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Mitla
Mitla
Mitla
is the second most important archeological site in the state of Oaxaca
Oaxaca
in Mexico, and the most important of the Zapotec culture.[1][citation needed] The site is located 44 km from the city of Oaxaca.[2] in the upper end of the Tlacolula Valley, one of the three that form the Central Valleys Region of the state.[3] The archeological site is within the modern municipality of San Pablo Villa de Mitla.[4] While Monte Albán
Monte Albán
was most important as the political center, Mitla
Mitla
was the main religious center.[3] The name Mitla
Mitla
is derived from the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
name Mictlán, which was the place of the dead or underworld
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Common Bean
Phaseolus
Phaseolus
vulgaris, also known as the common bean[2] and green bean, among other names,[n 1] is a herbaceous annual plant grown worldwide for its edible dry seeds or unripe fruit (both commonly called beans). The main categories of common beans, on the basis of use, are dry beans (seeds harvested at complete maturity), snap beans (tender pods with reduced fibre harvested before the seed development phase) and shell beans (seeds harvested at physiological maturity). Its leaf is also occasionally used as a vegetable and the straw as fodder. Its botanical classification, along with other Phaseolus
Phaseolus
species, is as a member of the legume family Fabaceae, most of whose members acquire the nitrogen they require through an association with rhizobia, a species of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The common bean is a highly variable species that has a long history of cultivation
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Porfirio Díaz
José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz
Porfirio Díaz
Mori (Spanish pronunciation: [porˈfiɾjo ði.as]; 15 September 1830 – 2 July 1915) was a Mexican general and politician who served seven terms as President of Mexico, a total of three and a half decades, from 1876 to 1880 and from 1884 to 1911. A veteran of the War of the Reform (1858–60) and the French intervention in Mexico
Mexico
(1862–67), Díaz rose to the rank of General, leading republican troops against the French-imposed rule of Emperor Maximilian. Seizing power in a coup in 1876, Díaz and his allies, a group of technocrats known as "Científicos",[1] ruled Mexico
Mexico
for the next thirty-five years, a period known as the Porfiriato. Díaz has always been a controversial figure in Mexican history; while the Porfirian regime brought stability after decades of conflict, it grew unpopular due to civil repression and political stagnation
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Alfonso Caso
Alfonso Caso y Andrade (February 1, 1896 in Mexico
Mexico
City – November 30, 1970 in Mexico
Mexico
City) was an archaeologist who made important contributions to pre-Columbian studies in his native Mexico. Caso believed that the systematic study of ancient Mexican civilizations was an important way to understand Mexican cultural roots.[citation needed] His notable discoveries include the excavations at Monte Albán, in particular "Tomb Seven", in which several gold pieces and offerings were found (now shown in the Regional Museum of Oaxaca). He also discovered many sites in the Mixteca (a region in the state of Oaxaca), such as Yucuita, Yucuñudahui and Monte Negro
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Celebration Of Mexican Political Anniversaries In 2010
An anniversary is the date on which an event took place or an institution was founded in a previous year, and may also refer to the commemoration or celebration of that event. For example, the first event is the initial occurrence or, if planned, the inaugural of the event. One year later would be the first anniversary of that event. The word was first used for Catholic feasts to commemorate saints. Most countries celebrate national anniversaries, typically called national days. These could be the date of independence of the nation or the adoption of a new constitution or form of government
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INAH
Isoniazid, also known as isonicotinylhydrazide (INH), is an antibiotic used for the treatment of tuberculosis.[1] For active tuberculosis it is often used together with rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and either streptomycin or ethambutol.[2] For latent tuberculosis it is often used by itself.[1] It may also be used for atypical types of mycobacteria, such as M. avium, M. kansasii, and M
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Chili Pepper
The chili pepper (also chile pepper, chilli pepper, or simply chilli[1]) from Nahuatl
Nahuatl
chīlli Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈt͡ʃiːli] ( listen)) is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[2] They are widely used in many cuisines to add spiciness to dishes
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Squash (plant)
Cucurbita
Cucurbita
( Latin
Latin
for gourd)[3][4] is a genus of herbaceous vines in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, also known as cucurbits, native to the Andes
Andes
