle). The royal palaces enjoy certain legal privileges: for example, there is an exemption from levying duty on alcoholic beverages sold in the bars at the Palace of Westminster
Palace of Westminster
and there are exemptions from health and safety legislation
[...More...]

"List Of British Royal Residences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.