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Missouri Centennial Half Dollar
The Missouri
Missouri
Centennial half dollar is a commemorative fifty-cent piece struck by the United States Bureau of the Mint in 1921. It was designed by Robert Ingersoll Aitken. The U.S. state
U.S. state
of Missouri
Missouri
wanted a commemorative coin to sell at the centennial celebration, to be held in 1921. Legislation for such a coin passed through Congress without opposition, and was signed on March 4, 1921 by President Warren G. Harding
Warren G. Harding
on his inauguration day. Aitken was hired by the federal Commission of Fine Arts
Commission of Fine Arts
to design the coin. The design that was ultimately adopted depicted Daniel Boone
Daniel Boone
on both sides
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Assay Commission
The United States Assay Commission
United States Assay Commission
was an agency of the United States government from 1792 to 1980. Its function was to supervise the annual testing of the gold, silver, and (in its final years) base metal coins produced by the United States Mint
United States Mint
to ensure that they met specifications. Although some members were designated by statute, for the most part the commission, which was freshly appointed each year, consisted of prominent Americans, including numismatists. Appointment to the Assay Commission was eagerly sought after, in part because commissioners received a commemorative medal. These medals, different each year, are extremely rare, with the exception of the 1977 issue, which was sold to the general public. The Mint Act of 1792
Mint Act of 1792
authorized the Assay Commission. Beginning in 1797, it met in most years at the Philadelphia Mint
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Obverse And Reverse
Obverse and its opposite, reverse, refer to the two flat faces of coins and some other two-sided objects, including paper money, flags, seals, medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art, and printed fabrics. In this usage, obverse means the front face of the object and reverse means the back face. The obverse of a coin is commonly called heads, because it often depicts the head of a prominent person, and the reverse tails. In fields of scholarship outside numismatics, the term front is more commonly used than obverse, while usage of reverse is widespread. The equivalent terms used in codicology, manuscript studies, print studies and publishing are "recto" and "verso".Contents1 Identification 2 Modern coins 3 Specific currencies3.1 Coins of the European Union 3.2 Coins of Japan 3.3 Coins of the United Kingdom 3.4 Coins of the United States4 See also 5 ReferencesIdentification[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Covered Wagon
The covered wagon was long the dominant form of transport in pre-industrial America. With roots in the heavy Conestoga wagon developed for the rough, undeveloped roads and paths of the colonial East, the covered wagon spread west with American migration. Heavily relied upon along such travel routes as the Great Wagon Road
Great Wagon Road
and the Santa Fe and Oregon Trails, it carried settlers seeking land, gold, and new futures ever further west. With its ubiquitous exposure in 20th century media, the covered wagon grew to become an icon of the American West. The fanciful nickname Prairie Schooner
Prairie Schooner
and romantic depiction in wagon trains only served to embellish the legend.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]A Prairie Schooner
Prairie Schooner
on the Cariboo Road or in the vicinity of Rogers Pass, Selkirk Mountains, c
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Thomas Hart Benton (politician)
Thomas Hart Benton (March 14, 1782 – April 10, 1858), nicknamed "Old Bullion", was a United States
United States
Senator from Missouri. A member of the Democratic Party, he was an architect and champion of westward expansion by the United States, a cause that became known as Manifest Destiny. Benton served in the Senate from 1821 to 1851, becoming the first member of that body to serve five terms. Benton was born in Harts Mill, North Carolina. After graduating from the University of North Carolina, he established a law practice and plantation near Nashville, Tennessee. He served as an aide to General Andrew Jackson during the War of 1812
War of 1812
and settled in St. Louis, Missouri, after the war. Missouri
Missouri
became a state in 1821 and Benton won election as one of its inaugural pair of United States
United States
Senators
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James Earle Fraser (sculptor)
James Earle Fraser (November 4, 1876 – October 11, 1953) was an American sculptor during the first half of the 20th century. His work is integral to many of Washington, D.C.'s most iconic structures.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Images 3 Works3.1 Public monuments 3.2 Selected architectural sculpture 3.3 Other works4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksLife and career[edit] Fraser was born in Winona, Minnesota. His father, Thomas Fraser, was an engineer who worked for railroad companies as they expanded across the American West
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Medallic Art Company
Medallic Art Company, Ltd. based in Dayton, Nevada
Dayton, Nevada
is "America’s oldest and largest private mint" and specializes in making academic awards, maces, medallions, along with chains of office and universities medals for schools.[1][2] The Medallic Art Company
Medallic Art Company
makes custom 2D and 3D medals[3] and "has produced some of the world’s most distinguished awards such as the Pulitzer Prize, the Peabody Award, the Newbery and Caldecott medals, and the Inaugural medals for eleven U.S. Presidents."[4] The Medallic Art Company also struck medals for two important medallic art series in the United States: the Circle of Friends of the Medallion[5] and The Society of Medalists.[6] In August 1971, Joseph B. Hartzog, Jr., director of the National Park Service, awarded a contract to the Kalispell, Montana, firm of Roche Jaune Inc
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The Numismatist
The Numismatist
The Numismatist
(formerly Numismatist) is a monthly publication by the American Numismatic Association. Its current editor is Barbara Gregory. The Numismatist
The Numismatist
contains articles written on such topics as coins, tokens, medals, paper money, and stock certificates. All members of the American Numismatic Association
American Numismatic Association
receive the publication as part of their membership benefits. History[edit] The Numismatist