and Mesoamerica. Five species are grown worldwide for their edible fruit, variously known as squash, pumpkin, or gourd depending on species, variety, and local parlance,[a] and for their seeds. Other kinds of gourd, also called bottle-gourds, are native to Africa and belong to the genus Lagenaria, which is in the same family and subfamily as Cucurbita
Cucurbita
but in a different tribe
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Maize
Maize
Maize
(/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico[1][2] about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup
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Frieze
In architecture the frieze /friːz/ is the wide central section part of an entablature and may be plain in the Ionic or Doric order, or decorated with bas-reliefs. Even when neither columns nor pilasters are expressed, on an astylar wall it lies upon the architrave ('main beam') and is capped by the moldings of the cornice. A frieze can be found on many Greek and Roman buildings, the Parthenon Frieze
Parthenon Frieze
being the most famous, and perhaps the most elaborate. This style is typical for the Persians. In interiors, the frieze of a room is the section of wall above the picture rail and under the crown moldings or cornice. By extension, a frieze is a long stretch of painted, sculpted or even calligraphic decoration in such a position, normally above eye-level. Frieze decorations may depict scenes in a sequence of discrete panels
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Fretwork
Fretwork
Fretwork
is an interlaced decorative design that is either carved in low relief on a solid background, or cut out with a fretsaw, coping saw, jigsaw or scroll saw. Most fretwork patterns are geometric in design. The materials most commonly used are wood and metal.[1] Fretwork
Fretwork
is used to adorn furniture and musical instruments. The term is also used for tracery on glazed windows and doors. Fretwork
Fretwork
is also used to adorn/decorate architecture, where specific elements of decor are named according to their use such as eave bracket, gable fretwork or baluster fretwork, which may be of metal, especially cast iron or aluminum. Fretwork
Fretwork
patterns originally were ornamental designs used to decorate objects with a grid or a lattice. Designs have developed from the rectangular wave Greek fret to intricate intertwined patterns
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Syncretism
Syncretism
Syncretism
(/ˈsɪŋkrətɪzəm/) is the combining of different beliefs, while blending practices of various schools of thought. Syncretism
Syncretism
involves the merging or assimilation of several originally discrete traditions, especially in the theology and mythology of religion, thus asserting an underlying unity and allowing for an inclusive approach to other faiths
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Spanish People
Spain
Spain
Nationals 41,539,400[1] (for a total population of 47,059,533) Hundreds of millions with Spanish ancestors in the Americas especially in the Hispanic
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Hispanicization
Hispanicisation or hispanisation, also known as castilianization or castilianisation (Spanish: castellanización)[1] refers to the process by which a place or person becomes influenced by Hispanic
Hispanic
culture or a process of cultural and/or linguistic change in which something non- Hispanic
Hispanic
becomes Hispanic
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Trachyte
Trachyte
Trachyte
is an igneous volcanic rock with an aphanitic to porphyritic texture. It is the volcanic equivalent of syenite. The mineral assemblage consists of essential alkali feldspar; relatively minor plagioclase and quartz or a feldspathoid such as nepheline may also be present. (See the QAPF diagram). Biotite, clinopyroxene and olivine are common accessory minerals.Contents1 Chemical composition 2 Mineralogy 3 Geographic distribution 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksChemical composition[edit] Chemically, trachyte contains 60 to 65% silica content; less SiO2 than rhyolite and more (Na2O plus K2O) than dacite. These chemical differences are consistent with the position of trachyte in the TAS classification, and they account for the feldspar-rich mineralogy of the rock type. Mineralogy[edit]A polished opal on trachyteTrachytes usually consist mainly of sanidine feldspar
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Atrium (architecture)
In architecture, an atrium (plural: atria or atriums)[1] is a large open air or skylight covered space surrounded by a building.[2] Atria were a common feature in Ancient Roman dwellings, providing light and ventilation to the interior. Modern atria, as developed in the late 19th and 20th centuries, are often several stories high and having a glazed roof or large windows, and often located immediately beyond the main entrance doors (in the lobby). Atria are a popular design feature because they give their buildings a "feeling of space and light."[3] The atrium has become a key feature of many buildings in recent years.[4] Atria are popular with building users, building designers and building developers. Users like atria because they create a dynamic and stimulating interior that provides shelter from the external environment while maintaining a visual link with that environment
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