The Numismatist
was originally published as a four-page leaflet in 1888 by George F. Heath in Chicago. The name was purchased by the American Numismatic Association
American Numismatic Association
many years later when the organization began to print a monthly publication for the benefit of its members.[1] References[edit]^ Klinger, David (January 9, 2011). "The American Numismatist". E-Sylum
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American Numismatic Association
The American Numismatic Association
American Numismatic Association
(ANA) is a Colorado
Colorado
Springs, Colorado
Colorado
organization founded in 1891 by Dr. George F. Heath. It was formed to advance the knowledge of numismatics (the study of money) along educational, historical, and scientific lines, as well as enhance interest in the hobby.[1][2][3][4] The ANA has about 24,000 members who receive many benefits, such as discounts, access to website features, and the monthly journal The Numismatist. The ANA's Colorado
Colorado
Springs headquarters houses its administrative offices, library, and money museum. The ANA received a Federal Charter from the United States Congress
United States Congress
in 1912.[1][2][3][4] A Board of Governors are in charge of the ANA. Numerous advisory committees help to operate it properly
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Director Of The United States Mint
The Director of the United States Mint
United States Mint
is the head of the United States Mint. The position is currently vacant. Since January 20, 2017, the senior career official at the Mint has been Acting Principal Deputy Director David Motl.[1] The office of Director has existed since the creation of the Mint by the Coinage Act of 1792. Initially appointed serving at the pleasure of the President of the United States, the Coinage Act of 1873 specified a five-year term for Directors. The Director operates with general directions provided by the United States Secretary of the Treasury. Since the resignation of Edmund C. Moy in 2011 the mint has been without an official director
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Raymond T. Baker
Raymond Thomas Baker (1877–1935) was a rich United States businessman who was Director of the United States
United States
Mint from 1917 to 1922. Biography[edit] Raymond T. Baker
Raymond T. Baker
was born in Eureka, Nevada
Eureka, Nevada
in 1877, the son of George Washington Baker, the lead counsel of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and Mary Agnes (Hall) Baker.[1] He was educated at the University of Nevada, Reno, then at Stanford University.[2] After college, Baker became involved in gold mining, being one of the first investors active in Rawhide, Nevada.[2] He became a rich man when he sold his claims.[2] He then moved east and had a brief romantic relationship with Elinor Glyn.[2] Baker had a longtime interest in prison reform and in 1911, with his brother, Cleve Baker, serving as Nevada Attorney General, Raymond T. Baker
Raymond T

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Walter Breen
Walter H. Breen Jr. (September 5, 1928 – April 27, 1993) was an American numismatist, writer and convicted child sex offender, and the husband of author Marion Zimmer Bradley. He is known among coin collectors for writing Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins. "Breen numbers", from his encyclopedia, are widely used to attribute varieties of coins. He is also known for activity in the science fiction fan community and for his writings in defense of pederasty.Contents1 Early life 2 Writings 3 Arrests and convictions 4 Personal life 5 Selected publications 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Breen was born in San Antonio, Texas, the son of Walter Henry Breen Sr. and Mary Helena (Nellie) Brown Mehl.[1] He spent the first several years of his life in Texas with his parents.[2] At the time they met, both of Walter's parents were married to other people and living next door to each other in Parkersburg, WV
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Albert Vestal
Albert Henry Vestal (January 18, 1875 – April 1, 1932) was a Republican United States Representative from Indiana from 1917 to 1932. Biography[edit] Born on a farm near Frankton, in Madison County, Indiana, on January 18, 1875, he attended common schools, worked in steel mills and factories and attended the Indiana State Normal School, now Indiana State University, at Terre Haute. He taught school for several years and then graduated from the law department of the Valparaiso University in 1896. Admitted to the bar in 1896, Vestal commenced practicing law in Anderson, Indiana. He was elected prosecuting attorney of the fiftieth judicial circuit and served from 1900 to 1906. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican nomination for Congress in 1908 and an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1914 to the Sixty-fourth Congress. However, he was elected as a Republican to the Sixty-fifth Congress and to seven succeeding Congresses, serving from March 4, 1917, until his death
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Albin Polasek
Albin Polasek
Albin Polasek
(February 14, 1879 – May 19, 1965) was a Czech-American sculptor and educator. He created more than four hundred works during his career, two hundred of which are now displayed in the Albin Polasek
Albin Polasek
Museum & Sculpture Gardens in Winter Park, Florida.Contents1 Career 2 Selected works 3 Cemetery monuments 4 Images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCareer[edit] Born as Albín Polášek in Frenštát, Moravia, part of the Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
(now in the Czech Republic), Polasek apprenticed as a wood carver in Vienna. At the age of 22 he emigrated to the United States and began formal art training at age 25 under Charles Grafly
Charles Grafly
at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
in Philadelphia
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Hall Of Fame For Great Americans
79001567 [1]Significant datesAdded to NRHP September 7, 1979Designated NYCL February 15, 1966The Hall of Fame for Great Americans
Hall of Fame for Great Americans
is an outdoor sculpture gallery, located on the grounds of Bronx Community College
Bronx Community College
in the Bronx, New York City
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Coonskin Cap
A coonskin cap is a hat fashioned from the skin and fur of a raccoon. The original coonskin cap consisted of the entire skin of the raccoon including its head and tail
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